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SPONSOR 



HE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/ RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




SPECIAL REPOiF 

ON 

VIDEOTAPE 

By \earV end 250 
videotape recorders 
will ]»e in use. Here 
i^ a special SPONSOR re- 
port o!i how videotape 
work>. what it costs, 
what it can do for the 
ad\erti?.ei. the agency 
and the hi oadcaster 

Page 29 

What a timeiMiyer 
can do to get 
ahead 

Page 34 

How to get extra 
mileage from your 
syndicated flhn 

Page 36 



A new idea for 
streamlining 
rate cards 

Page 40 



DIGEST ON iPAG€ 




THIS 
IS 
AMERICA'S 



41ST 



RADIO MARKET 



Big Aggie, queen of WNAX-570's coverage area — rules over the 
two cities leading the nation in per capita sales 

Sioux City, Iowa, and Sioux Falls, South forming country. There are 2,217,600 people in 

Dakota, were recently listed by Soles Manage- Big Aggie Land and they hove over $3 billion 

ment as the :^ 1 and ;3r2 bright spots in the no- dollars in spendable income. It's o rich market — 

tion's economy. Retail soles in both cities are well a buying market — a market where WNAX-570 

above the notional overoge. delivers 66.4°o shore of audience. 



This is just port of Big Aggie Lond. WNAX- 
570 takes your product story to 5 states — 175 
counties locoted in some of the nation's richest 



To sell your product in Big Aggie Lond — sell 
on the station that most people listen to — 
WNAX-570. Your Kotz man has oil the details. 



f 



YANKTON, SOUTH DAKOTA 



WNAX-570 CBS RADIO ««« 



PEOPLES BROADCASTING CORP. 



To sell Indiana, 
you need both 
the 2nd and 3rd 
ranking markets. 

NOW 
ONE BUY 

delivers both — 



YOU NEED TWO LURES 
in Indiana! 




In this area of many lakes, plus countless "oF fishing 
holes," alert advertisers cover two major markets — 
South Bend -Elkhart and Fort Wayne— with one com- 
bination buy which saves 10% ! The coverage they get 
is from within— strong in its local loyalties— no longer 
influenced by that early-day "snow" from cities so far 
away. Take a close look at this rich interurbia: Over 
1.6 million population — $2.8 billion Effective Buying 
Income. Yours, with just one buy ! 

u ■» - o^^ 

call your MI™tT man nowl 




FORT WAYNE L) '^=^ ^^^ ^^J'n 



6 September 1958 • Vol. 12, Ao. 36 



^ SR0N30R 

^^^ THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/rAOIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



SPECIAL REPORT ON VIDEOTAPE 

29 BY YEAR'S END ABOUT 250 TAPE RECORDERS WILL BE 
IN USE AND TV WILL BE WELL INTO A REVOLUTION 



What a timebuyer can do to get ahead 

34 l^op pxeciitives who started out as timebuyers give tips, hints, ^ 
tical DO's and DOXTs to today's young men following in t 



Why merchandise a syndicated show? 



36 M<» 



ers find that well-planned i 
the success or failure of 



How radio sells a quality image for sterling silver 

37 When sl.-rling silver manufacturers wanted to change tile ■•image" of 
tiicir war<-s, they employed a new and effective strategy for radio 

The last of the whitecoats 

38 What will happen after New Year's when NAB cracks down on medic 
dreTmatizations in commercials? Here's the dope on doctor's dilemma 

O'Connell's streamlined rate card 

40 V^''"i> iim<'l)uyers applaud representative's plan to cut down on the 
of the frequency discount 



=rs applaud representative 
some favor the retentio 



Dixie Cup hard sells with net saturation 

42 'his company used a new twist to get the most inii)act jxr ad dollar — 
they condensed a year-long net tv campaign into one-month saturation 

An early look at fall tv 

43 Network tv's lineup is beginning to take shape, with 32 of the summer 
shows being replaced during the period 30 August through 26 September 

SPONSOR ASKS: How will independents program 
against network competition? 

54 Four major independent slalion- reveal their slral(f;\ for programing 
in the fall l.alllc against llie highly competitive network lineup 



FEATURES 

€5 FilM..^.„,„- 

24 19lh and Madison 

«« Marketing Vi eek 

T2 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

4 Newsmaker of the ^fil 
72 Picture Wrap-lp 
12 Sponsor Backstage 
■•S Sponsor Hears 



17 Sponsor-Scope 




84. Sponsor Speaks 




61 Spot Buy. 




84 Ten Second Spot. 




8 Timebuyers at W, 


ik 


82 Tv and Radio Nc 


^smakers 


70 Tv Results 




67 Washington \^e,k 





Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 



EDITORIAI. OEPARTIVIENr 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMiJIin 
Managing Editor 
Alvin W. Outcalt 
News Editor 
Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 
Alfied J. Jaffe 
Senior Editor 
W. F. Mlksch 
Associate Editor 
Russ Carpenter 
Midwest Editor (Chicago) 



Film Editor 

Beth Drexler Brod 
Assistant Editors 



Advertising Promotion Manager 

Jane Pinkerton 
VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 
Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 
Sandra Lee Oncay. Assi 
Administrative Staff 
Dorris Bowers 
George Becke. 
Jessie Ritter 

Circulation Department 
Seymour Weber 
Emily Cutlllo 
Harry B. Fleischman 
Accounting Department 
Laura Oken 



Readers' Service 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial Circu- 
[^Ad^cftising Offices: 40 E. 49fh St. 



49th & Madison) New York 1 

Murray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Offici 
superior 7-9863. 






House, Birr 



612 N. Michigan ; 
Birmingham Office 

Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los AngeVes OfficeTeOST 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089 
Pr.ntmg Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Balti^iore |1 
Md^ Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U S A 
Address all correspondence to 40 E 49th St 
N. Y 17. N. Y. Murray Hill 8-2772.' Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc Entered as 
i?^j'"\'"f/^" °"." January 1948 at the Balti- 
more postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

©1958 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



AnneiiiiGeiiieii^ 



WMBR-TV, Channel 4, 

Jacksonville, Florida, 
virill change its 
call letters to 



WJXT 



Channel 4, 
effective 
Sept. 14, 1958 



An Affiliate of the CBS Television Network Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 

Operated by The Washington Post Broadcast Division 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Half-hour or hour format, first or 
umpteenth time around, Hopalong 
Cassidy js unstoppable, no matter 
how you figure it! 

RATING (ARB'58, 1st half-year) : 
Fresno- 19.4. < 
Huntington -24.0. [ All sixth run! 
Jotinstown-31.9. ' 

SHARE (ARB '58, 1st half-year): 
First run in Knoxville-79%. 
Sixtti run in Minneapolis-St. Paul-82%. 
Nineteenth run in New York-32%. 

AUDIENCE GAINS (ARB 58 over 
comparable '57) : 
Indianapolis- up 90%! 
Baltimore-up 113%! 
Spokane-up 114%! 

CPM VIEWERS ('58 ARB, SRDS 

rate.'^. TV Magazine set count) : 

Half-hour: Baltimore $.48; 

Johnstown $.22; Detroit $.48! 

Full hour: Boston $.62; 

MinneapolisSt. Paul $.58; St. Louis $.34! 

If you have any questions, shoot! 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Last week, a distinguished SPO!SSOR alumnus was named 
to one of the biggest jobs in the ad agency business. Former 
SPOI\SOR tv columnist Robert L. Foreman was appointed 
head of all BBDO creative services, with responsibility for 
copy, art. radio, television and public relations. 

The newsmaker: In His Handsome 10th floor office at 
383 Madison Avenue last week, Bob Foreman's telephone was un- 
usually busy. First, there were endless callers congratulating the 
BBDO executive vice president (and plans board head I on his first 
novel. '"The Hot Half Hour," on sale this month. And second, there 
were even more callers congratulating Foreman on his appointment 
as head of all BBDO creative services, involving supervision of 
approximately 500 people. 

To young (42), articulate Bob Foreman, congratulations have 
come early and frequently. At 32, 
he was a v.p. of BBDO and head 
of the radio writing department. 
Later he moved up to become head 
of the whole radio/tv department. 
Only three years ago, at 39, he 
was elected to BBDO's board of 
directors, and only last year was 
made executive v.p. in charge of 
the agency's plans board. 

In his new role (v.p.'s of six 
major departments report directly 
to him). Foreman anticipates two 
major challenges. The first is the 
"integration" of print and tv copy, to see that creative effort is chan- 
neled most effectively and efficiently. The second is to see that his 
creative people take the greatest advantage of BBDO's marketing 
and research operations. "There is a greater need for creativity to- 
day than ever before," he says, "but it must be channeled, with 
direction, to be a real asset." 

Foreman has worked closely with BBDO president Charles Brower 
for almost all of the 19 years Foreman has been with BBDO, now 
succeeds Brower as creative head. Foreman will probably remain 
as plans board head, mainly, he says, "because they don't want to 
move that big conference table out of my office." 

A tv columnist for SPONSOR for many years, and author of "An 
Ad Man Ad-Libs on TV," Foreman wrote his about-to-be-published 
novel in longhand on Connecticut commuting trains and while 
lying in bed. He started the book last December and finished it in 
April, eight months ahead of schedule. Two motion picture com- 
panies are interested in the book which concerns a half-hour tv quiz 
show and the people whose lives are influenced by it. 

Foreman, his wife and three children live in Weston, Conn. An 
a\ id fly fisherman, hunter, theater-goer (and "angel"), he also col- 
lects articles of earlv Americana and rebuilds antique furniture. ^ 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Rober 



Omaha's Largest and Finest Film Collection... 




When you want to reach every member of the family in the prosperous 
Omaha market, use KETV's leading feature films. Latest 1958 ARB ranks 
them Number One in Omaha giving sponsors a 17.2 average rating for the 
9:35 early evening Movie Masterpiece alone! 

KETV owns more than 1,700 feature films from Hollywood's major 
studios. This gives KSTV the leading film collection in Omaha and one of 
the foremost in the entire nation. 

In Omaha, everyone knows that KE3TV is 

The Station that plans for movie fans ! 

See your 1 1 1 |T man for availabilities, including full minutes. 

O ^^ 

basic t*^*^ 
Ben H. Cowdery, President H^ ■§■ //|||||| WJ/// ^^* Eugene S. Thomas, V.P. & Gen. Mgr. 

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD STATION OMAHA, NEBRASKA 




SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 






' "- "^'^-*^"""^ 



M^' 
^!^%^' 



Season ticket on the bench 

They say Chic Hurley started it. From the day Ohio 
State's first All-Amcrican shattered the Michigan jinx, 
Central Ohioans have shared an insatiable, almost 
ferocious, sports appetite. It isn't really true that our 
natives request burial out near Ohio Stadium, but 
nowhere else are sports paths so heavily traveled. 

That's why WBNS-TV provides reserved seats for 
major league baseball, football, hockey, racing and 



a string of special events. That's why "Coach of the 
Year" Woody Hayes is in his eighth season with us 
and Don Mack, a crusty, individualistic hunter and 
fisherman is now in his tenth year "Outdoors" on 
Channel 10. 

The roof nearly blew off the weekend of the state 
high school basketball finals. 200,000 fans wanted 
13,500 seats. WBNS-TV, as a matter of course, 
cancelled a clutch of prime network time and spot 
billing to carry the games. When our underdog North 



High kids broke Middletown's 76-game victory string, 
we were delirious. When they lost the finals in double 
overtime, we just didn't feel like talking about it. 

Sometime remind us to show you all those nice 
letters from folks who appreciated our part in the 
affair. Response such as this is warmer than coin 
to a station that enjoys perfect rapport with its 
Central Ohio neighbors. It also motivates Madisoji 
Avenue to say with authority, "If you want to be 
seen in Central Ohio— WBNS-TV." 



lAfBNS-TV 



Affiliated with The Columbus Dispatch 
316 kw. Represented by Blair TV 




She has such 
engaging 
ways . . . 



be captivated 



response to your 
sales persuasions 

onKOIN-TV 

in Portland 
and 30 surrounding 
Oregon and 
Washington counties 
The pockets 
of the gentlemen 
at CBS-TV 
Spot Sales 
are fairly bulging 
with rave notices 
of her spending 
habits . . . 
and of the 
stratospheric 
ratings 



of h 



atic 



Timebuyers 
at work 



Peggy Hughes Reed, Bryan Houston, Inc., New York, likes being 
an all-media buyer. "We have found that the all-media buying 
system is far more productive for clients. Each individual adver- 
tiser knows that all the media people working on his account are 



for advertising 




KOIN-TV. 



concerned solely with the best media combinatic 
his product, rather than with ways 
to secure a larger percentage of 
the budget for the medium they 
buy." Peggy feels that the all- 
media buying system, by doing 
away with inter-media battles 
within the media department it- 
self, puts the focus of Houston 
media executives where it should 
be: on the development of an ef- 
fective media strategy for the cli- 
ent. "The media strategy for a 
product then develops naturally 
from the product's needs rather than from an) in-built media preju- 
dice." Besides, adds Peggy, all-media buying is far more interesting 
for the buyer who develops broader marketing knowledge by know- 
ing an account's entire media pattern. Peggy also prefers the "closer 
account group and client contact these systems make possible." 



Marvin D. Berns, J. Walter Thompson Co., Chicago, thinks that 
spot radios spectacular growth has made buying this medium one 
of the most difficult media functions. "In many instances we are 
faced with a multitude of market variables — how to properly analvze 
and appK llie>-(' \ariables is the buyer's principal responsibility." 
The rep, Marvin feels, is one of 
the most important sources of in- 
formation on these variables. 
Without him. and the leading 
weekly trade publications, the 
buyer would have to rely solely 
upon the rating services. Marvin 
em|)hasize5 that a statistical sur- 
vey . however well established, is 
not llie exclusive answer to buy- 
ing spot. "We are dealing here 
primarily with audiences — with 
men and women of all age groups 
Though their living patterns are often similar, 
their listening habits vary widely and are difficult to gauge, both 
\Nilhin one region and from one region to the other. The reps are 
auare of local trends, can provide us with this essential data." 




6 SKPTKMBKR 19.58 





THREE MEN IN A TUB..., s a pretty 

outmoded way of getting anywhere in our 

estimation. And the same holds true 

for three spots on a break. 

While some TV stations are still at sea 

about the situation, we have a firm policy that we 

tvill not sell more than 

two spots on any station break. 

KSLA-TV is also a strict subscriber to the NAB 

Television Code of Good Practice. No 

pitches ... no PTs . . . and equallv as important to 

the TV industry as a whole, no rate cutting. 

So please don't ask us to triple 

spot. Our Captain's a stickler for keeping 

his log up-to-date. 




shreveport, la. 



Standard Rate and 



Represented by PAUL H. RAYMER CO., INC. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




ThU U the first in a 



»»/u/ iieople ill iidvertising. Petere. Griffin, Wooiluard. Inc. Spot Telev 



SS MR. THINKBIGLY 



. . . who likes to advertise in a big way, with big names, big shows, big space — 
all the things that he'd been told would put his company in the big time. 

Mr. Thinkbigly did very well! 

Then he discovered that he could get his advertising before bigger audiences by 
putting a good part of his budget in spot television. Now Mr. Thinkbigly is show- 
ing bigger sales, and a bigger profit — and he likes that in a much bigger way. 

Your PGW Colonel would like to send you a copy of "A Local Affair", a booklet 
which will show you how bf'g spot television is on the local scene, where sales 
are made — or lost. 

Just write to Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Spot Television, 250 Park Avenue, N. Y. C. 



^«^ m mi m m im t:^- r^. -^ 





i 


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^^7' ,.:;ri o 1 .. 




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P 




p 








MIDWEST 






EAST 


x~ ' 






r? 












WHO-TV 


Des Moines 


13 


NBC 


WBZ-TV 


Boston 


4 NBC 














WOC-TV 


Davenport 


6 


NBC 


WGR-TV 


Buffalo 


2 ABC 




z 






WEST 






WDSM-TV 


Duluth-Superior 


6 


NBC-ABC 


KYW-TV 


Cleveland 


3 NBC 








KBOI-TV 


Boise 


2 CBS 
9 ABC 


WDAY-TV 


Fargo 


6 


NBC-ABC 


WWJ-TV 


Detroit 


4 NBC 




rt 






KBTV 


Denver 


KMBC-TV 


Kansas City 


9 


ABC 


WJIM-TV 


Lansing 


6 CBS 




U 






KGMB-TV 


Honolulu 


9 CBS 


WISC-TV 


Madison, Wis. 


3 


CBS 


WPIX 


New; York 


11 IND 




a 






KMAU KHBC-TV Hawaii 
KTLA Los Angeles 


5 IND 


WCCO-TV 
WMBD-TV 


Minneapolis-St. Paul 
Peoria 


31 


CBS 
CBS 


KDKA-TV 
WROC-TV 


Pittsburgh 
Rochester 


2 CBS 
5 NBC 




n 


Ij 




KRON-TV 
KIRO-TV 


San Francisco 
Seattle-Tacoma 


4 NBC 
7 CBS 


SOUTHWEST 

KFDM-TV Beaumont 


6 


CBS 


SOUTHEAST 

WCSC-TV Charleston, S 


C. 5 


CBS 


\i 


c 










KRIS-TV 


Corpus Christi 


6 


NBC 


WIS-TV 


Columbia, S 


C. 10 


NBC 


h 










WBAP-TV 


Fort Worth-Dallas 


5 


NBC 


WSVA-TV 


Harrisonburg 


Va 3 


ALL 




fi 

" 










KENS-TV 


San Antonio 


5 


CBS 


WFGA-TV 

WTVJ 

WDBJ-TV 


Jacksonville 
Roanoke 


12 
4 
7 


NBC 
CBS 

CBS 






Peters, Griffip^ , wudju^wAMiu, mc. 
Spot Television 

Pioneer Staiion Represenfatives Since 1 932 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT • HOLLYWOOD • ATLANTA • DALLAS • FT. WORTH • SAN FRANCISCO 



%#^'% 



4 J. 






BALTIMORE 
TV 

SUCCESS STORIES 







by Joe Csida 



^ Sponsor 

Hii backstage 

Pay tv's hand keeps writing 



(i! 



1 



I did better this time. When Sugar Ray Rob- 
inson and Carmen Basilio slugged it out for the 
second time last March, I was in Fort Lauder- 
dale, and wasn't able to buy a seat for the 
closed circuit theater telecast in the whole Miami- 
Fort Lauderdale area. This time I got seats for 
myself and my boy, Joe, at Loew's State in New 
York. For $5 apiece. But even with my $10, 
prexy Irving Kahn and his Closed Communications Division of the 
Teleprompter Corp. didn't do nearly as well this time for the Floyd 
Patterson-Roy Harris fight as they did for the Robinson-Basilio 
brawl. $1,400,000 was approximately the gross take from the closed 
circuit tv show last March, and somewhere around $700,000 was 
probably the gross for the heavyweight title go on August 18. 

All it takes is a champ 

Omit flowers, however. $700,000 plus $202,764 which was the net 
gate reported by promoter Bill Rosensohn to the California Boxing 
Commission, is close to the promoter's $1,000,000 dream gate. In 
the days of old before tv it took tussles like Dempsey versus Car- 
pentier to hit that million. If you saw Patterson push around 
Harris, you know that today it just takes a champ, however inactive 
and untested, and a guy who doesn't even know how to protect him- 
self coming out of a clinch and pay television to hit a million. Well, 
not quite just those ingredients. But those ingredients plus a good, 
workmanlike job of promotion and publicity which, after all, is 
everyday routine for any good showman or show firm. 

For Gillette, Pabst, Ballantine, Winston's and countless other 
sponsors of prize fights, ball games or major sporting events of any 
kind the final tally on the Patterson-Harris pay tv showing is just 
another line the hand writes upon the wall. Pay tv, scribbles the 
hand, looms. Pay tv, in some form, whether via closed circuit in 
theaters or via leased Hnes in the home, or conceivably, ultimately 
via the people's air is a-comin'. 

As far as the sports end of it is concerned, it becomes increas- 
ingly clear that some of the brightest and most experienced of the 
sports observers have no doubt that pay tv is as inevitable as to- 
morrow's sunrise. Here's what Hearst's Bill Corum in his "Sports 
Today" column in the New York Journal American said after the 
Patterson-Harris thing: ". . . The closed circuit tv of the Patterson- 
Harris fight was a financial success even though it suffered by com- 
parison with Robinson and Basilio. It was particularly successful 
for champion Patterson, who will get approximately $310,000, far 
and away the largest purse of his career. No sponsor or group of 
sponsors on network tv would dream of paying Patterson $300,000 
to fight anybody, and especially an unknown such as Harris. . . . 
It shouldn't be hard for anybody to see, therefore, that the major 
fights of the future are not going to be seen on what is called free 
television. The freeloaders will resent this and some Congi 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



probably will beat their gums about it in Washington. But there it 
is and nobody is going to stop it permanently because it is progress, 
which nobody ever stops permanently. . . . Each day we come a 
little closer to the time when those who want to see these sports 
(baseball, football, boxing, etc.) will pay a reasonable fee to watch 
the events in which they are interested. . . . This doesn't mean that 
I think theatre-tv is the final answer, because I don't. Even with 
fights which would appear to be its best bet, the guess here is that it 
is a passing phase in the ultimate change-over to pay-tv, accom- 
panied by free tv in the home. . . ."' 

Old ladies of Keokuk 

Corum's colleague and possibly the most highly respected man 
writing on sports today, Red Smith of the Neiv York Herald Tribune 
had this to say on the situation : 

"If this (referring to the Patterson-Harris fight) wasn't the 
dawn of a new era in boxing, then at least it added a new dimen- 
sion to fight promotion. ... In the past the promoter sold his show 
to radio, home television, or closed-circuit, and cut the fighters in 
on the take. This time, the closed-circuit firm operated, in effect, as 
the promoter. The Teleprompter Corp. made the flat guarantees, 
$150,000 minimum to Patterson plus $60,000 toward the $100,000 
which the champion promised to Harris. . . . Certain comparisons 
are inevitable. The biggest price ever paid by a sponsor of home tv 
was $300,000 for the second Marciano-Walcott fight. Under the 
terms standard then, the champion would get 40 per cent of that 
from the promoter or $120,000. This nmst be compared with Pat- 
terson's $270,000 or better for a dogmeat attraction ... if sponsors 
of home tv couldn't get any championship fights because the theatres 
were getting them all, how long would they continue to pay for sec- 
ondary attractions? . . . For years it has been felt that television was 
creating a vast new body of fight fans, among old ladies in Keokuk 
who never went to an arena. . . . Some day, somehow, it seemed, 
boxing would find a way of cashing in on its new public. It begins 
to appear that closed-circuit shows may offer a partial answer. . . ." 



Pay tv's a comin' 

innninent pay-tv for theatre c 



1 doiTt know how innninent pay-tv for theatre or home is. nor in 
what form it will arrive, but I agree with Corum, Smith and many 
others as to its inevitability. And I believe, as I have stated before, 
that it win present major programing other than sporting events. 
And it appears that some other people feel the same way. Last week 
the stock of Skiatron Electronic and Television Corp., who hold the 
pay-tv rights to the Dodger-Giant games Corum was discussing, hit 
its highest peak, $7 per share. Maybe it's a promotion, and maybe 
it isn't. Maybe Skiatron will be one of pay-tv's hot firms, and 
maybe it won't. But that hand keeps writing. Pay it heed. ^ 



Do y 



Letters to Joe Csida are welcome 

r always agree tvith what Joe Csida says in Sponsor Back- 



stage? Joe and the editors of SPOISSOR will be happy to receive 
and print your comments. Address them to Joe Csida. c/o 
SPOISSOR. 40 East 49th Street, ISetv York 17, I^ew York. 




Here are the NCS #3 ratings; 

Tolal Homes in Area 

KTBS-TV .... .^69..^()() 
Sta. B 32 1.400 

Tolal T\- Homes in Area 

KTB.S-TV .... 249.780 
.Sta. B 221.420 

Momhty Coverage 

KTBS-TV .... 199.470 
Sta. B 179,680 

Weekly Covera:^e 

KTBS-TV .... 193.970 
Sta. B 175.150 

Weekly Day lime Cireulation 

KTBS-TV .... 169.320 
Sla. B . . . . . 154.500 

Daily Daytime Cireulation 

KTBS-TV . . . . 121.010 
Sta. B 113.900 

Weekly Nii;litlime Cireulation 

KTBS-TV .... 192.080 
Sta. B 173.240 

Daily Nii;littime Cireulation 

KTBS-TV .... 150.130 
Sta. B 140.850 

.S7'er//v KTIiS-Tl uith dominant 
Nielsen and dominant ARB . . . the 
lust hay in Shreveport! See your 




SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



WCAU Radio now 

WCAU, Philadelphia: affiliated with The CBS Radio Network since 1927 . . . 



represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales. 50,000 watts, 1210 kilocycles. 



joins the nation's 
most distinguisl^ed 

gtoup of stations. I- TfiepI 




^^^^^^^^^HH f^ 




ations 



'CAU, Philadelphia / KCBS, San Francisco / KNX, Los Angeles /WBBM, Chicago /WCBS, New York / KMOX, St. Louis /WEEI, Boston 



Consider the Family. . . 

how it shares ideas, opinions, tastes. 

Among people living together, attitudes become contagious; approval 

or rejection an unconscious unanimous reaction. 

Properly motivated, the family unit con adopt a favorable viewpoint, 

will respond to a challenge attractively presented. 




BARTELL FAMILY RADIO 

in the past ten years has developed a programing 

attuned to family participation, creating a companionable climate of 

erved acceptance . . . not by one age group alone, but by all members. 

Excessive program appeal to one or another 

of the family is a temptation which 

Bartell Family Radio avoids unrelentingly. A balanced programing 

REACHES THEM ALL 



and that's the ideal audience . 



. . for station loyalty . . . 
for maximum buyership. 



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AMERICA'S FIRST RADIO FAMILY SERVING 15 MILLION BUYERS 

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SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 

Copyright 1958 
>ONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



What will the fourth quarter of 1958 be like for the air media? 

SPONSOR-SCOPE this week took the pulse of the pace-setters, and here's a digest 
of the readings: 

SPOT TV : As bullish as a guy with a block of P&G stock. Broadcasters in the major 
markets may need shoehorns to make room for more business. This will apply 
particularly to daytime. (See more on the daytime theme below.) 

SPOT RADIO: Campaigns will continue to consist of the limited-run variety, but 
there'll be enough of them to make the national tally bigger than the year before. 
Like spot tv, this medium will benefit from those national advertisers who are waiting for 
more explicit signs of an economic upbeat. 

NETWORK TV: plugging all the nighttime holes (even at bargain rates) looks pretty 
improbable, but the shift of advertiser interest to daytime will carry the over-all 
billings beyond 1957. (All networks are confident that they'll finish the quarter with a 
profit.) 

NETWORK RADIO: The bandwagon rush isn't what it was the year before, but 
the outlook is for NBC to run up its biggest quarter since the medium's comeback and 
for CBS to show something of an edge over the like quarter of 1957. 

DETROIT: If any facet of air media will be able to show any glee over the flow from 
this center, it will be spot radio. The auto makers' disposition is to nurse the advertising 
buck and to feed it out sparingly. 



Spot tv is feeling the impact — in a happy way— of this fall's boom in daytime 
network tv. 

Timebuyers this week described to SPONSOR-SCOPE these sudden twists: 

• Daytime minutes have become mighty tough to clear in participating shows 
adjacent to network programs. 

• Even the I.D. situation has become tight. 

• It seems as though scores of accounts suddenly have decided to switch their spot 
strategy to daytime tv, thereby creating an availability jam that's without precedent. 

As a case in point, two of the three Philadelphia stations report that they have 
standing room only in daytime minutes. 

One timebuyer noted that the situation had this embarrassing side: His agency, after 
selling a client on the effectiveness of the daytime minute, now finds itself in the wry 
position of unselling him on that tactic and recommending daytime 20-8econd an- 
nouncements — of which there still is a fair supply. 



Planners in agencies with sizeable durable goods interests are getting a little 
scared by the credit squeeze being put on by Washington. 

It could crimp the boom they have been anticipating for the durable field after the 
first of the year. 

Retail inventories are getting below the safety mark; but if the bankers make it 
tough, this favorable situation could evaporate. 



A&P is making its debut in tv on a national scale via a buy into the NTA Hour 
of Stars and the This Is Alice show. 

It will have two participations in each per week. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



Something to watch during the coming season: Keener preoccupation by the spon- 
sor with the qualitative factors of his tv program as compared to the plain rating. 

The advertiser will be paying more attention to the show's characters in the light of: 
(1) their compatability with the commercial; (2) the ability to integrate them into 
the commercial; and (3) their extra-curricular values (attendance at the sales meetings, 
community affairs, etc.). 

As a P&G agency man put it: "The day's coming when pure efficiency will be just part 
of the quest. The program will become an inherent part of the marketing plans — 
as opposed to something on which you just hang the commercials." 

Observed another adman: "You can predict that the reaction against westerns will 
come first from the advertiser and not the viewer. Their longevity can be measured by 
this factor: Do they increase or decrease the impact of the selling message?" 

Here's a trend among the bigger spot agencies that should interest the seller: 
If the timebuyer isn't familiar with a local program for which a spot avail- 
ability has been submitted, he asks the program department for an opinion. And 
if that department knows nothing about the show, tapes or a description are sought from 
the station. 

Reason: To make sure that the contents of the program are compatible with the 
commercial. 

National spot tv buying shows signs of moving into a real high the next two 
or three weeks. 

Among the products that will spell action are Florida Citrus (B&B), Dentyne (DFS), 
and Rolaids-Clorets (Bates). 

In the cold remedy field. Plough (Lake-Spiro-Shurman) is setting a 22- week schedule for 
St. Joseph's aspirin for children beginning 14 October, and Musterole is heading for a 
15-week run effective 1 December. 

An added starter: Nutrena Dog Food (Bruce Brewer, Minneapolis), eight weeks of 
minutes and chainbreaks in major Midwest markets. Same sponsor is mulling a spot cam- 
paign for its Faultless Starch brand. 

On the national spot radio front, new business this week included: 

Monticello 666 Cold Remedy (Hoyt), 22 weeks in 125 Southern and South Central 

markets; My-T-Fine desserts (BBDO), four weeks of seven-day saturation; Dormeyer Co. 

(John W. Shaw, Chicago), 13 weeks in 14 top markets. 



If you've ever worked for an agency with a Chicago meat-packing account, this item 
should put your nostrils at ease: 

Armour & Co. has moved its general offices from the stockyards to a Loop lo- 
cation (401 N. Wabash). 

Ampex didn't seem perturbed this week by the reasons that WGN-TV, Chicago, 
gave for shelving plans to syndicate Ding Dong School via videotape. 

Word out of the station was that the project had been called off because of "techni- 
cal difficulties beyond WGN's control" — notably "the delay in the development of dupli- 
cating and distribution centers for Ampex tape." 

Ampex's rejoinder: (1) It could be that Ding Dong School was too "tired" a prop- 
erty for syndication; (2) Ampex is still in the process of licking the problem of pro- 
gram duplication, though it is installing its first duplicator for commercials; (3) the right 
engineering manpower is the answer to the duplicating problem. 

Meanwhile Ampex says that by the end of the year the top 50 markets will be equipped 
with its tape machines. (Tv homes in these markets: 38 million.) 

(For further updating on the videotape situation, see page 29.) 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



Over $1.1 million in weekly program costs are involved in the 26 sponsored 
network tv shows scheduled to make their debut in the next few weeks. Thus: 



PROGRAM 


AVG. WEEKLY COST 


PROGRAM 


AVG. WEEKLY COST 




(program only) 




(program only) 


Anybody Can Play 


$21,000 


Naked City 


$37,000 


Behind Closed Doors 


38,000 


Northwest Passage 


48,000 


Milton Berle 


50,000 


Patti Page Show 


40,000 


Brains & Brawn 


45,000 


Pursuit 


45,000** 


Steve Canyon 


44,000 


Ellery Queen 


55,000** 


Derringer 


38,000 


Donna Reed Show 


53,000* 


Desilu Playhouse 


82,000 


Rifleman 


36,000 


Jackie Gleason 


58,000 


Rough Riders 


47,000* 


Peter Gunn 


38,000 


77 Sunset Strip 


82,000** 


Lawman 


38,000 


Ann Sothern Show 


40,000 


Man with Camera 


26,000 


The Texan 


37,000 


Bat Masterson 


38,500 


Wanted— Dead or i 


\live 39,000 


Garry Moore Show 


77,000** 


Ed Wynn Show 


40,000 



* Price includes repeats. ** Price for full hour; sold in segments. 

Of the 26 new network tv shows listed above, 11 fall into the action category. 
By types they break down thus: westerns, 6; adventure, 5; situation comedy, 4; variety, 
; mystery, 3; musical, 2; games, 2; anthology, 1. 
Nineteen will come by way of film. 



Bid and Buy can be had from Revlon for the final quarter of 1958. 

The cosmetic firm would like to bow out of the show for the pre-Christmas season. 
Meantime it's not sure where the show will be located. Two spots under considera- 
tion are on ABC TV, Sunday 9-9:30 p.m., and on NBC TV, Thursday 7:30-8 p.m. 
Net price: $16,500 for the programing and $15,000 for prizes. 



Nostalgia has become somewhat of a drug on tv. 

Admen say that research indicates that the vast majority of viewers has little inter- 
est in the great names of yesteryear. Anyway, the theme is something they can't sell to 
clients. 

Major handicaps are: 1) the kids, who are so important in controlling the dial; and 
2) the young housewife, who prefers to contemplate stars she can identify with her times. 

NCS #3 should prove a boon to the networks in selling longer station lineups. 

Agency media analysts report that the latest Nielsen coverage survey has made this quite 
manifest: The coverage circles for tv stations are getting tighter than ever. 

In other words, viewers are not straining so much for the distant outlet anymore. 

Hence if an advertiser wants to make sure he's got the maximum potential audience within a 
desirable marketing area, it would be prudent to buy a station there. 



CBS TV Station Relations got a mixed reaction from afiiliates on the question 
of extending the one-minute chainbreak concept. 

The network's affiliate board at last week's conference in the Bahamas reported that 
stations in the smaller markets like the idea but it didn't take so well with affili- 
ates in the larger markets. 

Compromise : CBS TV will add another minute chainbreak to the one it's got now 
(scheduled around noon). 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE conHnued . . . 



tlhicago reps should find in Burnett a continuing source of spot revenue even 
after the buying for Kellogg has been wrapped up. 

The bright tidinjis for them: 

Jif Beanut Butter and Camay, which went network a month ago, are returning to 
spot. 

Jif starts this month with a limited budget to supplement network in about 70 mar- 
kets via participations in chihlren's shows, while Camay is likewise slated for a fall 
spot run but with a limited budget. 

P.S.: The buying for Kellogg so far has covered the top 75 markets. The lesser mar- 
kets still are in the transaction mill. 

All in all, Chicago reps — basing their prediction on soundings taken among 
agencies — are looking forward to a record season in spot tv. 

They start off with the thesis that buying spot tv seems to be "in style" this year, then 
get down to such specifics as: 

• Manufacturers have found that they can get stronger merchandising at the local 
level when marketing campaigns are based on a market-by-market concept. 

• The high birth rate of new products demands maximum flexibility in media 
use and efficiency. 

• Today's keynote in product advertising is to concentrate on those markets that of- 
fer the greatest sales potential, instead of scattering it around indiscriminately. 



The beer business this summer has had some strange paradoxes. 

Sales across the country have been up 3.4% over last summer, but the small re- 
gional and local brewers have been crying in their suds. 

The complaints from that group have been loudest in the Northeast. They at- 
tribute their drop in sales to a cold and wet summer, while the big companies credit their 
uplift to a fairly consistent hot season. 

Rural stations, according to Midwest marketing philosophers, stand to benefit from 
a laboratory development affecting pork production. 

Manufacturers of hog medicinals soon will be putting on the market a concoction that 
promises to change the reproductive habits of that animal. 

The porkers usually breed twice annually. Via the new product — and some cross-breed- 
ing — multiplication will be able to take place around the calendar. 



The trend toward more and more planning and buying on a regional level has 
created no small problem among the bigger agencies. 

Facing them is this challenge: 

How to convert their thinking from the national media formula to the media strate- 
gy required for a brand under local conditions. 

The specific task is to devise the best media combination for local situations — but 
without getting the client's national picture out of whack. 

There's also a personal factor in all this strategy: the position of the regional or 
divisional sales manager vs. the national ad manager. Once a district man gets a taste of 
media power — like spending $1.50,000 in his own backyard — it's tough to dislodge him 
and persuade him to return his area's budgetary control to the national ad manager. 

(For an analysis of how the rise of the private label has veered advertising of na- 
tional brands toward greater localization, see 30 August SPONSOR, page 29.) 



For oth«r news coveras* In thia laaua, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
Spot Buys, page 61; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 72; Washington Week, page 67; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 68; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 82; and Film-Scope, page 65. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




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TELEVISION'S FIRST EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Blair-TV represents : 

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WJZ-TV- Baltimore 
WNBF-TV-Binghamton 
WHDH-TV- Boston 
WBKB- Chicago 
WCPO-TV- Cincinnati 
WEWS- Cleveland 
WBNS-TV- Columbus 
KFJZ-TV-Dallas-Ft. Worth 
WXYZ-TV- Detroit 
KFRE-TV- Fresno 
WNHC-TV- 

Hartford-New Haven 



KTTV- Los Angeles 
WMCT- Memphis 
WDSU-TV- New Orleans 
WABC-TV- New York 
WOW-TV - Omaha 
WFIL-TV-Phildelphia 
WIIC- Pittsburgh 
KGW-TV- Portland 
WPRO-TV- Providence 
KGO-TV- San Francisco 
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It Happened 
In Memphis! 



Bert Ferguson 




A liig success stor\ began in 
Memphis, just ten years ago when 
WDIA. only SO.OOO' watt station in 
the area, began to program exclu- 
sively to Negroes. Now WDIA 
reaches— and sells— 1,237,686 Ne- 
groes! Almost 10% of the nation's 
entire Negro population! 

The Negro market — as reached 
by WDIA— is the biggest market of 
its kind in the eiilirc <(iuMti\. Ne- 
groes in WDIAV big listening-buy- 
ing audience earned $(> 16.294,100 
last year. Negroes make up 40% of 
the Memphis market. And they 
spent, on the average, 80% of this 
income on consumer goods. 

MARKET UNLIMITED! 

WDIA's national advertisers in- 
clude: THE BORDEN COMPANY. 
COLGATE-PALMOLIVE COM- 
PANY. NATIONAL BISCUIT 
COMPANY. BRISTOL-MYERS 
COMPANY. Gl LF OIL. 



Memphis N 
lo WDIA! 1. 
1958 Nielsen 
dav— Saturday 
overwhelming 
point, than St 


egroes listen most 
1 the March-April 
Illation Index, Sun- 
WDIA totaled an 
52% more rating 
ilion B: 


Station 


T< 


la! Rating 
l>oinls 


\M)I\ 




.-.2K.2 


Sla. It 




.i.W.I 


Sla. i. 




281.1 


Sta. D 




278.8 


Sta. E 




1S7.1 


Sla. F 




lOl.S 


Sla. <; 




71.1 



Drop us a line. Let us prove to 
>ou: If you want acceptance — and 
buying action — in the Memphis 
Negro Market. \(.u want WHIM 

WDIA is represented nationally 
by John E. Pearson Company 

ECMONT SONDERLING, President 
HAROLD WALKER, Vicr-Prr .slf/..nf, Sales 



m 

1 0^ 



4^tli and 
kViadison 



Kudos for Commentary 

On behalf of Atlantis Sales Corpora- 
tion our creative group and our ac- 
count group, thanks for the kind 
words you had for French's Instant 
Mashed Potato film commercials in 
your August 16th "Commercial Com- 
mentary." There is no need to de- 
scribe the "lift" that is provided by 
such acknowledgment. Mr. McMillin 
is to be congratulated on his keen anal- 
ysis of French's Instant Potato market- 
ing problems and his relating of com- 
mercial elements to the problem. It 
was amazingly accurate and followed 
our copy platform almost to the letter. 
His judgment is further endorsed 
by the consumer reaction we have had 
since broad advertising — all television 
— began one year ago. In many quar- 
ters, the sales progress of French's 
Instant Potato has been called "the 
grocery success story of the year." 
Within that time our product has 
moved into that exclusive inner circle 
of products that sell at the rate of bet- 
ter than one case weekly in the average 
supermarket. 

W. D. Yeager, Jr. 

/. Walter Thompson 

New York 

Rate ruckus 

(Congratulations are in order for the 
excellent article in your August 16th 
issue focusing attention on the deplor- 
able rate situation. 

Tracy Locke Company of Dallas also 
(!cscr\(s praise for their very construc- 
li\c approach to the situation which is 
in (lin< t contrast to that of man\ 
olhers. 

WOnl it be wonderful for everybody 
( oncerned — advertising agencies, rep- 
resentatives, and stations — when there 
is one rate applying to all? Keep up 
I be good work! 

Charles F. Dilcher 

Allanla 

John Blair & Company 

Ffom the author 

Ma) be you think I shouldn't have been, 
but I was a little amazed at the re- 
s|)onse I got from my "How to Im- 
prove Your Community Relations" ar- 



ti< le in the July 26th issue of sponsor. 

Roughly 50 letters have so far come 
in asking for reprints, or telling me how 
the writer intends to use the sugges- 
tions, or asking where to get the re- 
corded "Economic Briefs" which, may- 
be not so incidentally, were recorded 
by George V. Denny, Jr. of American 
Town Meeting fame. 

But even more gratifying than these, 
were many letters of greeting from old 
friends from all over the country, some 
of whom I had not been in touch with 
for years. 

SPONSOR, I can testify, really gets 
around. 

H. E. Ringgold 
New York 



tiy recorded 


"Eeon 


omics 


n Brief" me 


o so by e. 


ntactin 


g Ton 


EUsworth 


th St., Ron 


m 540 




York City. 



SPONSOR Directory 

Kindly send me my copy of sponsor's 
5-City Tv/Radio Directory— 1958-59 
edition. Thank you very much for a 
great magazine — I enjoy sponsor 
every week. 

Michael J. Ludgate 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

I would be much obliged if you could 
send me a copy of your latest radio & 
tv directory. Certainly in the past 
number of years we couldn't operate 
without it. 

Henry E. Karpus, 

vice president, tv/ radio 

E. W. Reynolds, Ltd. 



We would like to point out an omis- 
sion from your recently issued "5-City 
Tv/Radio Directory." Under the head- 
ing of Detroit you have left out the 
Maxon Inc. listing. We feel sure this 
is an oversight because the agency's 
name is included in both the New York 
and Chicago listings. 

Assuming that you will be re-issuing 
this directory from time to time, we 
would appreciate correction in the next 
printing. 

P. C. Beatty 

media dir., Maxon Advtg. 

Detroit 



6 skptkmrkr 1958 



An editorial voice 
that is 




KFM 



k 



9PECIAL QERIES "Editorial Voice" 

1 Q t; g 



•l 





N0«-CLA55ICAL MUSIC '^Tke Mornm^ mch" 



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Last summer KFAB started a broad, new concept in 
midwest radio. One of the key features of this crisp, new 
programing was the award-winning "Editorial Voice" 
speaking out on important issues of the day. Another was 
the bright, provocative morning program, "The Morning 
Watch" . . . also an award winner. Programs and features 
...like "The Morning Watch" and "The Editorial Voice," 
combined with top rated personalities, have accounted for 
the big audience swing to KFAB in the Big Omaha Mar- 
ket .. . the BIGGEST award of all. 

Get all the facts on the new KFAB from Petry — or 
from E. R. Morrison, KFAB's General Sales Manager. 



BASIC NBC 



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(VARD PETRY & CO.. INC. 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



WCAU'TV 

serving the nation's ^^'■ 

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Represented, as before, 
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! 




Tv's Revolutionary Videotape 



It's hard to believe that a two-inch wide plastic ribbon can 
revolutionize a multi-million dollar industry. But that is just what is 
happening in television. 

The ribbon is videotape which, in about every nine inches 
of its length, packs one second of sight and sound ready for play-back 
a fraction of a second later. 

Since it burst upon the tv scene a little over two years ago, 
it has stirred up imagination, creativity and — in some areas — bitter con- 
troversy. It has already changed television programing and advertising 
at national and local levels. Yet the revolution it fomented has only 
begun. Where it will end — if ever — ^is anybody's guess. 

To advertiser and broadcaster, videotape holds out the 
promise of economy, flexibility and immediacy. Indeed it has already 
begun to deliver them. Advertisers are finding economy and flexibility iti 
taped commercials. Networks licked time-zone and Daylight Saving 
problems with tape. Those local stations that have installed recorders are 
taking advantage of tape's immediacy both in news coverage and pro- 
ducing on-the-spot commercials for local advertising clients. Tape, as 
will be shown later, is even opening up a whole new technique in the buy- 
ing and selling of air time. 

Now, in the U.S. there are slightly more than 100 Ampex 
recorders in use. Their users are a half-dozen commercial producing 
firms, all three tv nets, and 43 individual stations. By year's end, Ampex 
- president Neal K. McNaughton predicts there will be 250 recorders in 
use, "substantially in local station application." Camden, N. J. plant of 
RCA also is turning out recorders — for color. 

With such industry acceptance (amazing since each b&w 
unit costs about $50,000 ) , sponsor has set out to learn what the industry 
is doing with tape and how it will shape television's future. 



PART A ONE 
OF A TWO-PART SERIES 



Where tape stands today 



E,<■r^ V, 


d ol 


tin- t, initnstn se 


•nis destined 


tn ,,;■! 


Ihr 


rfirr, „, ri.leoUn 


r which in 


sllghlh 


more 


than luo u'ors 


has pcnetra- 


ted nets 


, ad 


agencies, prodiic 


page 30 


Hoiv national clients use 


tape 


East Co 


ast. 


(Test Coast, all 


around the 


land m 


ijor 


accounts arc tarn 


ng to tape 


for -liv 




mwc reals. Here 


are reports 






iicticorl. lupitals 


of the US. 
page 32 



NEXT WEEK 

How the individual stations are using 
their recorders. Of especial importance 
nill be the results of a sunder of videO' 
tape users conducted by one of the 
largest broadcast firms in the business 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Television heads for transition as vide 



^ A half dozen tv commercial producers, the three 
networks and 43 stations are the spearhead for tape 

^ Advertisers are quick to grasp its possibilities, are 
starting to move in on national as well as on local levels 



f\n atomic bomb detonated in the 
Anipex Corp. suite at Chicago's Con- 
rad Hilton hotel during the April 1956 
convention of NARTB (now NAB) 
could not have had more far-reaching 
effects on broadcast advertising than 
did the unveiling of the Ampex video- 
tape recorder. Within five days, this 
West Coast manufacturer had over $4 



million in advance orders on its books. 
Why? What could possibly explain 
such spontaneoeus acceptance? What 
brought some admen and tv producers, 
who had planned to forego the conven- 
tion, suddenly winging into Chicago? 
It wasn't as if the idea of videotape 
was new. A number of laboratories 
had already shown that sight and 



sound could be mixed on the same 
tape that previously had been in wide 
use for sound alone. The only trouble 
had been that to do it you'd wind up 
with reels of tape the size of cart- 
wheels which would have to be changed 
every few minutes. The Ampex "bomb- 
shell" was the fact that pix-and-audio 
could be packed on practical-size reels. 
For the tv industry, the invention was 
comparable with the discovery of pas- 
teurization or penicillin in medicine. 

In the two-and-one-half years since, 
Ampex has produced and delivered 
about $8 million worth of recorders 
alone, not to mention its sales of tape 
and parts. By the beginning of 1959, 
this volume should swell to $12.5 mil- 



I'r.Hlii, , r- take up tape: Fi 




al at its New York studios: promotes its new service as "Delayed Live Broadcasts" 





leiape gets into the act 



STATUS 

REPORT 

VIDEOTAPE 



lion. An all-out, crash program has 
enabled the company to turn out, since 
last November, about 20 videotape re- 
corders a month — or about one each 
day. In its last fiscal year, Ampex 
did a gross business of $30 million; 
the year before, its volume amounted 
to $18 million. This does not mean 
that recorders have accounted for the 
lion's share of this gain since the com- 
pany also is heavy in instrumentaliza- 
tion (from giant computers to tiny 
gadgets that fit into the nose-cones of 
guided missiles). But the videotape 
equipment has played a substantial 
role, and a total of 150 recorders are 
now in operation. 

So now that videotape has gained 
such an enviable beachhead and its in- 
vasion of tv has begun, the question 
is: Where does it go from here? The 
answer: Almost anywhere. 

Already a number of national net- 
work tv advertising clients and their 
agencies are using tape commercials. 
Some are: Colgate's Palmolive soap 
(Ted Bates), Liggett & Myers' Chester- 
field cigarettes (Mc-E), P&G's Tide 
(B&B), Lever's Imperial margarine 
(FC&B), Brown & Williamson's Kool 
cigarettes (Bates), Sealtest Dairy (N. 
W. Ayer), Allstate Insurance (Leo 
Burnett), Lever's Lux (JWT), Kel- 
logg's cereals (Burnett). Others join 
the parade every week. In September, 
GM's Buick will do three tapes through 
Mc-E at NBC's Burbank, Calif., tape 
center. Flexibility is a major factor 
in many of the decisions that led such 
advertisers into tape. 

"With tape, there's no frost on your 
tv commercials when the robins are 
chirping outside," Ed Cashman, radio/ 
tv vice president of Hollywood's FC&B 
agency, told SPONSOR. For Edsel, this 
agency taped commercials for Wagon 
Train, also for last fall's Crosby-Sina- 
tra-Clooney Edsel Show. "Film would 
have taken time to process," Cashman 
went on. "The flexibility of tape al- 
lows you to change copy, selling points, 
add statistics, bring out new features 
almost immediately." 

Add to this flexibility such other 
tape advantages as (1) economy ef- 



CLEARING AWAY SOME COBWEBS ABOUT TAPE 



All the Westinghouse Broadcasting stations 
have recorders. Here are some things WBC 
has found out about a videotape operation: 



Tape: A reel of tape carries an hour's pro- 
graming, costs $300, but can be erased and 
re-used 100 times without loss of quality 



For repairs : Many components such as re- Rewind : A videotape holding a quarter-hour 

sistors, tubes, etc., are available at any sup- show can be rewound and ready for play- 

ply store. Heads, of course, come from factory back in as little as 10 or 12 seconds 



Heads: Recording heads are lasting about 
aw hours. Original head costs $1,200; af- 
ter that they are replaced at $300 each 



Switching reels: On the recorder, one 
can switch reels of videotape in less than 
30 seconds — about the time of a chain break 



fected through taping a string of com- 
mercials while camera crews are on 
hand at the studio, (2) the spontane- 
ity feeling of a "live" commercial yet 
free of fluff perils due to taping ahead 
of air time, (3) The ability to fit 
shooting schedules to the convenience 
of stars who might be otherwise un- 
able to leave a Broadway stage to do 
a live nighttime tv commercial, (4) the 
immediacy factor which permits an 
advertiser to make a last-minute copy 
change in a commercial just before 
taking to the air. 

As with goose and gander, what's 
good for the advertiser is good for the 
broadcaster. Stations and networks 
are discovering the same advantages in 
tape that are advertisers and agencies. 
It is like a child's erector set toy from 
which the list of things that can be 
built is virtually endless. 

"Videotape opens up a whole new 
future of opportunities," says Donald 
H. McGannon, president of Westing- 
house Broadcasting Co. (Each of the 
WBC stations owns an Ampex record- 
er) . "The industry has been headed 
in the direction of automation; tape is 
a big step in that direction." Like 
others of the 43 stations that own re- 
corders, WBC outlets are constantly 
discovering new ways to put their 
equipment to work. On-the-spot news 



coverage, elimination of kines, pre-air- 
tiine show production, intra-station 
communications, on-location commer- 
cials for local clients, sales presenta- 
tions to clients who may see exactly 
what they get if they buy, are just a 
few of many station applications. 

Meanwhile the networks have used 
tape to solve the costly, long-vexing 
problems of time zones and Daylight 
Saving (53 tape recorders are cur- 
rently in use among the three webs). 
Now it is possible for them to keep 
their programing oil affiliates' "clock 
time" through delayed operations, 
eliminating the never-quite-satisfactory 
kines. At the same time they are find- 
ing their videotape useful for program 
development and in the production of 
commercials for clients. 

Six commercial producers are pro- 
ducing or about to produce taped tv 
ads. They are: Filmways, Elliot, Lin- 
ger and Elliot, Telestudios, Guild 
Films, General Videotape Service, and 
Videotape Productions. The latter is 
being financed in part by Ampex. 

In the area of film producers and 
talent unions probably more contro- 
versy and confusion about videotape 
has been raised than in any other. 

Among the unions, especially AFTRA 

and SAG, the problem is jurisdiction. 

{Please turn to page 80) 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Agencies and nets move into tape 



^ Flexibility and economy are some key factors that 
are leading network television accounts into videotape 

^ Leo Burnett, J. Walter Thompson, McCann-Erickson 
are just a few agencies who have atlded tape to techniques 



I V commercial producers, networks 
and stations that have installed re- 
cording equipment report a wave of 
interest from agencymen and ad- 
vertisers. Much of this interest is ex- 
pressed in questions. How much will 
it cost? What can it do for us? 

Answers to such queries are coming 
through daily as recorder owners con- 
tinue experiments and as major ad- 
vertising clients begin to move into 
videotape. 

Here are some of the things that 
national advertisers have learned 
about tape and the ways they have 
applied it: 

J. Walter Thompson claims two 
firsts for color tape commercials for 
Lever Bros.' Lux Soap. These color 
tapes rolled into The Price Is Right 
show not only were the first color 
tapes ever integrated into a live show, 
but the occasion also marked the first 
time that tape, color or b & w, had 
been integrated into a live show via 
a transcontinental hookup. 

The commercial is rolled into the 
live N. Y. show on a feed from 
Hollywood. Agency producer Tom de 
Paolo, who directs the commercials, 
says they disproved the "deterioration" 
rumor as far as he is concerned. "Four 
commercials are done at one session," 
dc Paolo explained, "and the quality 
is just as good five weeks later when 
the fourth one is run as it was right 
after taping." 

De Paolo figures an hour to do 
each commercial; it usually takes less. 
They do four at a time at NBC tape 
center in Burbank, Calif. Two similar 
Lux sets are set up. While one is in 



use, the other is being dressed. He 
has never had to do more than three 
takes to get it right. 

First of these taped Lux commercials 
was telecast 24 July. JWT's reason 
for going to tape: "to keep com- 
mercials fresh, flexible and foolproof," 
according to de Paolo. 

Also out at Burbank, Buick will be 
shooting three tapes under the direc- 
tion of Charles Powers, in charge of 



West Coast production for McCann- 
Erickson. 

The reason behind Mc-E's putting 
three of Buick's 1959 models' intro- 
ductory announcements on videotape 
is that they want some commercials 
with a "live" feel to more or less 
balance those with a "film" feel. One 
will be taped for the 19 September 
NBC TV Bob Hope Show, one for 22 
Sept. NBC TV Tales of Wells Fargo, 
and one for the 19 September ABC 
TV Buick Action Theater. 

The latter show is a re-run, and 
since it is on ABC it means that NBC 
tape will almost certainly be rolled 
into an ABC show. According to 
Powers, no union problem exists (both 
networks are NABET), and he antici- 
pates no AFTRA-SAG difficulties. But 




Color tape produced at NBC center in Burbank and integrated into live show from New York 
via transcontinental hookup was this "first" by J. Walter Thompson for Lux Soap. Above 
( imunercial of the "Lux Girl" is one of four done at same time. Pic is a kine from tape 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




certain minor technical difficulties are 
now being ironed out by Jack Burrell, 
manager of technical operations for 
NBC in Burbank and Ted Grenier, 
chief engineer for radio/tv at ABC 
Western division. Both men revealed to 
SPONSOR they are looking forward to 
establishing such recording standards 
as "tip projection" (distance between 
head drum and the tip of the recording 
head itself). 

What are such commercial tapings 
costing advertisers? A New York 
agency tv film producer passed along 
to SPONSOR a rule-of-thumb estimate: 
You can figure for an hour of live 
commercial time at a network about 
$500 plus another $100 for tape— 
that's about $600 total." (This does 
not include talent, etc.). 

In the midwest, agencies and clients 
also are beginning to move into tape 
commercials. Leo Burnett Co. is among 
the pioneers, feeling that videotape 



gives the "spontaneity" of a live com- 
mercial. They also feel it affords 
flexibility, a chance to plan ahead, 
and an opportunity to work when the 
talent is available. 

According a Burnett spokesman, the 
biggest advantage of tape is the time 
economy effected along with another 
factor — "it is cheaper than film." 

For Kellogg, Burnett has taped 
commercials to be used in CBS TV 
What's My Line? The reasoning be- 
hind the move: The show originates 
in New York City's Mansfield Theater 
where there is very limited space for 
doing commercials live. CBS TV, on 
Sunday nights, is a very busy opera- 
tion and remote studios for live com- 
mercial productions are at a premium. 
So in order to still do "live" com- 
mercials for the Kellogg-sponsored 
show, Burnett went to videotape. The 
agency has also taped Allstate Insur- 
ance commercials for Playhouse 90. 



S. Hooper White, JWT tv producer 
in Chicago, had this to say about 
videotape: "It is the biggest thing in 
the industry today and will ultimately 
revolutionize the production end of 
television. It is an electronic device 
perfected for an electronic medium — 
tv. This is the key to the importance 
of videotape." White holds out as one 
major advantage the fact that tape 
will permit fluff-free live commercials, 
and adds, "We predict that agency 
producers of live commercials, as well 
as clients who foot the bills, will live 
years longer because of this one ability 
of videotape alone." 

While advertisers and. commercial 
producers daily learn more about tape, 
the networks and stations find out new 
things about it too. Next week's re- 
port will detail how it is aiding them 
in program development, client serv- 
ices and in increased ad sales. ^ 




TIPS ON TAPE PRODUCTION 



IKey to a good videotape commercial is 
■ showmanship. Film has long managed 
this but "live" commercials sometimes come 
up weak in this. area. Care must be used 

2 Clients have a right to expect good light- 
■ ing in commercials. Lighting technique 
for film differs sharply from lighting for live 
commercials, which really are what tape is 

3 Film lighting is dimensional, tends to be 
■ dramatic. For tape commercials, however, 
it is acceptable to use a more flat lighting 

4 Be sure there are enough tv cameras on 
■ hand for a tape commercial. Three image- 
orthicon type (at $15,000 each) are not too 
many. Also handy for tape commercials, 
especially for remotes, vidicon miniature 
cameras (tripod or pistol grip) at about $3,250 



5 Producers of tv tape commercials will 
■ have to get used to very fast thinking 
"on their feet." Unlike film, tape sequence 
should run through without a break. So 
producers must be ready to plan well ahead 



Program development is an important use of tape at ABC TV 



from net's new show, 87th Precinct, were shot on location in Wall Street area with 10 cameras, 
fed back through mobile unit to tape recorder at ABC. Result: "live" realism on location 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



What a timebuyer can do to get ahead 



^ In today's ad agency, with radio/tv predominant, 
the tiniebuyer's role is more important than ever before 

^ Here's how successful advertising men have climbed 
the timebuying ladder— and the advice they have to offer 



Iwlanagement sources at almost every 
major agency report one startling fact 
about the timebuying profession: there 
are more opportunities today for time- 
bu)ers to develop and grow into im- 
portant executive spots than there ever 
have been in history. 

Compared to a decade ago, when 
timebuying was often a frustrating, 
blind-alley job, changes in agency 
operations have opened up vast new 
areas for the ambitious young media 
man who knows how to take advantage 
of the situation. Here's what's been 
happening: 



• With radio/tv now the dominant 
billing in most large agencies, the 
air media man has assumed far greater 
stature. 

• Media departments are now work- 
ing hand in hand with the all-impor- 
tant marketing divisions, and are much 
closer to client sales problems. 

• As agency production and con- 
trol of radio/tv programs has dropped 
off, media departments are now taking 
over many program-buying functions 
once held by radio/tv departments. 

• The growing importance of spot 
in new "pinpoint" marketing strategies 



is forcing media men to know more 
about the over-all advertising picture — 
and opening up new opportunities for 
them. 

How can the individual timebuyer 
take advantage of this unprecedented 
situation? What must he do, how must 
he prepare himself for new, and greater 
responsibilities? To get the answers, 
SPONSOR talked to the men who know, 
executives who started as timebuyers 
and are now top brass in their fields. 
(See box of "Do's and Don'ts" for 
a summary of their advice.) 

In making this special study, SPON- 
SOR was struck by the fact that so 
many upper echelon executives have 
come up through the timebuying ranks. 
Lest anyone doubt the sheer numbers 
and considerable success of former 
timebuyers, take this quick glance up 
and down Madison Avenue: 

There's William E. Steers, president 
of Doherty, Clifford, Steers and Shen- 



Do's and Don'ts for Timebuyers 



i DO'S 

3 1) Develop a reputation: Do more than what's ex- 

i pected and have suggestions and ideas ready. Spend the 

g client's money as if it were your own. 

■ 2) Learn other areas: Find out about print, account 

S work, and delve into sales, marketing, distribution prob- 

g lems. Get answers to the "why's." 

§ 3) Know research: Learn enough math to handle 

3 numerical problems, and be familiar with research to 

3 evaluate any kind of presentation. 

^ 4) Communicate with your supervisor, discussing 

§1 your work with him regularly. Exchange opinions and 

s ideas with others, too. 

=, 5) Get out in the field whenever possible. Meet sta- 

= tion personnel and learn about local market conditions. 

6) Read the trade papers to keep yourself thoroughly 
/ informed of what's going on in your area. 

7) Socialize: You can often learn more over lunch 
IL than at the oflice. Be friendly; future contacts can arise 
k from least expected places. 

g 8) Judge your own work by evaluating the kind of 

g assignments you get. Important, interesting assignments 

g indicate you are well regarded. 



DON'TS 

1) Don't buy '"by-the-numbers:" Don't rely on 
routine figures as the only basis for buying. Find out 
more than the ratings and CPM's. 

2) Don't make enemies: This natural word of advice 
is frequently ignored, but people who dislike you can 
be amazingly damaging to your career. 

3) Don't be "itchy" to get ahead. Many young time- 
buyers are actually held back by their own impatience. 

4) Don't blind yourself to the mechanical routines 
of your function. Find out the reasons and necessities 
for all aspects of the job. 

5) Don't quit in a hurry: Even if you have an at- 
tractive job offer, check with your supervisor. Many 
miss important promotions this way. 

6) Don't assume you're a natural salesman: While 
many timebuyers have become top salesmen, don't forget 
special skills are needed to sell. 

7) Don't bog down: Even if you feel your work is 
not immediately rewarded, keep in mind it's usually 
being noted and remembered. 

8) Don't "know it all": Don't decide you alone have 
the last word. But don't rely completely on advice (like 
this article.) Find your own way. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



THESE SIX MEN STARTED AS TIMEBUYERS 



field; Edgar P. Small, v.p. in charge 
of personnel and a director, Ted Bates; 
Wilfred S. King, v.p. and director, J. 
M. Mathes; Robert F. McNeil, presi- 
dent of Thompson-Koch Agency, and 
Carlos Franco of Carlos Franco Asso- 
ciates — to mention just a few ex-time- 
buyers who are now top agency 
administrators. 

Look at media. Among v.p.'s of 
major agencies, William F. Dekker of 
McCann-Erickson and Frank Kemp of 
Compton are both ex-timebuyers. 

Dozens of today's account execu- 
tives, such as George Kern of McCann- 
Erickson and Gertrude Scanlon of 
BBDO, earned valuable training buy- 
ing time. 

And that's not all. Timebuyers have 
gone into some of the best jobs with 
representatives, broadcasters and ad- 
vertisers. There's William Maillefort, 
v.p. in charge of radio at Edward 
Petry, and C. A. (Fritz) Snyder at 
Hollingbery. Hubbell Robinson, Jr., 
executive v.p. in charge of CBS TV 
programs, was once a timebuyer. Ditto 
for Howard S. Meighan, now with 
Ampex; as well as Jack Latham, a 
Philip Morris brand manager, and 
Stanley Pulver, now Colgate-Palmolive 
division media manager. 

Here are some of their comments 
and tips to rising young media men 
and women: 

"Timebuying can lead to a good 
future in media. It's also fine back- 
ground for account work or selling 
time," states William C. Dekker, media 
v.p. of McCann-Erickson. 

"Never buy by-the-numbers. Always 
contribute as much as you can to the 
agency's over-all operation," says Car- 
los Franco, head of his own agency. 

"Get out there in the field. See 
stations and meet their personnel. Find 
out for yourself about market con- 
ditions," advises Jack Latham, brand 
manager for PM's new Mayfield ciga- 
rettes. 

"Always be aware of what's happen- 
ing in the industry, and come up with 
ideas and suggestions. Learn enough 
mathematics to handle numerical prob- 
lems and enough media research to 
make an intelligent evaluation of any 
presentation. Don't pay so much at- 
tention to your "next job" that you 
become careless on the one you have 
now. Check regularly with your super- 
visor on the quality of work you're 



doing. Never accept another job offer 
before finding out what's planned 
right where you are." These valuable 
suggestions are made by Frank Kemp, 
v.p. and media director of Compton. 

The social aspect of the timebuyer 
is stressed by another Madison Ave- 
nue v.p. "Lunch with others. Get 
around and find the whole picture. 
Forget your ego and merge into the 
group. Be sympathetic. Make the 
client feel you're spending his money 
the way you would your own." 

One agency executive puts forth this 
hint: "The timebuyer's greatest em- 
ployment agency is the station." 

An account executive who trained 
for a decade in media gives these tips: 
"There's opportunity galore for time- 
buyers in normal agency expansion. 
Today the timebuyer must be a spe- 
cialist who knows many facts and 
figures in a fast changing business — 
for example, radio's comeback and the 
big trend toward spot. Right now the 
timebuyer has a far greater salary 
future than ever before. 

Authoritative advice from several 
ex-timebuyers now wearing v.p. stripes 
choruses this main theme: "Work 
hard, dig deep and find out what's 
behind the things you do. Relate your 
work to sales, marketing, distribution, 
merchandising and all advertising. 
Most importantly, build your reputa- 
tion. It's exactly what a man is worth 
— no less, no more." 

This insistence that a timebuyer 
should know more than his own phase 
of the agency business, is character- 
istic of nearly all top-brass comment. 

"Learn about copy, art, programs, 
commercials, and exactly how they fit 
into your own operations," advises 
one veteran plans board head. "You 
need this knowledge to make really 
sound buying decisions, and the more 
familiar you are with the rest of the 
agency is doing, the quicker you'll 
catch the eyes of top management." 

On the negative side one media v.p. 
said this : "Don't wait to be told before 
doing something or learning a new 
area. Take the initiative and develop 
your own ability." 

Finally, and most important, say 
these experts, build your reputation. 
"It's exactly what a man's worth that 
counts. Show that you have it." ^ 

William E. Ste« 

Clifford, Steers 




William C. Dekker, vice president in 
charge oi media, McCann-Erickson 



/-^ 




Jack Latham, Mayfield brand man. 
ager, Philip Morris 




Stanley M. Pulver, TA media man- 
ager, Colgate-Palmolive 




Hubbell Kobinson, Jr., 

president programs, CBS TV 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Len Firestone sports one of the newest merchandibing gimmicks: functional point of sale promotions 



Why merchandise a syndicated show? 



^ This year, spot advertisers will spend more than ever 
before to merchandise syndicated shows in local markets 

^ Here are some of the basic reasons for investments 
and some tips on how to utilize merchandising dollars 



I his fall, sponsors of syndicated se- 
ries will be spending up to SIOO^OOO 
each on the merchandising of their 
shows. 

Though there are many individual 
reasons for these merchandising ex- 
penditures, .bear in mind these essen- 
tials: (1) a spot buyer wants all the 
glamour and publicity that he feels a 
network advertiser automatically comes 
by; and (2) he feels he is in a better 
position than a network advertiser to 
communicate with his dealer and con- 
sumer on a local level. 

In merchandising any show, a spon- 
sor is looking for whatever extras he 
can get. These extras include: 

(1) Strong sj)onsor and product 
identification in a specific market. 

(2j Enhancement of the basic tv in- 
vestment, at reasonable cost, through- 
out the rest of the week. 



(3) Prestige, through identification 
with a particular star and his show. 

(4) Enthusiasm from those that are 
logically most interested in the series' 
success — i.e., employees. 

(5) A relating of the on-the-air 
sales message to the actual point-of- 
purchase, also via stars and show title. 

(6) An opportunity to carry a par- 
ticular selling theme into every medi- 
um of advertising. 

The actual tools of merchandising 
are the result of combined thinking by 
advertiser, agency, syndicator, and, 
oft-times, station. A syndicator, espe- 
cially, will go to all ends to assure 
the success of an advertiser's merchan- 
dising investment. First of all, it's a 
worlhw'hile investment toward a possi- 
ble renewal — and the syndicator's big- 
gest return lies beyond the first year 
of production. Secondly, he realizes 



that, all other things being equal, a 
promotable show is easier to sell in the 
first place. 

Ziv-TV's retail action plan for spon- 
sors of its Mackenzie's Raiders series 
is an excellent example. 

The plan, in the words of sales vice- 
president M. J. (Bud) Rifkin, is de- 
signed specifically to : 

• Keep dealers constantly aware of 
sponsors' sales efforts. 

• Increase identification of the show 
with a sponsor's name, product and 
retail outlet. 

• Combat sponsors' in-store promo- 
tion problems, such as competition 
from other suppliers for wall, counter, 
and window display space in stores. 

The mechanics of the plan, as sup- 
plied by Ziv: highly functional promo- 
tion pieces, such as signs announcing 
store hours, evening and weekend 
shopping hours, holiday openings and 
closings, price tags, shopping bags, 
etc., all sporting a reminder to cus- 
tomers to watch the Mackenzie show 
under the auspices of the sponsoring 
company. 

In addition to such merchandising 
schemes devised by syndicators, certain 
types of advertisers have developed 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



ways to put their own selling methods 
to merchandising advantage. 

Here are a few capsule cases of how 
specific types of advertisers have ap- 
plied merchandising techniques to fit 
a particular marketing problem in a 
particular inarket: 

• A regional oil company, Conti- 
nental Oil, uses the theme of its show 
to stimulate excitement among its deal- 
ers (see April 12 sponsor). In the 65 
markets where Conoco ( via Benton & 
Bowles) sponsors CBS TV Film's 
Whirlyhirds, the company has featured 
helicopter rides at local and regional 
dealers' meetings. 

• A local dairy concern in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, Harmony Farms, has taken 
to its milk cartons to keep a constant 
reminder of Ziv's Sea Hunt in front of 
its customers. The company has pre- 
pared a special two-color carton, fea- 
turing a Sea Hunt reminder message. 

Regional General Baking's ( BBDO ) 
Silent Service ICNP) merchandising 
campaign in Philadelphia is two-fold: 
(1 1 Its Bond Bread end seals featuring 
a tune-in reminder are aimed at the 
consumer, and (2) employee visits to 
submarines, employee screenings, sub- 
marine pins and teaser lines for its 
route men, etc., all aim toward creating 
employee enthusiasm. 

• Banks, which have become heavy 
users of syndication, are rapidly catch- 
ing up with product sponsors on the 
merchandising front. Their specific 
problem: to ease their traditionally 
conservative label and humanize their 





Architect of the i 

"taclicar' and "str; 



radio strategy for Sterling Silversmiths of America, that uses 
approaches, is Gerald Arthur, v.p. in charge of media, F&S&R 



How radio sells a quality image for sterling silver 



\^ hanging an old image by build- 
ing a new one just cries for fre- 
quency." 

This reasoning gave birth to a half- 
million dollar radio campaign by 
Sterling Silversmiths of America, a 
group of sterling silver Hatware man- 
ufactures who are banded together for 
an all-industry promotion. 

The story began last year, when Dr. 
Ernest Dichter conducted a depth study 
to determine why — when high-ticket 
items like cameras, hi-fi units and the 
like, were showing exceptional sales — 
a siinilar demand for sterling silver 
was not evident. Reported Dichter: 
negative attitudes, wrong impressions. 

The manufacturers went agency- 
screening with their problem, finally 
gave the account to Fuller & Smith 
& Ross. The campaign that resulted 
was a joint effort by Lewis G. (Pete) 
VanAkin and Gerald T. Arthur, both 
v.p.'s, the former as account supervi- 
sor, the latter for media. 

First came the theme: "Sterling Is 
For Now." "Usually," Arthur notes, 
"the creative message dictates media. 
This was the reverse." Since the group 
was supported by individual manufac- 
turers, each of whom had an ad pro- 
gram, the agency checked all of these. 
It found almost all of this effort to be 
in magazines, with a combined ex- 
penditure totalling millions. 

"Since our first year budget was 
about $500,000," says VanAkin, "we 
realized that if we too used magazines 
we would simply be adding a little bit 
to a lot. We wanted these new dollars 
not to substitute, but to amplify." 

An analysis of sterling silver sales, 
which showed about 30 important 
markets, and a study of other media, 
balancing attributes against cost, 
|)ointed up one medium over the 



others: radio. An unusual choice for 
quality image building, perhaps, but 
as Arthur points out, the creative cam- 
paign dictated the medium. 

The campaign strategy was evolved 
in a two-part basis: a "tactical" ap- 
proach, employing participation on 
local radio shows, plus a "strategic" 
approach to provide blanket coverage 
to back up the local effort with a pro- 
motional and merchandising arm. 

Both phases began last January. The 
local phase was spread over the 30 
markets deeiried to be the inost impor- 
tant. D.J. shows were the vehicles. 

The other, over-all phase, went into 
Monitor, NBC's weekend radio service. 
From six to eight times every weekend, 
a five-minute program would be inter- 
jected. This contained soine patter 
by the "communicators," a popular 
record, and 1% minutes of commercial 
time. The group persuaded NBC to 
break away after each of these, per- 
mitting a local retailer to tie in. 
Thousands of these local tie-in spots 
were sold, an admirable compliment 
to the campaign since no co-op money 
was involved. 

The Monitor schedule was used for 
two 13-week cycles. This summer, 
when silver sales are traditionally low- 
est, the cainpaign switched to 10-second 
plugs, on the hour and half-hour on 
both Saturday and Sunday afternoons. 

Both the manufacturers and the 
agency are happy with the results of 
the first three quarters, during which 
soine 700 million impressions have 
been created at a cost of 35 cents a 
thousand. Best indication of their 
satisfaction is the schedule for this 
coming Fall when the campaign will 
include not only the local shows and 
Monitor, but add a spot schedule on 
CBS radio as well. ^ 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



On 1 January 1959, the pitchman in white will 

disappear from the tv screen. Here is a 
SPOISSOR spoof er showing what could happen to . . . 



The last onh< 



SCENE: It is a moment before mid- 
night, 31 Dec., 1958. The noise of the 
Neiv Year's Eve revelers in the streets, 
however, fails to reach up into tvhat is 
probably the only occupied office on 
Madison Avenue. This cell, within the 
Lift & Letdown Advertising Agency, 
resembles the laboratory of a "mad 
scientist" more than it does that of an 
agency tv film commercial producer. 
Mysterious liquids bubble in retorts. 
Test tubes bristle in their racks. Medi- 
cal charts on the wall trace the floiv of 
bile and lymph. Two men face each 
other glumly across the desk: Regimen 
Fleececap, L&L's commercial produc- 
er, and Plankton S. Wary, director of 
marketing and secret ingredients for 
Amorphous Labs, Inc. At last a sound 
from outside gets through — church 
bells heralding a New Year and also the 
deadline for the NAB Code ban on 
doctor-dentist dramatizations in air 
media commercials. Regimen slowly 
raises a beaker of Hydrodexticalso- 
phine #1 in a toast. 
regimen: [Sadly] To the end of an 
era. 

plankton: [Returning the toast with 
a flask of Preparation K, known to lay- 
men as Bonded Bourbon) To our new 
tv commercials, whatever they'll be. 
regimen: Thing that frosts me about 
this NAB business is that we may 
never know how that race through the 
digestive tract between the little A's 
and the little B's came out. 
plankton: Or when the golf ball 
traveling 60 miles an hour finally 
smashes through that "Invisible 
Shield—" 

regimen: [Sipping thoughtfully at his 
Hydrodexticalsophine #7) Look here, 
Plankton, aren't we taking a rather 
selfish outlook? All we're actually 
faced with is thinking up new tv com- 
mercials. We've still got our jobs. 
We're much better off than — 
PLANKTON: You're right. Think what 
a bleak New Year faces poor old Doc — 
At this moment, the door opens to ad- 
mit a graying, balding, fiftyish fellow 
wearing a rumpled white coat and 
trailing a stethoscope. Behind horn 
rim glasses, his eyelids are reddened. 



his cheeks stained with tears. Were it 
not for his slouch of despond and 
dragging gait, he might be described 
as distinguished-looking what with his 
whitened temples and high forehead 
upon which perches a medical reflec- 
tor. Veteran of a score of pseudo- 
medic tv commercials for Amorphous 
Labs, he is affectionately known along 
Ad Row as "Doc." For years, millions 
of tv viewers have accepted him as the 
last word in the field of medical-den- 
tistry discovery. Only his actor's agent 
and a few admen know that he is 
really Lester Varney, a former brick- 
layer who helped build Levittown. He 
peels off his white jacket, throws it on 
the floor and collapses into a chair. 
Regimen rushes to his side, pats his 
shoulder solicitously. 
REGIMEN: There, there, Doc, don't take 
it too hard. 

doc: [Brokenly) The jig is up! De- 
frocked at the height of my career! 
PLANKTON: Chin up, Doc. Try to look 
at this not as the end of your great 
medical career — but simply that the 
show has folded. 

DOC: [With bitterness) I'll say it's 
folded! Today I took the caduceus 
emblem off my Porsche. I'll have to 
park legally from now on. [Holds out 
the stethoscope to Plankton). Here, I 
guess you'll be wanting this back now? 
PLANKTON: [Generously) No, you keep 
it. Doc. And the white coat. You may 
get another part in some non-commer- 
cial bit. They're always casting doc- 
tor types. 

regimen: [Brightly) Sure, some tv 
drama. The movies. Broadway. Off- 
Broadway. 

plankton: And there's always sum- 
mer stock. 

doc: How can you talk of summer 
stock when it's only January? Besides 
I don't want to be an actor. I want to 
be a — 

regimen: You could take up brick- 
laying again. 

doc: And ruin these fine surgeon's 
hands! I tell you now I've had a taste 
of being a doctor, that's what I want 
to be! I want to prescribe. I want to 
advise — 



REGIMEN: But we can't keep you on. 
Doc. Everyone'd crack down — FTC, 
NAB, AMA— 

doc: — I want to unveil new scientific 
discoveries. I want to fight tired blood, 
stamp out the "gray sickness." I want 
people to brush their teeth — not only 
after every meal but after every 
snack — 

plankton: Very commendable, Doc. 
But we must face reality. 
DOC: (Ignoring all interruptions) — I 
want to be there when headache 
strikes. 1 want people to get better 
faster — six times faster, seven times 
faster — [Begins racing around the of- 
fice, scattering test tubes and Bunsen 
burners) — Faster, faster — 
[Regimen and Plankton jump on him, 
pin him to the floor) . 
REGIMEN: Easy, Doc. 
plankton : I think he's suffering from 
jangled nerves. Well, Amorphous Labs 
has just the thing for that. [Rum- 
mages through the glasstvare, finds a 
phial of capsules, and feeds two of 
them to Doc). Aha, Phyradehalsti- 
mine Plus. 

REGIMEN: Makes you feel a little silly 
feeding pills to the Doc, doesn't it? 
plankton: It might, if he was a real 
doc. But since we know he's a phoney 
sawbones — - 

doc: [Struggling in Regimens grasp) 
I heard that! Well, listen, you birds 
where would you be if it wasn't for 
me? I'll tell you. Amorphous Labs 
would still be manufacturing bug spray 
exclusively — 

plankton: (Pompously) Diversifica- 
tion was bound to come. 
doc: It came because I sat on the cor- 
ner of a shiny desk, looked into the tv 
cameras and — in my best tv-side man- 
ner — said, "When Mrs. X came to me 
she was nervous, rundown, irritable. 
I told her she needed the soft, super- 
cleansing, mineral-building muscle- 
tightening action of Amorphous Liver 
Lifters and today, less than three weeks 
later, Mrs. X is president of her gar- 
den club. Yes, friends, you too can 
have your liver livened — " 
regimen: Plankton didn't mean to 
hack away at your professional stature. 



sponsor • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



>lthe white coats 



doc: Oh, no? Then how come you 
started flashing "A Dramatization" on 
the picture every time I came on? 
plankton: We were forced into that. 
The tv viewers had to be warned they 
weren't listening to a real physician. 
regimen: You were that convincing, 
Doc. 

DOC: Naturally I was convincing. I 
wasn't playing a part — I was living it ! 
Wasn't I the first to put a stop-watch 
on a drop of Formula P as it traveled 
through the blood stream to the Hic- 
cough Control Center? Whose picture 
went into the merchandising of Amor- 
phous Bile Builders? 
PLANKTON: Please, Doc, we recognize 
your contribution to medical science 
and so do all the drug chains across 
the nation. When Regimen and I 
dream up a new series of commercials 
we'll try to find some spot for you. 
But at this moment all of us face an 
uncertain New Year. 
regimen: That's right. The old order 
changeth — 

DOC: It's easy for you fellows to talk. 
You'll still be picking up lunches at 
Gaston's or Toots Shoor. I'll be just 
an actor "at liberty" haunting Horn 
& Hardart. {Crosses to window; a 
light snow has begun to fall) . Ah, 
well, life was also hard on Pasteur and 
Curie. (Doc throws open the window). 
plankton: {Rushing to his side) Doc, 
Doc! Don't jump! All isn't lost. 
{Doc upends Plankton, dangles him 
outside the window by his ankles). 
DOC: You bet your sweet life it isn't. 
REGIMEN: {Alarmed) Doc, don't drop 
him. He's a marketing v.p. ! 
DOC: Okay, only no more nonsense 
about summer stock or bricklaying. 
Once a doctor, always a doctor. I'm 
going to med school and Amorphous 
Labs is footing the bill. 
plankton: {Weakly, from outside) 
Anything you say. Doc. Johns Hop- 
kins all right? 

REGIMEN: But, Doc, you'll wind up the 
oldest intern in the profession! 
DOC: {Hauling Plankton- back inside) 
I've got time. What's a doctor with- 
out patience? ^ 




<^' ^^^mP^^ 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



O'Connell's ^^streamlined'' rate car«ti 



r 


^^ 


|! 




m-4 


■ ^ 


Ivf 


1 




THE O'CONNELL 




PROPOSAL 




1. 


Eliminate freqiieiicv c 
completely. 


iscounts 


O Establish a flat rate 
fc" time segments from 
hour to one minute. 


for all 
one-half 


3. 

30, 


Institute weekly announce- = 
ment packages of 5, 10, 20, § 
50 weekly-all in round figures. 1 


11 Price 20 and 30 second spots | 
^" at 75% of applicable minute ^ 
rate— 8 or 10 second spots at 50%. g 


5. 


Allow multiple product com- m 
panics to cdiiihine products to = 

1 lu-n,-r packa,. rate. | 






lllilllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllii^. 



^ Agency men applaud representative's plan to eliminate 
frequency discount, and short rate and rebate headaches 

^ Most say simplified rate card would save work, time 
and trouble ; some see need for adding long-term discounts 



l^ick O'Connell. president of Rich- 
atrl O'Connell Inc.. station representa- 
li\t'>. has come up with a proposal for 
>iiii|ilifierl radio rate cards that is gen- 
erating inuch talk and enthusiasm 
among over-worked agency media luen 
and timebuyers. 

Objective of the O'Connell plan is to 
cut down on the vast tonnage of paper 
work and backbreaking man hours 
that are required in today's spot buy- 
ing and selling operations. 

In this, O'Connell goes along with 
what many responsible reps and indus- 
try leaders have been saying for some 
time — that radio rate cards are so 
cumbersome, complex, and difficult to 
understand that they hamper efficiency 
and act as a drag on selling. (See com- 



ments in "Industry Reactions" below.) 
What distinguishes the O'Conrell 
proposal from other and previous, ef- 
forts at rate card simplification are 
these three points: 

1 1 O'Connell recommends the com- 
plete elimination of all frequency dis- 
counts, short rates and rebates. 

2) The O'Connell plan has been 
thoroughly field-tested — on the Lobster 
Network, and KVLC, Little Rock. 

3) A post card questionnaire to 
500 agency timebuyers drew 200 re- 
plies, with 85 '^r favoring the plan. 

In attacking the problem of rate 
card simplification savs O'Connell, the 
first job was to pinpoint the objective 
— "to find out just where the present 
archaic and cumbersome system pro- 



INDUSTRY— REACTIONS EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS TO R. O'CONNELL 



SRDS 

"We in advertising have inherited in 
rate structures much that is confusing 
and not essential. I applaud your ef- 
forts at simplification, and hope that 
out of the combined efforts of the 
NAB, the 4As, our own SRDS and 
such people as you, a more nearly uni- 
form approach will be developed." — 
C. Laury Botthot, Fres. 

CHARLES BERNARD CO. 

"Congratulations on your pioneering 
effort to take the "short rate and su- 
perfluous data" out of SRDS. I agree 
with you completely that the rate struc- 
ture of some stations is so complex that 
no busy timebuyer will take the time to 
unscramble it. We have been after our 
own stations to streamline their rate 
pattern . . . and as you know I've al- 
ways been opposed to short rating." — 
Chuck Bernard. 



AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 

". . . Obviously the more the buying 
process is simplified, the happier the 
timebuyer becomes and the quicker he 
or she can handle national spot radio 
buying assignments. Further simplifi- 
cation of rate cards . . . should help 
our selling and increase volume for 
this low cost, high-efficiency medium. 
I'm for it. " — John J. Tormey. 

ADAM YOUNG, INC. 

"Since radio advertisers today recog- 
nize the desirability of saturation 
schedules, we feel it important to base 
the rate card on weekly schedules as 
you suggest. . . . Since there is still a 
tendency by some advertisers to re- 
quest "traffic" periods almost exclu- 
sively, we have incorporated a "^3 in 
traffic time" feature into our rate 
cards, and are also experimenting with 
a method of using the rate card to 



ease advertisers into hitherto over- 
looked nighttime periods, without cut- 
rate methods. — Frank G. Boehm. 

H-R REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 

"I think your idea of simplifying rate 
structures is an excellent one. But it 
will take unanimity to make it effec- 
tive, and station operators are tradi- 
tionally independent in their ways. . . . 
Simplified rate cards might well be the 
greatest boost to spot selling since the 
saturation buy." — Faul R. Weeks. 

SRA 

"There's nothing quite so frustrating 
as trying to figure out some of the 
complicated rate cards still being used 
by stations. Stations and representa- 
tive firms must constantly work to- 
ward making spot radio and tv easier 
to buy and sell. The simplified rate 
card is a tremendous step in the right 
direction." — Lawrence Webb. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



riitirs timebuyer enthusiasm 



vided a basic obstacle to efficiency." 

"As we suspected the old frequency 
discount proved to be the real cul- 
prit, together with its nefarious cous- 
ins short rate and rebate. All three 
are a hangover from newspaper days, 
vi'hen many radio stations were owned 
by newspapers, and adopted their rate 
structures from them. 

"In the old leisurely '30s, frequency 
discounts weren't too troublesome. 
But today, with more than 3000 radio 
stations and several hundred tv sta- 
tions, they're causing buyers and sell- 
ers to chew up miles of adding ma- 
chine tape, and sending timebuyers. 
estimators, and billing department 
heads to neighboring ulcer hospitals. 

"Our analysis showed that, under 
today's conditions, frequency discounts 
are unnecessary and unrealistic. They 
are just a state of mind. We recom- 
mend eliminating them completely. 

"In their place we suggest setting 
up a flat rate for all time segments 
from a one-half hour down to one min- 
ute. (We suggest starting with the half 
hour since the last hour sold in radio 
was the Woolworth Hour on CBS.) 

"Second, we recommend setting up 
weekly announcement packages — 5- 
weekly, 10-weekly, 20-weekly, 30- 
weekly, 50-weekly — all in round fig- 
ures. 

"Third, offer 20- and 30-second 
spots at 75% of the applicable min- 
ute rate — eight or 10 second spots at 
50% of the minute package. 

"We also suggest allowing multiple- 
product advertisers to combine prod- 
ucts in order to earn a better package 
rate." 

According to O'Connell the plan has 
these advantages: 

1. By eliminating frequency dis- 
counts it eliminates all short rate 
and rebate headaches. 

2. Billing departments at stations 
and agencies will save tremen- 
dous time in computing invoices, 
and agencies will cut down on 
paper work in paying them. 

3. Most important, it will make it 
much easier for the media man 
to buy time. When he asks how- 
much 10 spots weekly will cost 
in a given market, the station 
representative can give him the 



answer pronto — without resort- 
ing to slide rules, or calculus. 

This last point, says O'Connell is 
especially important, since at present, 
most reps can give only qualified an- 
swers about many rate card questions. 
Suppose you're asked, queries O'Con- 
nell, "how much will it cost Lucky 
Strike in September, because of what 
Pall Mall did in April, thereby giving 
Herbert Tareyton the 9,436 time rate 
in November, if they run a Class A 
package combined with a Class D pro- 
vided 12 of these spots are run on 
Sunday afternoon when its raining — 
what answer do you give?" 

O'Connell admits that the above ex- 
ample is a facetious one but says it 
illustrates the kind of difficulties pro- 
vided by the confusions and complexi- 
ties of many "modern" rate cards. 

Before recommending the stream- 
lined rate card to its entire station 
list, Richard O'Connell Inc. tested it 
out on a regional operation (the Lob- 
ster Network in Maine) and on a local 
station in a highly competitive market 
— KVLC, Little Rock, Ark. 

Results, say O'Connell were com- 
pletely satisfactory in both areas. Out 
of 30 contracts of varying lengths sold 
in Little Rock, 29 were on the weekly 
package system, and only one buyer 
preferred the old frequency system. 

Based on this experience, O'Connell 
asked its stations to adopt the weekly 
package structure, and says that "hap- 
pily for them and for the agencies" 
most are now using it. 

Perhaps even more significant, 
O'Connell surveyed 500 timebuyers 
and media directors with a post card 
questionnaire, sent out with a small 
brochure "Easy to Buy — Hence, Easy 
to Sell" that explained the package 
plan and reasons for it. 

More than 200 media men took time 
to answer, and their replies were al- 
most unanimously enthusiastic (See 
box). Approximately 15% felt that 
some sort of 13-26-52-week frequency 
discount should be added to the plan 
"in fairness to long term advertisers." 
But nearly everyone praised the O'Con- 
nell recommendations as a positive, 
constructive step toward freeing spot 
operations from the shackles of costly, 
time consuming paper work. ^ 



COMMENTS FROM 
TIMEBUYERS 

1. All for it 

AMEN!!! A uniform rate structure with 
easily computed costs would facilitate 
work by at least 50%. 

Jules Fine, 

Ogilvy, Benson & Mather 
I'm 100% in favor of it. When do we 
Val Ritter, Cunningham & Walsh 
I completely agree. Most spot buys are 
made on multiple frequency over a short 
period of time. 

Ed Richardson, Geyer 
Fm with you! 

Millie Fulton, McCann-Erickson 
I couldn't agree more! 

Gail Myers, Cumbinner 
I'm with you all the way. Am I correct 
in assuming anything under five spots 
would take multiple rate? 

Joan Rutman, Grey 
Basically, your idea is good. Some uni- 
form system is definitely needed. 

Robert F. Bruno, D-F-S 
Excellent idea. Count me as an ardent 
supporter of your proposal. 

Thomas J. Ellis, Grant 
Sounds wonderful for everyone except 
SRDS (Ed. note: see SRDS comment in 
box on previous page.) 

Joe O'Brien, Y&R 
I think the system will make buying 
simpler and cut down on the mathemati- 
cal calculations involved in timebuying. 
Stu Eckert, DCS&S 
Excellent idea. Simplification of most of 
our work is a step in the right direction. 
Kathryn Shanahan, 
Morey, Humm & Warwick 



Agreed ! 
Very sou 



Jim Kelly, F. D. Richards 

' idea. Hope it goes through. 
Anne Burkholder, 
Anderson and Cairns 
In complete agreement. This would be 
GREAT! 

Pat Hartnett, J. M. Mathes 

2. Yes but some reservations 

As a flexible medium, radio should have 
features in its rate structure which ac- 
commodate all advertisers. You should, 
therefore, include a consecutive week dis- 
count as an incentive for the long term 
advertiser. 

R. C. Pickett, FC&B 
Simplicity — yes. Standardization — not nec- 
essary. No frequency discount — you ne- 
gate Adam Smith. Never. 

R. A. Boulware, Bryan Houston 

We're for easier-to-read rate cards, but B 

against penalization of 52-week advertis- g 

ers. Your proposal would make life g 

easier for all of us, but would penalize M 

the 52-week account that might have only g 

two, three, or four announcements weekly. g 

L. Butner, g 

Albert Frank-Guenther Law g 

Would make our job much easier, how- =. 

ever feel a 13, 26 & 52 frequency dis- g 

count should be included. g 

Doug Humm, Charles W. Hoyt S 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Dixie Cup's unusual Air strategy 



^ To get real impact with a small budget, Dixie Cup 
bought a concentrated 30-day network television schedule 

^ The buy, along with unusual commercials, brought 
Dixie Cup favorable trade reaction — and bigger sales 



I here is a good deal to be said for 
steady, consistent advertising. On the 
other hand, a good case can be made 
for a short, but concentrated, burst. 

Typical of the latter school is a cam- 
paign waged this spring by Dixie Cup, 
Easton, Pa., a division of American 
Can Co. Dixie is a manufacturer of 
paper cups and containers, designed 
for use both in the home and com- 
mercial and industrial applications. 

This past spring Dixie waged a 
"one-shot" campaign that ran for a 
month, on behalf of its home products 
division, that portion of its line for 
home use. Titled the "Month of Stars," 



it consisted of a heavy schedule run- 
ning almost the length and breadth of 
the NBC TV network schedule. 

In what has been termed a "short 
term mass marketing approach," Dixie 
went on beginning 17 April for 30 
days. During that period its spots ap- 
peared on 13 different NBC TV net- 
v/ork shows. The total commercial 
time during the month was 36 min 
utes; the estimated number of impres- 
sions, 180 million. 

Reaction was commensurate with 
the intensity of the campaign. Dixie's 
salesmen were happy; said one "it was 
a great feeling to call on a buyer for a 



food chain and rattle off a dozen net- 
work name shows." 

The effect on the buyers was equally 
gratifying. The key to success for any 
manufacturer selling through super- 
markets is display space, and Dixie 
was able to note significant improve- 
ments as chains and independents tied- 
in with the promotion. Even from 
paper wholesalers, a group not notably 
voluble, came favorable reaction. They 
told the company that it came off in 
the trade as being highly imaginative 
and very much aware of the need for 
creative merchandising. 

The campaign was short and sweet. 
The whole thing began about the first 
of the year when the company went 
looking for a spring promotion to push 
its cups and cup dispenser for home 
use. 

The first barrier — budget — was 

hurdled with a suggestion from Dixie's 

[Please turn to page 78) 



vith net tv programs used. Shown with Jan Murray (r) of Treasii 




SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



TV BASICS/SEPT 



/' 



An early look at fall network tv 



^ New program line-up is beginning to take shape with 
32 shows replaced by 14 newcomers, 17 from last season 

^ New look includes : Donna Reed, Ed Wynn, Peter Gunn, 
Steve Canyon, Walt Disney Presents, Northwest Passage 



etwork tv is beginning to look like 



N 

fall. 

Thirty-two of the summer shows 
will be dropped during the four weeks 
of this Comparagraph (30 Aug.-26 
Sept.), replaced by 14 newcomers and 
17 carryovers from last season. 

Here's a rundown, by network, of 
the latest developments: 

ABC: To revamp parts of its night- 
time schedule, Lawrence Welk's Mon- 
day hour will be shifted to Wednesday 
night, and Disneyland, now dubbed 



Walt Disney Presents, to Friday night. 
John Daly will be in prime time with 
his News: weeknights, 10:30-10:45 
p.m., for Whitehall and Lorillard. 
Ozzie & Harriet airs a half hour 
earlier, replacing Tombstone Territory; 
the Donna Reed Show for Campbell 
Soup and Shulton follows. Patti Page, 
for Oldsmobile, completes this Wednes- 
day night line-up. 

CBS: Little change here, since most 
of the fall shows will bow in October. 
Jack Benny returns 21 September; 



Father Knows Best debuts on this net- 
work 22 Sept., and The Lineup, for 
P&G and Brown & Williamson replaces 
Undercurrent 26 September. 

NBC: The schedule here looks set. 
Steve Allen, Perry Como, Gobel and 
Fisher are back. Many of last seasons' 
shows have changed time slots: 
Twenty-One moves to Thursday night, 
with Peter Gunn, for Bristol-Myers 
taking over its Monday night period; 
The Ed Wynn Show, for L&M and 
Bulova, pushes You Bet Your Life 
from 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., Thurs- 
day replacing The Price Is Right. The 
latter will be seen Wednesday nights 
instead, when Father Knows Best bows 
out. Other new shows include: Behind 
Closed Doors (L&M, Whitehall); 
Further Adventures of Ellery Queen 
(sust.) ; Steve Canyon (L&M) and 
Brains and Brawn (Chesterfield). ^ 



1. THIS MONTH IN TELEVISION 

Network Sales Status Week Ending 30 August 

Daytime Nighttime 



SPONSORED HOURS 



Live 

31.1 ABCm 

93.2 CBSti 
95.2 NBCi 



% 
Live 
31.0 ABCfi 
51 CBSti 
49.5 NBC ■ 



SPONSORED HOURS 



122.9 



t Eicludlng participation shorn. 



Tv Dimensions Today 

Tv homes index 





1958 


1957 


U. S. homes 


50.8 


50.0 


Tv homes 


43.0 


40.3 



Tv retail set sales index 



7 months 7 months 

July 1958 July 1957 1958 1957 

279,010 426,334 2,456,662 3,236,737 



s figures in millions. 



Source: ESectronlc Industries Assn. (formerly RETMA) 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



2. ALPHABETICAL PROGRAM INDEX 

Sponsored Nighttime Networic Programs 6-11 p.m. 



PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


Air Power: D-F 


45.000 




father Knows Best: Sc-F 


38,000 


Scott Paper, jWT; Lever Bros, )WT 


Alcoa-Goodyear Theater: 


39,500 


Alcoa, FSR; alt Goodyear, Y&R 


■Eddie Fisher: \ -L 


98,000 


L&M, Mc-E (9,30 S) 


Dr-F 


















Frontier Justice 


13,500 


Gen Foods. B&B 


•Steve Allen Show: V-L 


108.000 


Greyhound. Grey; DuPont, BBDO; 
Polaroid, DDB; U. S. Time, Peck 


G.E. Theatre: Dr-F 


51,000 


Gen Elect, BBDO 


Anybody Can Play 


21.000 


R. ]. Reynolds, Esty 














* George Gobel 


98,000 


RCA & Whirlpool, K&E (9/23 S) 


Armatrong Circle Theatre: 


48.000 


Armstrong Cork, BBDO 








Dr-L 


(altwks) 




Godfrey's Scouts: \ -L 


32,000 


TonI, North 


Bachelor Father: Sc-F 
Alt Jack Benny 


42.000 
65.000 


Amer Tobacco, Gumbinner 
Amer Tobacco. BBDO 


Peter Gunn: M-F 


38,000 


Bristol-Myers, DCS&S (9 22 SI 








Gunsmoke: W-F 


40,000 


L&M, DFS; Sperry Rand (1 wk In 4). 


Behind Closed Doors: A-F 


38.000 


L&M. Mc-E; Whitehall, Bates (9 2 S) 






Y&R 


Bid V Hiiy: Q-L 


36,000 


Revlon, BBDO 


Have Gun, Will Travel: W-F 


38,000 


Whitehall, Bates; alt Lever. )WT 


Bold Journey: A-F 


9,500 


Ralston Purina, CBB 


Hitchcock Presents: My-F 


39,000 


Bristol-Myers, Y&R 


Brains and Brawn: QL 


45,000 


Chesterfield Mc-E (9 13 S) 


Robin Hood: A-F 


29,000 


'"te " '"•""""• '''"■■ ^'""'••'•' 


Broken Arrow: W-F 


31.000 


Miles, Wade; Ralston Purina, Gardner 


I Love Lucy: Sc-F 


25,000 


Gen Foods, B&B 


Buckskin: W-F 


33.000 


Ford, |WT 


Investigator 


35,000 


L&M. Mc-E; RCA & Whirlpool. K&E 

(L 9/16) 


Bums & Allen: Sc-F 


40,000 


Carnation. EW.R&R; Gen Mills, BBDO 














I've Got a Secret: Q-L 


27,000 


R. |. Reynolds, Esty 




37.500 


Singer Sewing. Y&R; Lipton, Y&R 














Johnson's Wax Theatre 


1 1 .000 


S. C. lohnson, NL&B 


Steve Canyon : A-F 


44,000 


L&M. Mc-E (9/13 S) 














*Kraft Mystery Theatre: Dr-L 


53,000 


Kraft. ;WT 


Cavalcade of Sports: Sp-L 


45.000 


Gillette. Maxon 


Lassie: A-F 


37,000 


Campbell Soup, BBDO 


» Chevy Show: V-L 


150,000 


Chevrolet. Camp-Ewald 












Leave It To Beaver: Sc-F 


36.000 


Remington Rand, Compton; alt Vi 


Chevy Showroom 


9.500 


Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 






open 








•Life of Riley: Sc-F 


30.500 


Lever Bros, BBDO; alt wk open (L 


Cheyenne: W-F 


78.000 


Gen Elect. Y&R, BBDO & Grey; Na- 
tional Carbon 




9/19) 








M Squad: My-F 


28,000 


Amer Tobacco, SSC&B; alt Bulova. 


Circus Boy : A-F 


34.000 


Mars. Knox Reeves; alt Kellogg, Bur- 




Mc-E 






nett 


Perry Mason: My-F 


26,500 
(20min.) 


Libby-Owens-Ford, F&S&R; Armour, 
FC&B 1/2 hr open 


Dick Clark: V-L 


14,500 


Beech-Nut Litesavers. Y&R 














Maverick: W-F 


35.000 




Colgate Theater: DF 


15,000 


Colgate, Bates 




(Vi hr.) 




IVrry Como: V-L 


120,000 


Kimberly-Clark. FCB; Noxzema. SS 
C&B; RCA & Whirlpool, K&E; Sun- 


Meet the Press: I-L 


7.500 


Pan American Airways, )WT 






beam. Perrin-Paus; Amer Dairy. 
Campbell-Mithun; Knomark, Mogul 


Millionaire: Dr-F 


37,000 


Colgate, Bates 


Bob Cummings Show: Sc-F 


36,000 


R. |, Reynolds, Esty; alt Chesebrough- 
Ponds. Mc-E 


Mr. Adams & Eve: Sc-F 


41,000 


R. J. Reynolds, Esty 








Music from Manhattan: M-L 


17,000 


Manhattan Shirts. Peck (9 20 SI 


Inhn Daly- News 


6,000 


Whitehall, Bates; Lorillard, LN 














Name that Tune: Q-L 


23,000 


Kellogg, Burnett; Whitehall. Bates 


Decisioii 


1 1 ,000 


P&G, B&B 














Navy Log: Dr-F 


38,500 


U. S. Rubber; F. D. Richards 


Destiny: Dr-F 


1 1 ,000 


General Foods. B&B; Ford, )WT (L 










9 261 


Original Amateur Hour: V-L 


23,000 


Pharmaceuticals, Parkson 


Richard Diamond: A-F 


35.000 


Lorillard. L&N 














Ozzie& Harriet: Sc-F 


48.000 


Kodak. JWT; Quaker Oats 


Walt Disney Presents: M-F 


57.000 


Hill Bros., Ayer; Kellogg, Burnett; 










('/2 hr.) 


Reynolds Metals, Buchanan: Frank 


Patti Page: V-L 


40,000 


Oldsmobile, Brother 


Dragnet: My-F 


35.000 


L&M, DFS; Schick, B&B 


Pantomime Quiz: Q-L 


2,000 


Associated Products, Grey 


Wyatt Earp: W-F 


38,000 


Gen Mills, DFS; P&G, Compton 


People Are Funny: M-F 


24,000 


R. |. Reynolds, Esty; Toni, North 


Doug Edwards News: N-L&F 


9.500tt 


Whitehall, Bates; American Can. 
Compton 


Personal Appearance 


10,000 


Florists Delivery Assn., Grant; alt 



•Color thow. (h) Live. (F) Film, ttCost is i 
mutaininc. pBrtiripatinK or co-op prorramB — Be 
eoata uieladinc ulent and production. They a 



?.0 AuKust-26 .s,.ptfiiil,(T. Program tvpps .ire indicated as follows: (A) Adventu,., 
(Au) Audience Participation, (0) Comedy. (D) Documentary, (Dr) Drama. (I) 
Interview, (J) Juvenile, (M) MiBC. (Mu) Music. (My) Mystery. (N) News. (Q) 
Quiz. (S) Serial. (Sc) Situation Comedy. (Sp) Sports. (V) Variety. (W) Weetem. 

Listing continues on page 46 ^ 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Interview: 




Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell &. Bayles, Inc. Timebuyer, Jack Canning, 
tells why he selects WLW TV-Radio Stations for PALL MALL Cigarettes. 



"Sure, I buy time 
for PALL MALL Famous 
Cigarettes on the Crosley 
Stations because their 
greater length of 
audience filters 
ommercials farther 
iito smooth pleasure 
or advertisers." 



"Yes, WLW Television and Radio 

Stations really pack in a full house of 

viewers across the Midwest and into the 

South for sponsor's sure-fire sales success." 




"Outstanding— and that's 
putting it mildly!" 




Network Affiliations: NBC; ABC; MBS • Sales Offices: New York, Cincinnati, Chicago, Cleveland • Sales Representatives: NBC Spot Sales: Detroit, 
Los Angeles, San Francisco. Bomar Lowrance & Associates, Inc., Atlanta, Dallas Crosley Broadcasting Corporation, a division of .^KCO 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 





(£3. 


NIGHTTIME 


i 


: c 


> IN 


n r 


» / 


^ 1 


|l 




SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


ABC 




6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 
7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 
8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 
9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 
10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 


JNE 

t 




The Search 

IU>t 


Meet The Press 
















ru 




Air Power 
Prudentltl 


Outlook 




D Edwards 


News 

iUlt 




No net service 








D Edwards 

Wliltehall 


News 
sust alt Carter 


r 


rou Asked for It 


Noah's Ark 

suit 
Mark Saber 

(9/21 S) 


Sports Focus 


No net service 
D Edwards 
(repeat feed) 




Sports Focus 

Bust (L9/12) 


No net service 


News 

(repeat feed) 


Sports F«ei 

sust (L9/H 




Sklppy P»»nut 
Batur 


Campbell Soup 


News 


News 

(repeat feed) 


News 


D Edwards 

Whitehall 


News la 


K>li*r OtoapinlM 
(7:S0-i:S0) 


Bachelor Father 
The Brothers 

ack Bcnny(sV21S) 


No Warning 
Bwal 'IVpe<iTlt«- 

■Jorthwest Passage 

(y/i4S) 


Cowtown Rodeo 

iU9t 


Robin Hood 
Johnson & Jh.n 


Haggis^Baggis 


Cheyenne 

Oen Electric 

Nafl Carbon (9/23) 

(alt wks 

7:80-8-30) 


Name That Tune 

Whitehall alt 
Kellogg 


Win With A 

Winner sust 

Dragnet 

Bulova 


The Plymott 
Show 
Starring 


r 


Maverick 


Ed Sullivan 

Merairy 
alt Kodak 


Steve Allen 

(8-9; 9/7 S) 
Greyhound 


Cowtown Rodeo 


Burns & Allen 

Carnation alt 
Oen tolla 


Restless Cun 
War. -Lambert 

P&G 


(altwk. 7:30-8:30) 
Am Chicle. 

Ludm's (9/16 S) 


Mr. Adams & Eve 


The Investigator 
KCA 

Whirlpool 
L4M 


Lawrence Wi 

Plymouth 

(7:30-8:30; 9/1 


: 


Anybody Can 


Ed Sullivan 


Polaroid 
U.S. Time 


Bold Journey 
RalitoD-Punna 


Masquerade Party 

Tttnl 
Father Knows Best 

Lever alt Scott 
(9/22 S) 


Wells Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 
alt Bulck 


Wyatt Earp 

Gen Mills 
alt P&G 


Keep Talking 

sust 


George Cobel 

RCA alt Wlilrlpool 
(8-9; 9/23 S) 


Tombstone T 

Ozzie Han 
Kodak, Quak 
Oats (9/24 8 


III 


Traffic Court 


C. E. Theatre 
OonBlwtrlt 


Chivy Show 
(9-10) 
Chwrolet 


Stars of Jazz 

Voice of Firestone 

Firestone 
(9/8 S) 


1 Love Lucy 
GenFioodi 


Twenty-One 

Peter Cunn 

(9/22 S) 
Bristol-Myers 


Broken Arrow 

EaU-Punna 
alt HUet 


Truth 
Pharmaeeutleals 

Marlboro 


Colgate Theatre 
Colgate 


Kodak 

Donna Reed St 

Campbell Sol 

Shulton (9/24 


Open Hearing 


Hitchcock 
Theatre 

Brl.tol-Myeri 


Chevy Show 


Polka Co Round 

(9:30-10:30) 


Frontier Justice 
OmFtada 


Alcoa-Coodyear 
Theater 
Aleo* alt 
Geodyetr 


Pantomime 
Quiz 

Assoc. ProducU 


Spotlight Plyhse 
alt S. C. Johnson 


Bob Cummings 

ReTooldj 
alt Chese-Ponds 


General MUl 

Patti Page Sh 

Oldsmobll* 

(9/24 S) 


rhe Mike Wallace 
Interview 


SUA 

ReTlon alt 
P. Lorlllard 


Decision 
P&O 


Polka Co Round 


Studio One 
In Hollywood 

(10-11) 


Suspicion 

(10-11) 
BterllnE Drug 

Various H hr. 


Harness Racing 


Bid 'n' Buy 


The Californians 

Singer alt 

Llpton 


Wed NigM 

Fighti 

Mennan. lOh 

(l»-«ond) 


No net tervic* 


What's My Line 

Kelloff 

alt H Curtli 


No net service 


John Daly News 

Whitehall 

(9/lf S) 


DuPont Show of 
The Month 

DuPonl 
(9:30-11; 9/22) 


suspicion 

Various M hr. 


John Daly News 


No net service 


No net service 




I 


No net service 


No net service 


I 




NOTE: L prec«!lnf 










m at turn iponaor I 


n time slot. 








f 















Index continued . Sponsored Nighttime Network Programs 


6-11 p.m. 


PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AQENCIEfi' 


Playhouse 90: Dr-L&F 


45,000 
'A hr. 


Amer Gas, L&N; Bristol-Myers. BBDO; 

Burnett: Pillsbury. Burnett; R. J. 
Reynolds. Esty 


Spotlight Playhouse 
Gale Storm Show: Sc-F 


9.500 
39,500 


Pet Milk, Gardner; alt S. C. Johnse 

NL&B 
Nestle. B. Houston; Helene Curti 

E. H. Weiss 


Plymouth Show (Lawrence 
Welk) 


24.000 


Plymouth, Grant 


Studio One In Hollywood: 
Dr-L 


55,000 


Westinghouse, Mc-E 


Post Fight Beat 


3.000 


Bristol-Myers, DCS&S 


Sugarfoot: W-F 


40,000 
(V4 hr.) 


Amer Chicle, Bates; Luden's, Mathi 


The Real McCoy.: Sc-F 


36,000 


Sylvania, JWT 


Ed Sullivan Show: V-L 


79.500 


Mercury. K&E; alt Kodak, JWT 


Donna Reed Show: Sc-F 


53.000* 


Campbell Soup; Shulton 


Sunday News Special: N-L 


9.500 


Whitehall. Bates; alt Carter Prw 


ReaUcM Gun: W-F 
Rin Tin Tin: A-F 
Schlitz Playhouse: Dr-F 


37.500 
36.000 
38.000 


Warner-Lambert, SSC&B, alt P6C, 

Compton 
Nabisco. K&E 

Schlitz. JWT 


Suspicion: My-L&F 
Tales of Wells Fargo: W-F 


79,500 
43,800 


Sterling Drug, DFS; P&C, Cray; Var 
ous, 1-hr 

Amer Tobacco. SSC&B; alt Bute! 
Mc-E 


Phil Silvers Show: Sc-F 


42.000 


P&C. Burnett; R. J. Reynolds. Esty 


The Price is Right: Q-L 


28,000 


Lever, JWT; Speidel, SSC&B 


Sgt. Preston: AF 


32.000 


Quaker Oats, WBT 


The Texan: W-F 


37.000 


Brown & Wmson, Bates; alt open 


164,000 Challenge: QL 


35,000 


P. Lorillard, Y&R 


The Thin Man: My-F 


40.000 


Colgate-Palmolive, Bates 


46 




SPONSOR • ( 


3 SEPTEMBER 1958 



G R A P 



30iAUG. - 26 SEPT. 



>NESDAY 

BS NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



News 

repeat feed) 



Wagon Train 

(7:30-8:30) 

Edsel. 



Circus Boy 

Marsilt 
Eellotc 



Tic Tac Dough 
RCA 

Wam-Lambert 



Rin Tin Tin Eoing Boing Show 



Y^ou Bet Your Life 
Richard Diamond DeSoto, Tonl 
'''«*^ Sn^^V'"' Ed Wynn Show 

(9/25 S) 



Perry Mason ^"''(g^i"'"' 

^H jKlmberI«7-OUrk. 



Amw IHliy 

Enoisark 
Perry Como 



he Real McCoys 



The Verdict Is 

(9/25 S) 



Twenty-One 

Pharmaceuticals 
(9/25 S) 



Nafl Dairy, 
mil Bros., Breck 
1:30; 9/12) 



Kraft Mystery 
Theatre 
(«-10) 



The Verdict Is 



(Siese-Ponda 
Stars of Jazz 

(9/12 S) 



Phil Silvers 

P*0 alt 

R. J. Reynoldi 

Schick 



Amer. Tobae. 



Lawrence Welk 

(9-10' 



Briitol My«n 



Buick Action 
Theater 

Buick 



Lawrenci; Welk 



Have Cun, Will 
Travel 

WhltrtuUl 



Turning Point 

Schick alt 

SooU 



t Could Be You 



Price Is Right 
Vou Bet Your Life 



Bromi & Wmson 



Music From 
Manhattan 

Hanhattan Shirt 
(0/30 8 ) 



Circle 
re 
ti M-Il) 



'<o Net Service 



|ohn Daly News 



B. J. Reynolds 



Music Bingo 

5 Day Deodorant 
,000 Challenge 



Joseph Cotton 

mer Tobacco, TonJ 
rains & Brawn 

(9/13 S) 



PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


This Is Your Life: D-L 
*Tic Tac Dough: Q-L 

To TeU The Truth: Q-L 
Trackdown: A-F 

Twenty-One: Q-L 

Turning Point 

Undercurrent 

U.S. Steel Hour: Dr-L 

Voice of Firestone: Mu-L 


52,000 
23,500 
22,000 
33.500 
35.000 
11.500 
1 1 .000 
60,000 
32.000 

35.500 
Vi hr. 

15,000 
45,000 


P&C, B&B 

Warner-Lambert, Lennen & Newell, 

RCA. K&E 
Pharmaceuticals, Parkson; Marlboro, 

Burnett 
Amer Tobacco. BBDO; alt Socony 

Mobil Oil. Compton 

Pharmaceuticals. Parkson 

Schick. B&B; alt Scott, JWT 

P&C. Y&R; Brown & Williamson. Bates 
(L 9/19) 

U.S. Steel. BBDO 

Firestone. Sweeney & James 

Drackett. Y&R; Edsel. FC&B; Gen- 
eral Foods, B&B 

Philip Morris, Ayer 

Mennen, Mc-E; Miles. Wade 


Lawrence Welk: Mu-L 
What's My Line: Q-L 

Ed Wynn: Sc-F 
You Asked For It: M-F 
You Bet Your Life: Q-L 
Zorro: A-F 


14.500 
32,000 

40,000 
18.000 
51.750 
37.000 


Dodge, Grant 

Helene Curtis, Ludgin; Kellogg, Bur- 
nett 
L&M; Bulova, Mc-E (9/25 S) 
Skippy Peanut Butter, CBB 
Lever, JWT; Toni, North 
AC Spark Plug, Brother; 7-Up, JWT 


Specials and Spectaculars 


PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


Wagon Train: W-F 
Mike WaUace: I-L 
Wednesday Fights: Sp-L 


DuPont Show of The Month 

Bob Hope Show 

♦Shirley Temple's Storybook 


466,000 
320,000 
225,000 


DuPont, BBDO— 9/22 

Buick, McCann-Erickson— 9/19 

National Dairy, Ayer; Hill Bros. Cof- 
fee, Ayer— 9/12 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Local in management... 



The Corinthian stations are first and foremost local in character ... for great stations must 
be responsive to the needs and tastes of their individual communities. 

Each Corinthian station has its own independent local management team . . . experienced 
men at the helm and in the key operating areas of programming, sales, engineering and 
promotion. The strength of each of the Corinthian stations attests to the abilities of these 
men and the role they play in Tulsa, Houston, Fort Wayne and Indianapolis. 




THE CORINTHIAN STATIONS i?«^.«./^/% /« BrWc..//«^ 



1 ii I / A \u>ij \j fim/i mwiK .\\n\\\iinfiwf/ji 

K(;UL TV Houston • WAM- & WAN'IMV Ion Wayne • 



)\m\mMunn,A 



WISH cS: WISH-TV Indianapolis 



Interrelated in service 



The Corinthian stations have more than this. They benefit from each other's experience. 
And have at their disposal the full-time staff services of specialists in the basic areas of 
broadcasting. . . each outstandingly qualified in his field . . . Corinthian's Director of Program- 
ming, Robert H. Salk; Director of Sales, Don L. Kearney; Director of Engineering, George G. 
Jacobs; Director of Research, Charles H. Smith; and Director of Promotion & Advertising, 
Robert J. Sullivan. These men provide facts, judgment and the exchange of ideas upon 
which local management can base sound decisions. 

Clearly, you get something extra when you buy a Corinthian station. 




THE CORINTHIAN STKTIONS Responsibility m Broadcasting 

KOTV Tulsa • KGUL-TV Houston • WANE & WANE-TV Fort Wayne • WISH & WISH-TV Indianapolis 

>Mu\i,u\\di!/rf//y.«tti\iiin/;/f 



■■■■■llllinBHHBIIBa«MlillllllBPn«llt II i 1 1 1 J ill 




DAYTIME 



C O 



P A 



R. 



SUNDAY 

CBS 



MONDAY 

CBS 



TUESDAY 

CBS NBC 



reasure Hunt 

Dot Chem. 



Look Up & Livt 



flay Your Hunch 



Play Your Hunch 



Standard Bran 



Stand Brtndi 



Concentration 



Tic Tac Douth 
PftO til 

D ow (9/22 3) 



Tic Tac Dough 

Btand Brandt 

PAG 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

PftO 



It Could Be You 
alt P&O 



It Could Be Yei 

Al. CulTer alt »U5 

Brtllo 

lit P&O 



No net service 



Newt (1«-1:M) 



As the World 
PftG 

Sterling alt sust 



Howard Miller 



As the World 

Sterling alt 
Miles 



Howard Miller 



Beat The Clock 



Beat The Clock 

Miles 



Lucky Partners 

Al. CulTer alt s - 



Art Linkletter 



Art Linkletter 
alt Tool 



Big Payoff 



Today Is Ours 

Sterling (9/22 S) 



Verdict Is Yours 
S Und Brid i 
Brlitol-lfTm 



Who Do You 
Trust? 



From These Root 



American 

Bandstand 

Welsh 



College News 



The Last Word 



Face the Nation 



Mickey Mouse 
Chib 

Mars alt Armoui 



HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH & INDEX 



The network sche(3ule on this and preceding pages (46, 47) 
includes regularly scheduled programing 30 Aug. to 
26 Sept., inclusive (with possible exception of changes 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sched- 
uled programs to appear during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 



B 


"V 


G 


R 


A 1 


P 1 


i 


30 AUG.- 


26 SEPT. 


AK 


iDNESDAY 

BS NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 1 

ABC CBS NBC 1 




.ney 


Dough Re Ml 




For Love or 
Money 


Dough Re Mi 




For Love or 
Money 

.ust 


Dough Re Mi 
■u.t 




Heckle Jeckle 


Baklw ! 




ur Hunch 

tit nist 


Treasure Hunt 

Heinz 
OwD Prod 
alt P*Q 




Play Your Hunch 

sust 
Scott alt sust 


Treasure Hunt 

sust 
P&0 

alt sust 




Play Your HuncI 

sust 
Lever alt Gerber 


Treasure Hunt 

Gen Food* alt 
Sterling 




Mighty Mouse 

Gen Food, alt 

Colgate 


Ruff & Reddy 
Gen Food. 
lit nit 




Ccdfrey 

■1-Mi.r. 


Price Is Right 
G«n Food! 
8t«rllng 

General Foods 
alt sust 




Arthur Godfrey 

Gen Foods alt 
Stand Brands 


Price Is Right 

alt £«Ter BrM 

Miles alt sust 




Arthur Godfrey 

Gen Mills alt 
Eonson 


Price Is Right 

Lever alt Com Pro. 
General Foods 
Gen mils 




Capt. Kangaroo 

(11-12) 
Partlc. 
Gerber 


Fury 
Gen Food. 

alt Bordtn 




Dollar 
Uit* 


Heinz 
sust 




^'&.r" 


Concentration 
sust alt Lever 
Heinz alt sust 




^ttt^^' 


Concentration 

Gen Foods alt sus 
Lever alt sust 




Capt. Kangaroo 

Partic. 
Gen Mills 


Blondle 




of Life 

•ceutlcal. 


Tie Tac Dough 

Heinz 
alt sust 
Plllsbury 




Love of Life 

Scott 
Amer Homo 


Tic Tac Dough 

Al. Culver 

alt Heinz 

P&Q 




Love of Life 
AUtntli 

alt Gen Mills 


Tic Tac Dough 

Gen MUls alt 
Sunshine 
P*G 




"Tiir- 


True Story ! 

iUlt 

Staling Drag 

t 




l.tc'w 


It Could Be You 
0«n IVmxU alt 

suet 
Oi>m Prod 




Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 


it Could Be You 

Miles alt sust 

P&O alt 

Brwn & Wnuoo 




Search for 
P&G 


It Could Be Yoi 

Whitehall 

alt sust 

P&O 

alt Com Prod 




limmy Dean 


Detective Diary 
Staling Drag 




.« Light 


Culdlng^Llght 


Guld^g^Llght 




t lervlee 


Close-Up 




No net service 


Close-Up 

co-op 




No net service 


Close-Up 

co-op 




Lone Ranger 

Gen Mill, 
alt Ne.tle 


No net servic* . 




'Til? . 


News 
(1:25-1:30) init 


(1:J5-1:S0) luit) 




« World 

g alt iust 


Howard Milter 

co-op 




As the World 
Turns 


Howard Miller 




As the World 
Turns 
P&G 


Howard Miller 

co-op 




Baseball Preview 

Gen Mills 

(10 mln. preceed- 

Ing game) 


No net s«r*ic« 






.-OP 


Swift 
alt SUrling 




Plll.buiT 




-he Clock 

' alt sust 
.It Lerer 


Lucky Partners 

sust 




Beat The Clock 

Johnaon & JohuoD 
alt (uat 


Lucky Partners 

iUSt 




Beat The Clock 
Lwer alt Kodak 

Gerber 
alt sust 


Lucky Partners 




Baseball Games 
of the week 

State Farm Ins. Oo. 

Falstaff Brew 

(2-concl.) 


No net servico 




inkletter 
•r Broi 
itlintU 


Haggis Baggis 




Art LInkletter 
Kellogg 
Plllsbury 


Haggis Baggis 




Art Linkletter 
Irfver Bros 
Swift alt 


Haggis Baggis 

Gen Mills alt sus 






Gen. Mills 

(6/14-9/6; 
alt weeks) 


llN 


Payoff 


Today Is Ours 

P&G 

Heinz alt 
Sterling 


American 

Bandstand 

co-op 


Big Payoff 
■u.t 


Today Is Ours 

P&G alt sust 
Culver alt Heinz 


American 

Bandstand 

oo-op 


"V.v.f 


Today Is Ours 
P&G 

Sterling 






NCAA Football 
Games 

Bayvik Cigars 




Is Yours 


Torn These Roots 

P&G alt sust 


Who Do You 
Trust? 
Gen rood. 


Verdict Is Yours 

Sterling alt sust 


From These Roots 

^ P&G 


Who Do You 
Trust? 


Verdict Is Yours 

Gen mils alt Leve 
Gen MllU 
alt Atlantis 


From These Root 

alt sust 






(Vi sponsorship) 
various times 
various dates 






^°a"r"p5f ^' ^Il'es a" ="«' 


nil 


Tllng 

IS,"** 


Queen for a Day 
•It Cbm Prod 


American 
Bandstand 

Sergeant 
Com Product. 


Brighter Day 
P&G 


Queen for a Day 
Bm. & WBion alt 


American 
Bandstand 
Omi. U11U 

Welch 


Brighter Day 
P&G 


Queen for a Day 

WhitehaU 
alt Com Prod 






U.S. Lawn 

Tennis Assn. 

National 

(9/6: 12-5) 


111 


t storm 

Inn* Pml 


Secret Storm 

Scott alt 


Miles alt Culver 


Secret Storm 




.fNight 


P&G 


American 

Bandstand 

partle & co-op 


Edge of Night 
Pllliburr 




Bandstand 


EdgeofNIght 


P&G 




sust 




*n« 


»rfUlk alt 


i^odern Romances 
St«rllnc Drug 

alt Heinz 


Modern Romance 


Swift 
alt 


Sterling Drug alt 






Woodpecker 

Kollogg 






The Buccaneers 

Com Prod 












1? 






Mickey Mouse 

alt Gen Foods 






Mickey Mouse 

Club 

Gen MllU 
















grams not 
a.m., Monde 
A^eM;5 Specie 
Whitehall) ; 
participating 
a.m., Monda 


listed are: 
ly-Friday, pa 
il, CBS, Sun 
Today, NBC. 
; News CBS 
y-Friday. 


Tonight, NB( 
rticipating s 
day, 11-11:1^ 
7:00-9:00 a 
, 7:45-8:00 


:, 11:15 p. 
jonsorship ; 
) p.m. (Car 
m., Monday- 
a.m. and 8: 


in..l:00 
Sunday ai 
er and 
Friday, si 
45-9:00 o 


All times ar 
e not listed b 
Sponsors, co 
lown along w 
nighttime pi 
id agencies st 


B Eastern D 
ecause in ma 
-sponsors an 
ith names oJ 
ograms, toge 
arts on page 


lylight. Parti 
ny cases they 
d alternate-w 
programs. A 
ther with sho 
44. 


^ipating spon 
fluctuate. 
3ek sponsors 
Iphabetical in 
w costs, spon 


ors 

are 
dex 

5ors 




') f> Like many a famous twosome, 
"Mr. Adams and Eve" are strictly one of a kind. They offer regional and local advertisers: 
More entertainment: 39 sophisticated half-hours starring Ida Lupino and Howard Duff as 
a well-known Hollywood couple. With guests like Joan Fontaine, Dick Powell, Ed Sullivan. 
More applause: "A very funny situation comedy. It is not often that a Hollywood television 
film is so pertinent," jack gould, new york times. "Whippy dialogue, good performances. 



CHECK YOUR MATCHMAKING: 

/<yj3Una aiuEpej^ puB uojj3>luid j-j /,-9 
uAaiog suuy puE niA -^JUsh cl'S^ 

U31UJB3 puB SSOf UOQ g-^? 

SBjuoqBDOj puB qjiius uqof uiBjdB^ g-g 

(3Ag) ouidriT npi puB (suiBpy JJAl) yna pjbmoh n-2 

suiqdasof puB uo3|odBt\i qI'I 




topnotch stints," variety. "A darned happy marriage of Duffs and dialogue," cue magazine. 
More audiences: "Mr. Adams and Eve" enters syndication direct from a two-season run on 
the CBS Television Network. In its Friday night time slot, the program rated an average 
21.5 Nielsen. Match up your product with "Mr. Adams and Eve"— a winning combination. 



New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, Boston, St. Louis, 
Dallas, San Francisco, Atlanta. In Canada: S. W. Caldwell, Ltd. 



IM Weiisien Film lales jni.^ 



With network schedules about to be released, SPONSOR ASKS 

How will independents program 

against network competition ? 



Four major independent gtations 
reveal their programing strategy 
in the coming fall battle against 
highly competitive net lineup 



Ted Cott, 'ice pres. in charge of KMSP- 
Tl & other NTA owned & operated stations 




More and more each year the inde- 
pendent station is taking its toll of the 
network station's audience. KMSP-TV, 
our Minneapolis-St. Paul station, in a 
highly competitive market, moved into 
third place in the last Nielsen report. 
Specialized programing for children, 
local sporting events, hard-hitting pro- 
grams and extensive feature film 
libraries are annually making the pub- 
lic more conscious of "the other 
station in town." The advertiser thus 
gains a low-cost opportunity to reach 
large numbers of people with the true 
formula of advertising, which is repe- 
tition. 

Only with the independents can the 
national spot advertiser and the local 
advertiser reach the people in prime 
time, and the size of the audience they 
reach is growing each year. 

The independent is gaining strength 
because of the "copy cat" programing 
of the networks, where the choice is 
between three westerns or two variety 
shows, leaving those who want alter- 
nate programing uncovered. As this 
material is made available to them, 
they are finding it, liking it and 
making it a habit. 

And as the independent continues 
gaining respect and support of the 
national advertiser and local adver- 
tiser he is financially equipped to in- 
crease his program service which in 
turn results in increased advertising 
opportunities. On the independent <Jta- 



tion, the people in Minneapolis don't 
have to watch a woman in Los Angeles 
win a refrigerator. This fall she will 
watch her neighbor down the street 
A'.'in one on KMSP. 

Fred M. Thrower, vice pres. & gen. 
mgr., WPIX, New York 



Vertical block 
programing 
by category 



WPIX will not program against the 
networks this fall. We never have. 
Our approach is more positive. WPIX 
will continue to attract a substantial 
share of the New York audience by 
programing every half hour with the 
finest syndicated films — properties of 
"network" quality. 

Programs like Whirlyhirds, Colonel 
Flack, Decoy and Silent Service will 
always get "first preference" from 
large numbers of viewers regardless of 
what's playing the networks. And 
WPIX has many such fine first-run 
programs ready for the new season. 

WPIX points to its leadership in 
children's programing in New York 
where we beat all seven stations in 
these time periods most of the year. 
In other areas we are fourth most of 
the time, third many times and second 
or first not infrequently. 

With an eye to improving this 
position, WPIX will embark upon a 
new and exciting programing concept 
next season. Over 30 new WPIX half- 
hours (half of which are first-run in 
New York, the others, first-run off the 
networks) will form the backbone of 
this new format: vertical block pro- 
graming, by category, seven full nights 
a week. 

Monday night will be Adventure 
Night: seven successive half -hours 
starting at 7:30, of strictly adventure 
type shows. In like manner, Tuesday 
night will be Sports Night; Wednes- 



day, Mystery Night; Thursday, Com- 
edy Night; Friday, will be Drama 
Night; Saturday, Movie Night; and 
Sunday, Family Night. 

We are excited about the potential 
of this highly promotable concept 
which will give WPIX-11 a new and 
distinct image in a somewhat scram- 
bled seven-station market. 

Obviously, it takes a lot of quality 
product to program in this manner 
night after night. Every "night" repre- 
sents over a quarter-million dollars in 
production and talent. WPIX has a 
"network look" to it. 

In a sense, then, WPIX does pro- 
gram against the networks, and every- 
body else. We program to win as 
many as possible of the "viewer votes" 
cast every half-hour. 

When WPIX gets a 5.0 rating, net- 
work shows must get five to eight 
times this rating to get a comparable 
cost-per-1,000. More and more adver- 
tisers are becoming aware of this basic 
truth, and WPIX is delighted to have 
them with us. 

Bennef Korn, vice president, WABD, 
New York 




What does the independent station 
rely on when bucking the networks in 
this market? Three elements — ingenu- 
ity, taste and daring. 

We depend on the aspect of counter- 
point programing and diversification, 
which has earned us an unduplicated 
957c coverage of the 4,700,000 homes 
in this area. In those time segments 
where comedy is the major contribu- 
tion of the networks, we will turn to 
a block of adventure shows. In those 
time periods where dramas and west- 
erns dominate network thinking, we 
{Please turn to page 59) 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



tt 



Time-buyers gotta be tough! 



99 




"Sentiment's got no place in figuring the RIGHT time-buy, buddy. When 
it comes to getting the most for a client's dollar, give me facts — the 
straight, most recent facts, I mean. 

"Like the way I figure KFWB in the Los Angeles market is what I'm 
talking about. Color Radio on KFWB's Channel 98 is the kind of new, 
exciting radio that has pulled listeners right in close. 



"Cold hard facts tell the story: as of July, Hooper shows KFWB as the 
NUMBER ONE station in the market ... with a solid 95.5% gain in 
share-of-audience. Nielsen is UP 82.7% ... and Pulse is UP 37.1% . . . 
all since January. 

"So, buddy, here's one time-buyer who's quit buying stations strictly 
by ear... or by 'tradition'. The smart time-buyer will always buy 
KFWB . . . first in Los Angeles. It's the thing to do!" 




Call or write for your copy of this fact-filled 

brochure: "TIME-BUYING FOR FUN AND CkourhnaiC 

PROFIT". Loaded with lots of handy tools 

which make it easy to buy Color Radio. 



98 




6419 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD, HOLLYWOOD 28 HOLLYWOOD 3 5151 



ROBERT M. PURCELL, president and general manager •MILTON H.KLEIN, sales manager 
Represented nationally by JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



HPL families opei 





4000,QOi^xans a day ! 



They're not just radio listeners— they're cus- 
tomers. To them, the HPL Director's product 
approval is a personal, positive recommenda- 
tion to buy. In 1 1 of the nation's biggest mar- 
kets, a half million families hear it, believe it 
and act on it every day. No program has a 
more responsive audience. 
The Housewives' Protective League does 
just what its name suggests: it protects the 
housewife, sponsoring only those products 
which measure up to the highest consumer 
standards. Your product is virtually sold on 
our word . Then H PL, in partnership with the 
food distributors, lends powerful sales and 
merchandising support to your campaign. 
This is how HPL has been serving the can- 
ning industry for 24 years. Now, "September 
is Canned Foods Month" and HPL promo- 
tion is again lifting tops ... off cans and sales 
records. THE 

HOUSEWIVES' 
PROTECTIVE 

T "I~~^ A /^ 'T' TT~^ REPRESENTED BV CBS RADIO 
I |H /\ I ,_- I |H SPOT SALES, 485 MADISON AVE., 

JH Jik JA jLVJ^ \^ JL-J NEW YORK 22, N. Y. PL 1-2345 

"The Program That Sponsors the Product" 

HPL DIRECTORS: CRAIG HARRISON, KCBS, San Francisco; GRANT WILLIAMS, KMOX, 
St. Louis; PHILIP NORMAN, KNX, Los Angeles; GRANT WILLIAMS, KSL, Salt Lake City; 
LEWIS MARTIN, WRVA, Richmond; JOHN TRENT, WCAU, Philadelphia; GALEN DRAKE, 
WGBS. New York; ALLEN GRAY, WCCO, Minneapolis-St. Paul; MORGAN BAKER, WEEI, 
Boston; PAUL GIBSON, WBBM, Chicago; MARK EVANS, WTOP, Washington, D. C. 




IF IT IS BIG 

AND IMPORTANT, 
IT'S ON VifHAS-TV 




WHAS-TV NEWS with 

Exclusive Daily Newsreel . . . 

Winner of the University of 

Kentucky-A.P. "Distinguished 

Leadership Award" and Sigma 

Delta Chi Award. 

12:25-12:30 p.m. daily 

6:15- 6:30 p.m. daily 

10:30-10:40 p.m. daily 



WHAS-TV's nine-man news staff and 26 
newsrcel-reporter correspondents provide 
unmatched coverage of the BIG news . . . 
the southeastern Kentucky floods, the 
Prestonsburg school bus tragedy, the big- 
gest private home robbery in U.S. history, 
and the $250,000 Federal Building fire. 
The journalistic magazine THE 
QUILL devoted its May editorial, cover 
and three full pages to WHAS-TV's cov- 



erage of the Kentucky legislature. 

When anything IMPORTANT hap- 
pens in Louisville television, it happens 
on WHAS-TV. Viewers know it . . . and 
so do clients such as Shell Oil . . . and 
the Greater Louisville First Federal Sav- 
ings and Loan Association which has 
sponsored the news EVERY night since 
WHAS-TV went on the air in March, 
1950. 




Your Advertising Deserves WHAS-TV Attention . . . 
with the ADDED IMPACT OF PROGRAMMING OF CHARACTER I 



WHAS-TV 

Foremost In Service 
Best In Entertainment 



WHAS-TV CHANNEL 11, LOUISVILLE 

316,000 WATTS — CBS-TV NETWORK 

Victor A. Sholis, Director 

Represented Nationally by 
HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS, INC. 



SPONSOR • SKPTEMBKR 1958 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Cont'd from page 54) 

air sports or comedy. This is based 
on the fact that in the Metropolitan 
New York area with millions of people, 
there is a sizable percentage interested 
in different types of programing. 

We have pioneered in the presenta- 
tion of personalities. Nightbeat, a pro- 
gram that singlehandedly altered the 
interviewing technique, was a natural 
for a local station. We are continuing 
to present programs that take advan- 
tage of the geographic location of our 
tv station — New York City, a place 
that boasts of the greatest array of 
interesting people in the world. The 
well-handled interview giving an in- 
sight into the personality of celebrities 
and real people is a must. 

We have developed a public service 
and journalism documentary approach 
of which we are most proud. Within a 
single year we have presented such 
special programs as the live coverage 
of the Senate Labor Racket Hearings; 
the much lauded Operation Heart 
Saver, which televised a heart opera- 
tion before live cameras; Portrait of 
the USSR, a six-part documentary 
series, presenting the most complete 
essay on Russia seen on television ; and 
still another documentary currently 
being shown on the Middle East crisis. 

Dick Woolen, film director and assistant 
prof;ram director, KTTV, Los Angeles 



Ignore 
networks, 
program for 
L.A. vieivers 



KTTV in Los Angeles does not pro- 
gram against the three network outlets. 
Just the opposite. KTTV programs 
only for Los Angeles viewers, sched- 
uling shows at the time and day that 
we believe Southern Californians want 
to see them — not at a time and day 
convenient for the nation as a whole. 
A tv program is more subject to 
localized preferences than any product 
' that has ever been merchandised. All 
television is local to the viewer, for 
he dials a local station and chooses 
between local stations. We proved this 
to our satisfaction during a recent 
survey among 30,000 viewers which 
showed that only a small percentage 




could correctly identify the network, 
or even the station. 

Viewing preference is different in 
Los Angeles from the East where the 
majority of national programing de- 
cisions are made. The reason is that 
the seven Los Angeles stations de- 
veloped wholly on their own. During 
their first three or four years — the 
formative years — there were no micro- 
wave connections with any other 
community. The stations, competing 
fiercely for their share of audience, 
adapted themselves to local habits and 
tastes since all their resources and all 
their ingenuity were directed only to- 
ward winning the local audience. 

Los Angeles is a unique example of 
the force and effect of localized tele- 
vision. For example, the highest rated 
program in Los Angeles so far this 
year has been a KTTV presentation— 
the station's coverage of the "Miss 
Universe Contest." The 48 rating and 
80.8 share of audience (ARE) at 
11 p.m. was a fantastic 8.9 times that 
of the three network stations totaled 
together and more than four times that 
of all six other competing stations 
added together. Closest competition 
was nearly 45 rating points behind. 

Specifically, KTTV will this fall 
program for Los Angeles viewers such 
syndicated properties as Highway 
Patrol and Citizen Soldier. 

It will continue to bolster its day- 
time syndicated shows — My Little 
Margie, Topper, Frontier Doctor — 
with such popular Los Angeles person- 
alities as Jackson Wheeler, Sheriff 
John, etc. hosting the programs. It will 
continue to program George Putnam 
and the News twice daily and Paul 
Coates 10:15 Confidential File nightly. 
Its MGM movie library will be utilized 
for nightly First Show and Second 
Show at 10:40 p.m. and 12:10 a.m. 
And it will present for the first time 
on tv in the Los Angeles area such 
films as National Velvet, San Fran- 
cisco, The Green Years, etc. 

It will video tape college football 
games played in Los Angeles for tele- 
casting the following day; it will 
present the remaining Los Angeles 
Dodgers baseball games played in San 
Francisco and microwaved to Southern 
California and it will program in the 
early afternoon NTA's TV Hour of 
Stars. KTTV will continue its hour- 
long Divorce Court. 

And it will schedule its programs at 
the time and day preferred by South- 
ern Californians. 



|\>'1f**% 



i^^^^%mHM^ 




:*!ii? 




If you're measuring size of metropoli- 
tan markets, Fort Wayne ranks 108th. 
If you're measuring spot radio, WOWO, 
located in Fort Wayne, covers tiie 37th 
Radio IViarket . WOWO is the only 
medium that covers the 2,285,720 
people in this rich 56-county market. 
If you're buying top radio markets, you 
must include . . . 



®A)©WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

•Broadcasting, December 16, 1957 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NOW! JUST RELEASED NCS #3 FIGURES 

REVEAL WHAT ADVERTISERS HAVE LONG KNOWN . . . 



WFAA-TV 



is a "MUST BUY' 

in one of the nations "MUST MARKETS!' 




TV HOMES 

in the vast market coverage area of WFAA-TV! 

(based on NCS S3) 



DALLAS & FT. WORTH - the nation's 12th 
ranking metropoHtan market in terms of retail 
sales - as well as its rich surrounding trade 
area - now substantiated to be under the 
powerful signal of WFAA - TV ! 



FOR AN AMAZING LOOK AT WHAT YOUR TV DOLLAR 
WILL BUY IN DALLAS TODAY CALL OUR 
PETR. I AAAN ^o** ci closer look at some very revealing 
facts on NCS #3. 



WFAA-TV DALLAS a 



A television service of 

The Dallas Morning News 

Edward Fetry & Co. National Representatives 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



^ SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Warner-Lambert Pharmaceuticals Co., Family Products Div., 
Morris Plains, N.H., is planning a campaign in major markets for 
its Verisan cold remedy. The schedule kicks-off 15 September for 
12 weeks. Minutes during daytime and late evening segments will 
be placed; average frequency: 5-10 per week per market. The 
buyer is Conant Sawyer; the agency is Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

Minute Maid Corp., Orlanda, Fla., is going into top markets to 
push its Minute Maid quick frozen concentrate. The campaign 
starts 8 September, runs through the end of October. Minutes and 
chainbreaks are being used, during both daytime and nighttime 
slots; frequency depends upon the market. The buyer is Bob 
Gruskay; the agency is Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

Frigidaire Divocion, General Motors Corp., Dayton, is Hning up 
announcements to advertise its Frigidaire automatic washers and 
electric dryers. The short-termer, a test campaign, starts 15 Septem- 
ber. Minute and two-minute announcements will be slotted during 
nighttime segments. The buyer is Jim Kearns; the agency is Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., New York. 

E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Polychemical Depart- 
ment, Wilmington, is lining up 30-minute slots during prime time in 
top markets for the Fall for a football prediction show to promote 
its Zerone and Zerex anti-freezes. The program will run through 
the football season. The buyer is Ted Wallower; the agency is 
Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc., New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

The Ki'wi Polish Co., Pottstown, Pa., is entering major markets 
to push its Kiwi shoe polish. The schedules start 8 September for 
eight weeks. Minutes, both daytime and nighttime, will be scheduled. 
Frequency depends upon the market. The buyer is Manny Klein; 
the agency is Cohen & Aleshire. 

The Best Foods, Inc., New York, is preparing campaigns for top 
markets for its H. 0. Oats and Instant Oatmeal. A six-week cam- 
paign starts 15 September. Another six-week run starts 6 January. 
Minutes during daytime segments will be placed; frequency varies 
from market to market. The buyer is Bob Anderson; the agency 
is Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, Inc., New York. 

RADIO and TV BUYS 

The American Sugar Refining Co., New York, is planning a 
radio and tv campaign for its Domino sugar. The campaign begins 
15 September for 13 weeks. In tv, minutes during both daytime 
and nighttime segments will be aired; in radio, daytime minutes. 
Frequencies will vary from market to market. The buyer is Jerry 
Van Horsen; the agency is Ted Bates & Co., New York. 




It's Simply 

a Matter of People! 

If all the people In Buffalo (1,340,000), 
Providence (705,000), and Nashville, 
Tenn. (363,000) got together, they 
would almost total the big, bustling 
market reached by WOWO, the 37th 
Radio Market. 

If you're buying top radio markets, you 
must include . . . 

\ A#^>\A#r> 50,000 WATTS 

W^^ W^/ 37th U.S. Radio Market* 

FORT WAYNE, IND. Represented by PGW 

@A@WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING CO!«!?ANY, INC. 

•Broadcasting, December 16, 1957 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



i# 



l^< 




The Adventures of 

WILLIAM 

^F ^^ I I delivers smashing 
I ^H Ihi Ihi impact that 
viewers and sales will feel. Action that 
stops you cold. Adventure that 
leaves you breathless. Excitement that 
bristles with tension and suspense. 
You know how popular 
swashbucklers are these days. Well, 
WILLIAM TELL has everything 
they've got — and more. The beloved 
legends of the famous man who 
fought for his country's independence. 
Thrilling battles against injustice. 
A fight for a man's love for his 
wife and child. 

All this set against the inspiring 
beauty of the Swiss Alps . . . where 
these 39 great half -hours were 
filmed , . . with gorgeous production 
values and superb photography. 
What more could you ask — except to 
see audition prints of this socko 
entertainment that's sure to produce 
sales haymakers — from . . . 



NTA 



National Telefilm Associates, Inc. 
Coliseum Tower. 10 Columbus Circle 
New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 2-7300 




THE 

DRIVER'S 

SEAT 

IN 

GREATER 
BUFFALO 




Still ridiiiji high as the No. 1 static 
Buffalo uith: 



1)>^ far in the nation's 14th market. WGR-TV is delivering Booming 



• Largest Share of Buffalo's Virwina Audience — from sign-on to sign-off 7 da\'s a week — and a larger 
audience than the other two stations coinbiiird. noon to 6:00 p.m. weekdays. 

• Top Local Shoics and Personalities: \\v\vn X(\illf. Buffalo's leading lady of tele\ision — Bill Mazer, 
Buffalo's top sportscaster — Ro\ kcms. Bufl.ilo's .mthoritathf news \oice. Highest ratings — more viewers 
per set — low cost per thousand. 

• Superior Local Acceptance: Emphasis on local programming, promotion, and ci\ic participation has 
made Channel 2 an important and u ideK' recognized asset to the business and home life in the Buffalo area. 

• Superb Studio Facilities: Most extensive (60 x 40 feet) facilities in Buffalo. Additional features include 
outdoor tennis court and outdoor patio. 

• Tremendous Bonus in Canada: Coverage of over 800,000 sets. 

• Strongest Merchandising in Toun: Tailor-made point-of-sale material throughout the \\'GR-T\" area. 
Regular mailings for WGR-T\' ad\(itised prodticts to 925 grocers and 52.5 drncgists. Contact Peters, 
Griffin, Woodward for availahilitics on WGR-TV. 

TOP CHOICE IN BUFFALO OF ADVERTISERS AND VIEWERS ALIKE 



WGR-TV 



NNEL 2 BUFFALO 



A TRANSCO 

WROC-TV, Rochester, 
WGR, WGR-TV, Buffalo 



)NTINENT STATION pfj ^v"'^ 

Y. . WSVA. WSVA-TV, Harrisonburg, Va. |^B 

1 . WNEP-TV. Scrantcn/Wilkes-Barre. llUll Servi 




SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Marketing tools, trends, 
research data and trade tips 



FILM-SCOPE 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 With 1 October starting dates just around the corner, the fall syndication 

picture is beginning to take shape. At this point, it looks something like this: 

(1) First-run sales are catching fire; most have achieved a 50-market minimum. 

(2) Re-runs, with no set air dates, are moving more slowly. 
Here's a look at how some first-run product is doing thus far: 

• Screen Gems' only syndicated release, Rescue 8, has contracted for 75 markets, in- 
cluding three eight-market regional deals. 

• CNP's new show. Danger is My Business, is sold in 85 markets. 

• Ziv's shows, Mackenzie's Raiders and Dial 999, have both been cut in for major re- 
gional business. Mackenzie's Raiders, with B&W and Schlitz among its multi-market sponsors, 
is slotted in 63 markets; Dial 999, with Pillsbury in 30 markets, is signed in a total of 81 
markets. 

• CBS TV Film's venture into comedy, Colonel Flack, is lined up in more than 50 
markets. 

• TPA's New York Confidential, with DX Sunray Oil in 62 markets, is slotted for a 
total of 115. 

Budweiser, via D'Arcy, is expanding its original U. S. Marshall (NTA) alternate- 
week buy to between 80 and 90 markets, from an original 55. 

The agency is currently undertaking what often is a station problem: Finding the alter- 
nate-week sponsor in all those markets. 



Don't assume that being a network subsidiary means an easy entre for a syn- 
dicator into his networks affiliate stations, or even its o&o's. 

CBS TV Film, especially, finds its own stations the toughest to sell this fall. 
Reason is obvious: the continuing pattern of early and late feature shows leaves less 
time for a syndicated series. 



It looks like the summer sales doldrums are over for MAC and its Paramount 
library. 

Three sales of the full library this week bring the market tally to 12, and a return of 
well over half of MCA's $50 million investment. 

Buyers this week: KIRO-TV, Seattle-Tacoma ; KPIX, San Francisco (for a reported $4 
million) ; and KHQ-TV, Spokane. 

Other markets previously sold: New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, Washing- 
ton (partial sale), Sacramento (also partially). Grand Rapids, Omaha, Guam. 



Those national advertisers who have been drifting toward syndication buys are 
doing so primarily in the smaller markets. 

Note what one top agency vice-president this week told Film-Scope: "Our clients are 
definitely interested in market-by-market buying and we're doing plenty of research on the 
subject. But so far we can't see a strong advantage in the multi-station markets." 

This comment is born out by BAR's second-quarter report of national advertisers who 
use spot film in the top markets. Compare it with last year's second-quarter report and you'll 
find the list diminished considerably. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Key trends and developments 
in marketing and research 



^ MARKETING WEEK 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 Campaigns tying in two or more different products are not new but they are be- 

coming more important because they offer a wedge for multi-displays in consumer 
retail outlets. 

Here are three tie-in campaigns, two of them involving air media, now under way for 
the fall. Each goes about it in a different way: 

• Domino Sugar, via Ted Bates, is harnessing tv, radio, newspapers and maga- 
zines behind a "Used Together . . . They Sell Together" theme. 

In addition to the consumer campaign, Domino is putting out a Fall Planning 
Guide for retailers. This urges stores to team Domino sugar with related items 
and illustrates p-o-s material as well. 

The Guide puts special emphasis on tie-in products for chocolate frosting. Besides Dom- 
ino Confectioners 10-X powdered sugar, such a promotion would include baking chocolate, 
vanilla extract and butter or margarine. 

• Mattel, Inc., which uses Mickey Mouse Club, will have its toy guns promoted 
on tv by General Mills, too. 

GM is running a "Great Guns Sweepstakes" for Kix, Trix and Sugar Jets during 
September and October. About 16,000 guns will be given as prizes. 

Fifteen filmed spots, featuring kid actor Lars Henderson — seen regularly on 
the Mattel MM segment — will be used by the cereal manufacturer on the Captain 
Kangaroo, Lone Ranger and Mickey Mouse Club shows. In addition, 10 million ce- 
real packages will carry four-color pictures of the guns. 

• Campbell is tying in soup and its own Swanson products in a "Souper-Duper 
Chicken" promotion this month. 

Stores will be offered a scotch plaid design re-usable dump-display bin to carry 
out the budget theme of the promotion. Supporting material will include display bin cards, 
recipe pads and ad mats plus a consumer campaign in supplements and magazines. 

Five products in all are involved — Cream of chicken, celery and mushroom soups 
with Swanson boned chicken and turkey. 



New marketing concepts in the cosmetic field are in the wind, according to an 
ad vet in this field. 

Look particularly for copy lines incorporating the "new and improved" gim- 
mick, a label not used in the cosmetics industry until early in 1958 when Revlon pitched it. 
Traditional approach is to bring out a completely new product. 



Concentrated marinade piquante, bouillabaisse, lobster Newburg, spiced Cherry 
Heering preserve, babas au rhum. 

Doesn't sound much like a General Foods line, but it is. The products above were 
among the seven introduced by GF at the fourth annual Fancy Food and Confection 
Show at the Waldorf-Astoria recently. 

How come? GF doesn't expect much volume from its gourmet foods, which it began 
distributing last year, but three solid reasons for selling them were given by Joseph B. 
Starke, manager of GF's gourmet foods operation: 

They were (1) to contribute ultimately in a modest way to GF's profits, (2) 
to give more class to the GF corporate image and (3) to uncover new products 
suitable for mass distribution. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



^ WASHINGTON WEEK 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 

Copyright l»58 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Congress may be gone, but some of its activities linger. At least as to their 
effects. 

Nothing firm in the way of plans as yet, but the Senate Commerce Committee may have 
some reports of more than passing interest. Probably not Committee reports, but rather staff 
documents. 

That committee looked into tv allocations problems, rating services, and has kept a con- 
tinuing eye on network operations. It has also been following the FCC's progress with its own 
Barrow report on network practices, and very closely. In addition, there were hearings on 
the ASCAP-BMI embroglio. 

Of all of the fields in which the Committee has been interested during this session just 
closed, allocations and rating services seem the likeliest candidates for pungent 
comments. 

There is still some chance of New York hearings on ratings, in which case even a staff 
report would be unlikely this year. The report is likely to be less critical of the rating serv- 
ices than it will be with respect to the heavy dependence on them by networks and sponsors. 

In the field of allocations, the Committee will likely be much less interested in uhf than 
it has been in the past. The FCC will probably be exhorted to continue its efforts to try to 
put more vhf stations on the iar. 

The Commerce Committee appeared to be impressed, both with the ABC plan for "drop- 
ins" on new vhf stations on present channels, and also with the Craven plan for securing more 
spectrum space through a trade with the military. 



The Senate Commerce Committee, although it frequently disagrees with its 
staff on methods, still remains anxious to make provision for more tv stations. 

The FCC's report on tv industry finances in 1957 adds more proof that new stations, 
except in highly selective areas such as would be served under the ABC drop-in plan, run 
into stiff going. 

Uhf is an old story. But the report shows uhf losses climbed from $1.9 million in 1956 
to $3.5 million in 1957, with 11 going dark during the year. Only 23 of 95 operating all 
or a part of '57 reported profits, and the year wound up with only 88 in operation. 

More significant, of the post-freeze vhf stations, 303 of them, just 162 reported 
profitable operation. Of 28 which went on the air in 1957, 25 reported their experiences 
and 20 of these showed losses. 

The story is even clearer when viewed against the overall tv picture. Total tv industry 
broadcast revenues rose 5.2 percent in 1957 to $943.2 million. Total expenses increased even 
more, 10.7 percent to $783.2 million. Profits before Federal taxes, therefore, fell 15.6 per- 
cent to $160 million. 

Network share of the revenues was $467.9 million, 95 pre-freeze vhfs accounted for $261.3 
million, but the best the 302 post-freeze v's could do was $187.3 million, with the uhf's ac- 
counting for a negligible $26.7 million. 

Web expenses were $397.2 million, those of the 95 pre-freeze v's were $179.3 million, the 
302 post-freeze v's disbursed $176.5 million, and the u's spent $30.2 million. 

Web profits were $70.7 million, the 95 pre-freeze v's took down $82 million and all 302 
post-freeze v's between them shared only $10.8 million. 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




A round-up of trade talks, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 

Copyright 1958 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



, The mediuni-sized agencies continue to snag away accounts in competition 
M ith the giants. 

Only recently Keyes, Madden & Jones won out over McCann-Erickson in the bid 
for the Florist Association business. And now Fuller & Smith & Ross emerges as 
victor over Y&R and BBDO for the American Optical ($200,000) account. 



From present indications, the last brand in Detroit that will reveal its 1959 models 
is Edsel. 

It also looks as though that division is a long way from a decision about its ad- 
vertising campaign and general ballyhoo. 

Interesting sidelight on changing authority in the ad agencies: In the major 
shops, the selection of a network tv buy is the joint recommendation of the media 
and program departments. 

Their recommendation is passed on to the account section, which holds the power 
to veto rather than recommend. 

It takes a year for an agency to digest and recover its investment in a new 
account — that is, reach the break-even point. 

The rule-of -thumb works this way: There's no profit in the first six months of billings. 
The net from the billings for the next six months pays for the first six months of 

work and the investment in basic research. 



Don't be surprised if the Civil Aeronautics Bureau turns to the FCC as well 
as the FTC for help in suppressing the traffic in free airline rides for free air plugs. 

Involved most deeply in the practice are giveaway and variety shows. 

As a result of this evasion of CAB regulations forbidding trade-outs, quite a business 
in cutrate airline tickets has sprung up. 



Looking gift horses in the mouth has become the habit of a major spot agency 
on Madison Avenue. 

Only this week it got a pitch from a Southern station offering three free D time 
spots for each three paid B class spots. The station referred to it as "special summer- 
end deal." 

The agency's check revealed that all the station's accounts were not getting the same 
proposition. So the sale blew up because the offer was just another under-the-counter 
rate cut. 



NBC TV was trying hard this week to salvage a tentative order from General 
Mills for a piece of the new EUery Queen series. 

The miller elected to withdraw when ABC TV moved the Disney show opposite 
the mystery on Friday nights. 

On the other hand, the Disney switch brought a two-fold protest from JWT, which 
didn't fancy the idea of 1) its Ozzie & Harriet series being deprived of Disney as a front- 
runner Wednesday nights, and 2) having it in competition with the Jackie Gleason show 
(CBS TV). 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 





THIS TOOTHPASTE TASTES GOOD!" 



He's trying a product he saw advertised on WGN-TV. And he's sold! 
The program was The Honeymooners where he and 716,000* other folks 
watched— and were sold. (*Nielsen— June 8— July 12, 1958). 
Whether you want to reach children or adults— WGN-TV's top pro- 
gramming delivers the kind of audience that meets your needs. 

That's why Top Drawer Advertisers use WGN-TV. 

Keep your eyes on WGN-TV this fall, because more and more top 
drawer advertisers are buying WGN-TV first in Chicago. 



The station that puts "GEE!" in your Chicago sales! 



WON -TV 

Chicagoans watch Channel 9 




6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaigns 



^ TV RESULTS 



GAS 

SPONSOR: I'i.iliuonl .Nalural (ias Company AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule ease history: Seven years ago, natural gas was 
introduced into the Charlotte area. Due to the newness of 
the product, a certain amount of natural resistance was 
encountered. In order to combat the problem, the Piedmont 
Natural Gas Company turned to television. They decided 
to sponsor a weather telecast on WSOC-TV, Charlotte, N. C, 
to link natural gas with a valuable public service program 
in the public mind. For seven years, Piedmont continued 
sponsorship of Channel 9 Weather, and watched acceptance, 
sales and good will grow. Each year, company officials 
watched with satisfaction as more and more people turned 
to gas. In July of 1958 so widespread was the acceptance 
of natural gas, that the company was enabled to reduce rates 
to their residential and commercial customers. The company 
attributes a good part of the switching to natural gas to the 
show. "Your station has played a major part in our suc- 
cess," said J. J. Sheehan, Piedmont v.p. in charge of sales. 
WSOC-TV, Charlotte Weather program 



FERTILIZER 

SPONSOR: Schuler Fertilizer Company AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Schuler Fertilizer Coinpany of 
Marshall, Minnesota purchased a schedule on KELO-TV, 
Sioux Falls, South Dakota to advertise PEP, a plant ferti- 
lizer. KELO-TV operates booster stations in Reliance, S. D. 
(KPLO-TV) and Florence, S. D. (KDLO-TV), which carry 
all programing and announcements transmitted by the 
mother station in Sioux Falls. No other medium was used 
for the campaign. After the campaign had been underway 
a few weeks, Schuler experienced marked increases in their 
8-ounce PEP sales. Of particular importance was the fact 
that their sales curve showed increases for the smaller size 
PEP. Later in the campaign, sales for the larger 8-ounce 
bottle showed a rapid climb — evidence that viewers had 
tried the smaller size with results. Schuler had succeeded in 
placing over 3,500 bottles of PEP within the coverage area 
of KELO-TV and its two booster stations. "We must give 
credit where credit is due," said Daniels, sales manager. 

KELO-TV, Sioux Falls Announcements 



FOOD STORE 

SPONSOR: H&H Food Store AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: When B&H Food Store of Mobile 
abandoned print some three years ago because of unsatis- 
factory results, they purchased full sponsorship of Ziv's 
Highway Patrol, seen Thursdays from 8 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
on WALA-TV, Mobile, Alabama. The 24-hour seven-day-a- 
week store has renewed the show for three consecutive 
seasons. Despite the fact that a local chain store does more 
than 40% of the area's grocery volume, B&H has been able 
to boast a better than average sales volume which increases 
each succeeding year of spon.sorship. The store attributes 
the rise to the air selling of Jim McNamara, WALA-TV na- 
tional sales manager, who, they insist, must do the commer- 
cials. Client claims that when he is off-camera, sales volume 
dips. An oddity of the B&H campaign is their foregoing the 
third commercial: "In order that you may enjoy the re- 
mainder of Highway Patrol to conclusion and without in- 
terruption B&H relinquishes its commercial time." 
WALA-TV, Mol.ile Film show 



CANNED GOODS 

SPONSOR: Sam McDaniel & Sons, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Sam McDaniel & Sons, Inc. of Bed- 
ford, Va., packagers of Bunker Hill Canned Beef, had been 
struggling for months in the Norfolk market. Sales were 
low and their position was rather precarious with several 
of the wholesalers. After several unsuccessful trys in other 
media they purchased an announcement schedule on WAVY- 
TV, Norfolk, Va. The situation changed almost immediately 
after they began advertising on WAVY-TV. McDaniel's 
sales curve made a sudden surge forward and rose perpen- 
dicularly. In a four-month period the company showed an 
astonishing 1011/2% increase. Since then McDaniel's sales 
have risen at a steady pace. "Anytime your business changes 
from a shaky position to a strong competitive position, with 
a doubling of sales, there is a reason," stated J. W. Valiant 
II, sales manager for the company. "And the reason is 
television. It's still hard for me to realize how quickly 
things began to happen when television began to sell for us." 
WAVY-TV, Norfolk Announcements 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^w 





FARM FAMILY TAKES "HE 



Farm living has changed a lot out here in the Land of Milk and Money, In fact, the only 
way we know a farmer from a city-feller is that the farmer pays cash for his new car! 

Yes, here's a unique market of small cities and big dairy farms . . . 42% rural and 58% 
urban . . . more than 400,000 families enjoying Channel 2-CBS Television, 





M 



THE LAND OF MILK AND X^NEY 
WBAY, CHANNEL 2, GREEN BAY 



HAYDN R. EVANS, GEN. MGR. 



REP. WEED TELEVISION 



NEWS & IDEA 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Peter Paul returns to network 
radio next month ^^itli the largest 
saturation campaign in its history. 

To celebrate its 4()th anniversary, 
the candy compan\ ordered a 10-pro- 
gram per week participation campaign 
via Mutual as a climax to its spot tv 
and spot radio drive. 

New theme: What's the call? Peter 
Paul! Agency: D-F-S. 

Advertisers' campaigns of the 
week : 

• Mennen Co. will be going all- 
out during the month of December, 
just prior to the peak Christmas sell- 



ing period, to promote its new Gold 
Crest Toiletries line. In addition to 
jjrint, here's what the company will 
use: 

Network tv: participations on Amer- 
ican Bandstand (ABC-TV) ; Today 
(NBC-TV I and Tonight (NBC-TV) 

Network radio: CBS Weekend Plan 
and NBC's Monitor. 

• Mission Pak will make a 
quarter-million three-week saturation 
buy of tv and radio spots in the Los 
Angeles and Bay area beginning in 
mid-November. To supplement this, the 
retail chain will also use print and 
outdoor posters. Agency: Stanley 
Pflaum Associates. 

• B. T. Babbitt, Inc., which 



launched its New York City Subway- 
Soap Coupon (Buy Three-Ride Free) 
promotion a couple months ago, is in 
Albany now, with a coupon promo- 
tion in that area. Also featured are 
cash prizes awarded to listeners who 
hear their number aired on WTRY. 

• For their first organized industry 
promotion "Ice Cream for the Holi- 
day Week" kicks off the campaign 
15-21 December. Sponsored by the 
Paraffined Carton Research Coun- 
cil, the campaign is aimed at stimulat- 
ing more ice cream consumption dur- 
ing the winter. Plans include spots on 
tv and radio in top market cities. 

They'll do more advertising: 
The Isodine Pharmacal Corp., a 

division of International Latex, starts 
its 1958-59 fiscal year with increas- 
ing its advertising by 200%. Its 
major effort will continue to be in tv. 
Agency: Reach, McClinton. 

Rayco Manufacturing Co. has 
stepped up its fall advertising budget 
by 20% over last year. Its four-month 



PICTURE 
WRAP-UP 



No close shave: Charlotte, N. C. barber Nelson Snyder (c) won 
by wide margin mail contest sponsored by WSOC Radio to select 
favorite barber. WSOC personalities Bob Jones (1), Dewey Drum 
look oxer m.i.i.- of 2.300 \otes Nelv„„ ,,ullr,i „f jlmoM 7,500 ca'.t 





C. B. Akcrs (1), gen. mgi. of KVOO-TV, 
Tulsa, congratulates Okla. gubernatorial can- 
didate J. H. Edmondson (r) and Mrs. Ed- 
mondson after Democratic primary victory. 
KVOO-TV televised Edmondson's speech, 
picked up by four other Okla. tv stations 



record campaign gets underway this 
week; in radio — 2,100 one-minute 
spots a week from 77 radio stations in 
70 markets; in tv — 160 one-minute 
filmed spots a week on 53 tv stations, 
in 50 markets. Agency: Emil Mogul. 

Strictly personnel: Theodore Ro- 
senak, v.p. in charge of advertising 
for Blatz, now in the same capacity 
at Pabst; and Rocco Bunino, v.p. in 
charge of sales at Blatz, now doing 
the same at Pabst . . . Matthew Ruf- 
fle, appointed a v.p. at Hazel Bishop 
. . . Frank Barnes has joined the 
New York sales office of St. Croix 
Paper Co. . . . F. James Franklin, 
promoted to sales manager of RCA 
Whirlpool. 

AGENCIES 

The Kroger rate of agency turn- 
over continues unabated. 

Now it's Campbell-Ewald quitting its 
11.25 million share of the chain's busi- 
; it didn't pay off in profit. 



Campbell-Mithun, already in the 
Kroger fold, is to get a chunk of the 
C-E leavings. 

Agency appointments: Leo Bur- 
nett, for Allstate Insurance Co.'s new 
Hnes, including life, accident, sickness 
and hospitalization insurance . . . 
BBDO, for American-Standard Air 
Conditioning Division . . . The Zakin 
Co., for Knickerbocker Yarn Co., New 
York . . . The Art Blum p.r. and ad 
agency, retained by K Candy and 
Ice Cream Co. of Sonora . . . Koehl, 
Landis and Landan, Inc., for PGW, 
stations reps. 

Thisa and Data: Livingston and 
Associates, Chicago, is the agency on 
all Ledds Chemical Products brands, 
including M-O-Lene and Wool-0-Lene 
. . . D'Arcy is the new agency on 
Studebaker. 

At MacManus, John & Adams: 

These top level changes on the 
Pontiac and Cadillac accounts: 



Hovey Hagerman, senior v.p., be- 
comes Cadillac account supervisor 
under Charles Adams, v.p. and execu- 
tive assistant to Ernest Jones, presi- 
dent; James Graham, supervisor of 
Pontiac; Robert Field, account ex- 
ecutive on Cadillac; Colin John, ac- 
count executive on Pontiac. 

They became v.p.'s: Walter Tib- 
bals, formerly v.p. in charge of tv/ 
radio at BBDO's west coast office, 
named v.p. and general manager of 
radio/tv at Norman, Craig & Kummel 
. . . William James, elected executive 
v.p. at Paris & Peart . . . Carroll 
Grinnell, a v.p. at B&B and account 
supervisor of Gaines products. 

Chher agency personnel moves: 
John Waite, appointed v.p. and 
supervisor of cosmetic accounts at 
Lambert & Feasley, Inc . . . Francis 
Lanigan, former manager of new 
product marketing at Nestle Co., to 
B&B as a marketing executive in the 
agency's newly created Development 






To celebrate 5th anniversary of doing home- 
maker show on KOB-TV, Albuquerque, sta- 
tion gave Marge White cake at KOB-TV 
transmitter, 10,600 ft. abo\e sea level. With 
Marge: (1 to r) cameraman Budd\ (liapcl, 
dir. Harry Norviel. ptoin. mm. I . ( liii'=ti*on 





Six lo\eI> Miss Rheingold finalists gather 
in ^tudio^ of WMGM, N.Y., where they give 
station hteaks and ask for public \ote. Seated 
are Ray Kdtz. associate director of WMGM, 
Dee Grossman of client Liebmann Brew- 
e.ie*. and WMGM v.p. .\rthur M. Tolchin 

Top management of Detroit Tigers baseball 
team, along with radio/tv representatives, 
flew to Kalamazoo recently to inspect new 
home of Fetzer Broadcast Co., pay tribute to 
John E. Fetzer, pioneer broadcaster and 
board chairman of Detroit Baseball Co. 



Init . . . Daniel ti. Evans, elected 
president i)f W liitlock. Swigart & 
£vans. Inc.. New Orleans . . . Russell 
Fradkin, formerly president of Frad- 
kin Advertising. Inc.. has joined 
Kameny Associates as senior account 
supervisor and member of the plans 
board . . . Everett Sahrbeok, v. p. 
and art director at Reach. McClinton 
& Co.. named the agency's executive 
art director. 

At Bryan Houston : Peter J. Smith, 
appointed producer in the tv/radio de- 
partment; Peter Keveson, creative 



supervisor in the drug division of the 
agency; and Coral Eaton, associate 
director in charge of media analysis. 

D. M. Marshman, Jr., appointed to 
the new post of creative director at 
C. J. LaRoche . . . Baker Ostrin, 
creative director at the Los Angeles 
office of MacManus. John & Adams . . . 
Harry Kinzie, Jr., named copy chief 
of Tatham-Laird, Chicago . . . Art 
Morat, to the art staff of Grant's 
Detroit office . . . Carl Tuosto, ac- 
count executive at Davis Cummins & 




Associates, New Brunswick, N. J. . . . 
John Devaney, management super- 
visor at BBDO, Chicago . . . Barton 
West, senior art director, McCann- 
Erickson, Chicago . . . Jack Caeser, 
account executive, Hume, Smith, 
Mickelberry . . . Phillip Wenig, di- 
rector of the marketing and consumer 
research department, Harold Cabot & 
Co., Boston. 

NETWORKS 

NTA Film Network will soon put 
the SRO sign out for its Shirley 
Temple Film Festival series, to 
start in October. 

Five national advertisers have signed 
to sponsor these films: Ideal Toy Corp., 
Necchi-Elna Sales Corp., Phillips-Van 
Heusen Corp., Shwayder Bros., and the 
radio/tv division of Westinghouse 
Electric Corp. 

All are represented by Grey. 

Network Ideas at work: 

• Seeking a teen-age audience for 
promotion of its new lemon-flavored 
cough drops, Vick Chemical Co. will 
sponsor ABC-TV's American Band- 
stand. Dick Clark will spearhead the 
new promotion by doing both live and 
filmed tv commercials (via a catchy 
rock 'n roll jingle) and by tossing out 
hundreds of free samples during each 
performance. 

• Johnny Carson, quizmaster on 
ABC-TV's Who Do You Trust, is 
launching a 'Lucky 13' contest among 
promotion managers of ABC-TV sta- 
tions carrying his show to determine 
which station does the best job to 
promote the program. The total, in 
cash prizes, amounts to $5,000. 

New network affiliation: WSIL- 

TV, Harrisburg. 111., has joined the 
ranks of primary ABC-TV affiliates. 

V 

Thisa and Data: Sterling C. Quin- 
lan, ABC v.p. in charge of WBKB, 
Chicago, has authored a novel con- 
cerning the broadcasting industry — 
dubbed, The Merger. It will be pub- 
lished 16 October, by Doubleday & 
Co. 

Network personnel: William Bal- 
lard, named director of market plan- 
ning for Mutual . . . Roger Gimbel, 
named executive producer, daytime 
programs and John Greene, man- 
ager, daytime program operations: 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Jj 



NBC-TV . . . Jerome Harrison, 

manager of sales development, NBC- 
TV network sales. 

FILM 

CNP's first-run documentary- 
drama, Danger is My Business, has 
been sold in 85 markets to date. 

Advertisers buying the series in- 
clude Kroger Co.; Boise Cascade 
Lumber Co. (four Idaho markets); 
First Federal Savings And Loan 
Association, Miami; Old Kent 
Bank & Trust, Grand Rapids; First 
Federal Savings and Loan, Pitts- 
burg, Kan.; Sealtest Dairy & 
Grocers, Indianapolis; Cincinnati 
Gas & Electric; Honey Krust 
Bread, Louisville; Carothers Sheet 
Metal Co., Euguene; Exercycle, New 
Mexico. 

Station buyers include WRCV, 
Philadelphia; WJZ-TV, Baltimore; 
KCOP, Los Angeles; WSM, Nash- 
ville; KING-TV, Seattle; KPTV, 
Portland; KTVT, Salt Lake City; 
KHQ, Spokane; WEHT, Evansville; 
and WNTA, New York. 



Other Sales: 

• Kitchen Fresh Potato Chips 

has purchased Lakeside TV's Toma- 
liawk for three west coast markets: 
San Francisco, Los Angeles and San 
Diego. 

Sales meetings: Key executives of 
Guild Films were granted stock op- 
tions this week at the company's an- 
nual fall sales meeting. 

Fall distribution of Curtain Time 
(oif -net work Telephone Time re-runs) 
and Spunky and Tadpole cartoons 
was also planned. 

NTA set up a new division this week 
to handle merchandising and manu- 
facturer's licenses for its syndicated 
and network programs. 

Named to head the division: Irving 
Lichtenstein, in New York, and Al 
Stern, on the west coast. 

Strictly personnel: Anthony Tor- 
regrossa, former assistant sales serv- 
ice manager at Ziv, named sales serv- 
ice manager of Jack Wrather's new 



ITC . . . Herbert R. Pierson to 

Reub Kaufman's Jayark Films. The 
two had worked together at Guild . . . 
William M. Koblenzer appointed to 
the newly-created post of New York 
program sales director at NTA. 

Andrew Jaegar named eastern 
sales manager of the newly-created 
regional division at Ziv . . . Richard 
C. Polister to Continental Films as 
general manager . . . Victor Peck 
appointed midwestern sales manager. 
Regis Films . . . Michael J. Gould, 
to Guild, as sales rep . . . John Orr, 
appointed production manager, 
Klaeger Film. 

RADIO STATIONS 

What do folks want to hear, news 
and feature-wise, on their local 
radio stations? 

This is the gist of a survey con- 
ducted by the Major Market Group 
ownership— stations KFOX, Long 
Beach, serving the Los Angeles mar- 
ket and KIMD, Independence, serving 
the Kansas City market. 

The answer this radio station found: 



Iff llll I ^ ^ II 

^IB^^^^ ^^K^ O^^ ^^^ ^^^P 1^^?' S^^ 

£iadA Ut Fneovui 



SiUxdA Ul IrOA^^t pAOgA/)lVVUV -KAAJTVs full time 

farm editor has all the facilities of the Agricultural Department 
of the McClatchy Broadcastir^g Company at his disposal. He also works 
with McClatchy newspaper farm editors. This, coordinated 
with on-the-spot film coverage, results in farm programming 
without peer in Fresno. 
KMJ-TV . FRESNO. CALIFORNIA . McClatchy Broadcasting Company . The Katz Agency, National Representative 




6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^^. 



wow: WHAT A FIRST YEAR 

THAiVKS A MILLION FOLKS 

'Jaxic" and WFGA-TV have enjoyed 
one year of steadily growing popularity 
down in Jacksonville — focal point of a 
$11/2 billion 64-county Florida-Georgia 
area. During the year, the station won 
national honors in Two Station Markets, 
winning 2nd place for Cleneral Audience 
i Promotion and 2nd place in Sales Pro- 
motion in the Television Age-Billboard 
promotion (ompetition. 

We want to express our appreciation to 
our good friends and patrons, the agenqr 
people and time buyers throughout the 
country. 

"Jaxie" the porpoise with a purpose, is 
beginning his second year with the same 
avowed aim — to provide top-flight pro- 
gramming! . . . excellent promotioni . . . 
hard-hitting merchandising! 




Basic ISBC Affiliate, plus 
selected ABC Programmir 

Represented by Peters, Griffi 
Woodicard, Inc. 



WP^lk TV Channel 12 

WWr^lM" I ¥ Jacksonville, Florida 

FLORIDA'S COLORFUL STATION 



In the Syracuse Market 

WSYR's COVERAGE 

EQUALS THAT OF 

NEXT TWO STATIONS"^ 

The amazing coverage superiority of WSYR is 
illustrated by these facts: 

• It reaches 80% more homes than the No. 2 
station in Syracuse. 

• Its weekly circulation is as great as that of 
stations 2 and 3 combined ! 

That's probably because WSYR attracts the adull, 
able-to-buy audience by high quality programming 
in all major areas of entertainment and public 
service. 

NSC in Central New York 

uf c Y P -' 

^^V^^V ^^^V ^H ^^^^^ HENRY I. CHRIS 

5 KW • SYRACUSE, M. Y. • 570 KC 



People are interested in news about 
tv! 

And so, in line with its policy of 
giving the people what they want, 
both stations now carry two-minute 
summaries a couple times a day, high- 
lighting the important evening tv 
shows in their markets. 

Now it's the stereophonic spectac- 
ular: WDSU, New Orleans, will hold 
a series of "spectaculars" designed to 
acquaint the public with the advantages 
of stereophonic transmission. 

These series will use the stereo- 
phonic facilities of both its am and 
fm stations, and will originate from a 
local music shop, on South Claiborne 
Avenue. 

FM note: KYW-FM, Cleveland, 
which began separate programing op- 
erations 1 August, has rejected all 
commercial sales until "we are sure 
we can deliver an audience to our- 
selves and our clients," declared Hol- 
land Tooke, Cleveland v.p. for the 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. 

Sports buy: In what it considered 
"the largest sports buy in the history 
of New York radio by a sponsor in 
volume of hours and dollars," Bud- 
weiser Beer will sponsor all games 
played by the N.Y. Rangers and N.Y. 
Knicks — to be aired via WINS. 

Station sale: KOMA, Oklahoma 
City, becomes another Storz station, 
purchased for $600,000 from Myer 
Feldman, investor, and other associ- 
ates. 

Ideas at work: 

• WHOP, Hopkinsville, Ky., which 
usually airs from 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 
p.m., last week remained on the air 
around-the-clock for its "one-hundred- 
hour safety marathon" to cut down ac- 
cidents during Labor Day weekend. In 
addition, its mobile news station wag- 
ons patrolled the highways, selecting 
the safe-driver of the hour. 

• In line with its constant program 
for promotion of Indiana's Litterbug 
campaign, WOWO, Ft. Wayne, hand- 
ed out thousands of "Litter-Bags" from 
a special Hospitality Tent set up dur- 
ing the reunion of the "Old Time 
Threshers and Saw Mill Operators" in 
the city. 

• Last spring, deejays of KING, 
Seattle, planted a garden using the 



76 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




The SELLibrated (and only full 
powered) station in the 

GOLDEN VALLEY 

(Central Ohio) 

WHTN 
TV 



n Edward Pelry Co., 



.ASHINGTON 



POPULATION: 439,000* 

EFFECTIVE BUYING 
INCOME: $748,540,000* 

A distinct and separate market from Seattle's 
coastal region, and Spokane's Inland Empire. 

INLAND WASHINGTON 



KPQ 




KPQ 



WENATCHEE 

WASHINGTON 

5000 W- 560 KC 



farm tools from a CARE package. This 
week, to demonstrate just how impor- 
tant these farm tools are, d.j. Frosty 
Fowler and his family are living off 
the produce of this garden, supple- 
mented by a CARE food package. 

Thisa and Data: KOWH, Omaha, 
has been elected to membership in the 
Nebraska Home Town Radio group 
. . . National spot advertising on 
WBT, Charlotte, has increased by 
16% during July, compared to July, 
1957. 

TV STATIONS 

Harold F. Ritchie has bought into 
ABC-TV's 77 Sunset Strip and 
Cheyenne for the 1958-59 season. 
K&E is the agency. 

That makes Sunset a sell-out. 

Sports buy: The Los Angeles Rams- 
Chicago Cardinal football game today 
(6 September) via KHJ-TV, Los An- 
geles, will be sponsored by Falstaff and 
Volkswagen. 

Speaking of sports. Buddy Blattner 
conducted a baseball clinic for the Lit- 
tle Leaguers of Lincoln, Neb., at 
KOLN-TV's sports field. One hour 
of this clinic was telecast. 

Call letter change: KCJB-TV, Minot, 
N. D., becomes KXMC-TV this week, 
due to its purchase by the North Da- 
kota Broadcasting Co., Inc. 

Ideas at work: 

• Climaxing a week-long promotion 
of Stage 12, WBOY-TV, Clarksburg, 
W. Va., staged a parachute drop over 
central W. Va., announcing the pre- 
miere of first-run movies on the sta- 
tion. Attached to the more than 300 
parachutes, was a season's pass, good 
for viewing these movies. 

Anniversary: WGEM-TV, Quincy, 
111., celebrates its fifth year of continu- 
ous telecasting this week. 

News on the personnel front : Ray 
Hubbard, appointed program man- 
ager of KPIX, San Francisco . . . 
Roger Read, named general man- 
ager, WKRC-TV, Cincinnati . . . 
James White, sales manager, WJRT, 
Flint, Mich . . . Nicholas Pitasi, sales 
account executive, WABC-TV, New 
York . . . George Facchin, account 
executive, KMOX-TV, St. Louis. ^ 



I DONT WANT 
JUST A JOB! 

... I want a "position" as a 
Promotion Executive. 

Heavy Radio-TV experience 
ranging from Local to Nation- 
al Sales Development, Adver- 
tising, Promotion, Merchan- 
dising and Exploitation in Net- 
work Radio, Local & Network 
TV, Film Syndication and Ad 
Agency business. 

Currently in NYC, but willing 
to make move for long range 
opportunity. 

Excellent references. 

For details contact 

Box 21 

SPONSOR 



RESULT- 
GETTERS 

NOT 

CLAIM -JUMPERS 
BUY 



1020 KC 
THE POPULAR STATION 



5,000 watts Los Angeles 



Represented by: 
BROADCAST TIME SALES 

New York Chicago Detroit San Franci 

DORA-CLAYTON 

Atlanta 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



DIXIE CUP 

(Cont'd from page 42) 
agency. Hicks i Greist. whose vice 
president and director of radio and 
tv. Ted Grunewald. suggested a new 
approach to buying tv. 

The new approach called for an 
adaptation of the standard contiguous 
rate structure. Rather than the tradi- 
tional application of the discount prin- 
ciple (to large advertisers who used 
52-week schedules I , a plan was worked 
out so that the buying could be lumped 
within a single month, yet still qualify 



on volume for the discount rates. The 
result was a two-fold gain: the com- 
pany derived tremendous impact and 
created a dramatic promotion by vir- 
tue of the saturation, yet achieved it all 
within a tight springtime budget. 

The second problem — sales strategy 
— came down to what to say, and how 
to say it. The answer to this came out 
of a test print campaign the company 
had run some time earlier. 

The theme was based on the idea 
that a cup dispenser in the bathroom 
would eliminate the unsanitarv bath- 




See PETERSGRIFFIN-WOODWARD, INC. 



room drinking glass. The problem was 
how to translate the idea to tv. 

There was an additional complica- 
tion: the fact that several programs 
were being used meant various time 
segments, range of audiences and 
widely divergent characteristics and 
personalities of the 13 shows. 

The agency solved this by preparing 
special scripts for each show, tailored 
to the delivery, audience loyalties and 
patter of each performer. 

The only unsolved problem remain- 
ing was that of continuity throughout 
the promotion. The agency inclined 
toward an animated film, but realized 
the difficulties it would entail. 

The solution came with the develop- 
ment of a germ with a tough-guy ac- 
cent. The "joim" was a clearly-defined 
villain, the kind viewers actually want 
to see foiled, but was also prototype 
enough not to make the skin crawl. 
What emerged was a dastardly villain 
who makes his home on "dat bat 'room 
glass dat everybody uses." 

The written commercial scripts and 
the animated film were used evenly 
over the 36 commercial minutes — 18 
times each. Since there were 13 shows 
this meant that each show had at least 
one of each, giving the campaign the 
benefits of both the personal perform- 
er touch, and the continuity theme. 

Was the campaign successful? "The 
campaign scored on two counts," re- 
ports James W. Stitt, Dixie's ad mana- 
ger. "The tv personalities selling 
Dixie home dispensers brought people 
into stores to buy. At the same time 
the idea was a 'first,' so we got favor- 
able dealer reaction on our astuteness. 
What more could we ask for?" 

This year's campaign was a continu- 
ation of Dixie's policy of using a 
healthy portion of its advertising for 
air media. It was not always so. Prior 
to 1954, the company used print exclu- 
sively, but that year it began explor- 
ing tv tentatively, via local participa- 
tions in selected markets. 

By last year more than 50*^^ of the 
budget was going into air, a situation 
that could well continue, based on the 
success of the current eflFort. Says Russ 
Wood, Dixie's sales director, home 
products division: "Air media works. 
We've proved this to our own satis- 
faction. Not only can tv be merchan- 
dised to the trade, but we've learned 
that chain store buyers expect a com- 
pany with the stature and reputation 
of Dixie to use the medium." ^ 



6 SEPTEMBER 195o 




7-COUNTY PULSE REPORT 1 




SHARE OF AUDIENCE — MONDAY-FRIDAY B 


6 A.M.- 12 NOON 


WKZO 


SfaHon "B" 


Station "C" SI 


32 


22 


'' 1 


12 NOON -6 P.M. 


29 


22 


^' 1 


6 P.M. -12 MIDNIGHT 


30 


20 


-LJ 



BUT.. .WKZO Radio Touches All the 
Bases for You in Kalamazoo- 
Battle Creek and Greater 
Western Michigan! 

It takes just one big swing, the swing to WKZO Radio, 
to make many thousands of hits, every day, in Kalamazoo- 
Battle Creek and Greater Western Michigan. 
In fact, WKZO averages over 32% of the total audi- 
ence "hits" each day (Mon.-Fri.) from 6:00 a.m. to 
12 noon or a tremendous 48% more than the second- 
place station! 
Let Avery-Knodel tell you more about WKZO Radio. 




WKZO 

CBS RADIO FOR KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
AND GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery-Knode/, Inc., Exclusive National RepresenfaUves 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Paydirt in 
Piedmont 




S.Midiiiilod sho«s sold 
this summer: 

WHIRLYBIRDS 

TARGET 

FOLLOW THAT MAN 

DIAL 999 

UNION PACIFIC 

DECOY 

IF YOl' HAD A MILLION 

Check and buy 

WSOC-TY 

Charlotte, N. C. 

H-R Reps Nationally 
F-J Reps Atlanta 



Programmed 
for the housewife 
. . . the buyer 
for the family 



WISH 

Indianapolis 



CBS 



RepresentfJ h) Bf.lling 




A CORINTHIAN STATION 

KOTV Tulsa . KGCI.-TV Houston 
WANi; & WANIMV Tort Wayne 
WISH & WISH-TV Indianapolis 



VIDEOTAPE 

^Cont'd from pa^c 31) 

Not oiiK has tape touched off juris- 
dictional problems in actors' unions 
but it has also run into similar ques- 
tions among technical unions. James 
Higson, program director of KHJ-TV. 
Los Angeles, in charge of Don Lee 
Videotape Recording Service, suggests 
the following steps to establish a prece- 
dent with regard to tapes made bv 
crew of one union, played back by 
another: 

While a network could not contract 
directly for such a tape, an agency 
could. Once made, the tape would be 
handed to the agency. The agency 
would take it to the network with the 
opposite union. Thus the tape would 
have the status of any custom work — 
or of a film made in an lATSE shop 
played back on tv by NABET or IBEW. 

Higson admits direct feed might be 
impossible but that the method has 
precedent and should be tested for tape 
as "a counter-part of film production." 

As for the tv film production indus- 
try with its tremendous investment in 
camera and lab equipment (not to 
mention the fact that in New York 
alone it draws from $30 to $50 mil- 
lion annually in commercial produc- 
tion) a lot of dust has been kicked in 
the face of videotape. Understandably, 
no producer wants to throw his film 
equipment into the garbage can. On 
one hand, they are suspicious of tape 
and its implications. On another, 
they are suspicious of what networks 
and stations may do to undermine 
their position in the tv commercial in- 
dustry. On still another they are sus- 
picious of the tape equipment manu- 
facturers. How torn up they are is 
apparent in the recent pilgrimage of 
the Film Producers Association to 
Washington to protect themselves 
against network-and-tape invasion of 
their domain. 

One of the things that has disturbed 
some is the entrance of Ampex, on a 
minority-interest basis, in the field of 
commercial production with Howard 
Meighan's new Videotape Productions. 

Says Martin Ransohoff, president of 
Filmways, "It would seem to us that 
Ampex might have thought more of 
the long pull for the entire industry 
and, rather than invest in its own pro- 
duction company, put more money into 
facilities, parts depots and service per- 
sonnel for maintenance; in short, worry 
about their customers' future instead 



of going into competition with them." 
While not exactly ecstatic about 
Ampex's entrance in the commercial 
production field, he is fair in his evalu- 
ation of tape advantages. "With video- 
tape, you can do just about anything 
short of animation (stop motion)," he 
points out. "Tape can handle almost 
any optical — wipe, mat, dissolve; what 
can be done live with tv cameras can 
be caught on tape." 

He does point out one thing, often 
overlooked — that spot tv will probably 
be the last to feel the effect of tape on 
a national advertiser leveL "The key 
to the whole thing," Ransohoff says, 
"is the stations. Before tape becomes 
practical for spot commercials (as film 
now is) it will need 85 to 90% na- 
tional market coverage. Only then will 
it become valuable as a spot tool. It 
could cut up to 20% off commercial 
costs then. But now it is not practical 
in a spot campaign. One of the big 
problems spot must face before tape 
becomes practical is that of traffic. 
However, when the stations are ready, 
we'll be ready." 

Fortunately, for the industry, the 
stations are getting ready. Videotape is 
already a reality. Tomorrow it promises 
to be an all-engulfing one. ^ 




SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Here is hew 

WSB Radie and WSB-TV deminate 

their fields in Atlanta 




■■■■■■s^r:^'" 



Metropolitan Atlanta 
I Leadership in Radio Audience Ratings | 



Sumiay thru Saturday—- 504 Quorter-Nours 
Ni«lsen-March/ April 1958 

(There are 14 radio stotions 
in the metropolitan area) 



B%1 



20.8% 

I 



9.1% 



H ^ 27% 




3Si 



Metropolitan Atlanta 

Leadership in 

Television Audience Ratings 

Sunday thru Saturday, May S/H — ARB , 

454 quarter-hours (all three^ stations on 

the oir). Ties were counted as "firsts" 

for each station involved. 




WSB 2n(ISta. 3rd Sta. 4th Sta. 5th Sta. 



An advertiser's choice of stations in Atlanta can make a sizable dif- 
ference in his sales results. These charts show why. In few cities of the 
nation do you see so marked a degree of consumer preference. This massive 
preference for WSB Radio and WSB Television is built on a record of 
superior local programming, better news service and staff work of high 
professional quality. Certainly your advertising in Atlanta belongs on 
the WSB stations. 

>A/SB RADIO /^A/SB-TV 

Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. NBC 
Represented by Edward Petry & Company 



6 SEPTEMBER 1958 




and corr 
KOSI a 
Denver 


IMPACT in programming 
mercial presentation assures 
dvertisers a "cosy lead" in 


Every' da 
tuning tc 
features 

to your 
dynamic 
radio sta 


V more and more families are 
KOSI for music, news, and 

with universal appeal. Talk 

Petrv Man about the most 
selling force in Denver- 

tion KOSI! 



KOSI 



5000 Watts 
Denver is 

KOSI-land! 



Give a "whistle" for your Retry Man 



MId-AmerIca Broadcasting Co. 



ll 



MORE 

radio homes at the 

LOWEST 

cost per home 
of any station in the 

Heart of Florida 




24-hour service /o fhe Suncoast 

WSUN Radio 

St. Petersburg-Tampa 

Represented by VENARD, RINTOUL & 

McCONNELL 

Southeastern: (AMES S. AYERS 





Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



John E. McMillin who, with this issue 
takes over as sponsor's Executive Editor, 
has a 20-year background of top-level 
agency experience, particularly in air me- 
dia. A former creative head and director 
at Compton, he has served as radio/tv v.p. 
at Compton and Hutchins, has worked as 
an account executive at Maxon and Cecil 
& Presbrey, and has developed copy and 
advertising plans for more than 2.5 major national accounts includ- 
ing P&G with whom he worked closely for 15 years. A writer by 
trade, interest and enthusiasm, his Commercial Commentary column 
in SPONSOR has attracted much industry comment in recent weeks. 
He is married, father of two sons, and a graduate of Yale. 



Walter Craig, v.p. in charge of radio/tv 

for Norman. Craig & Kummel, Inc., has 

been elected to the board of directors. 

Formerly vice president in charge of radio 

and television and a member of the board 

of directors of Benton & Bowles, Craig is 

completing his fourth year with Norman, 

Oaig &. Kummel. He joined the then newly 

reorganized company in January 1955 to 

develop their radio and television department. Notable among his 

successes in this capacity have been his purchase and development of 

$64,000 Question and The Price Is Right. His appointment to the 

NC&K board points up the new and more important role he will 

assijint' as his activities broaden to include marketing, planning and 

advertising. Craig is a member of the agency's executive committee. 



^*«j|^ " Frank E. Pellegrin was elected president 

^^^^^^\ "f 'he Broadcast Pioneers after a nation- 

^ ^^ ' wide balloting of all members. Pellegrin, 

, '^ ^ vice president and partner of H-R Televi- 

^^ ||L^>«-^!iSj, sion. Inc. and H-R Representatives, Inc. 

^H^HmI^. I^^^ j^ggj^ active in radio/tv management, 

^^B /ftil^^^^^^ sales, promotion and public relations for 

W/^'/MmK/^^ ^he past 23 years. In 1947, he established 
WATO. the first radio station in Oak 
Ridge, Tenn.: and in 1948 built and managed KSTL, St. Louis, Mo. 
Pellegrin served as president of the New York chapter of The Broad- 
cast Pioneers from 1955-56, and was elected first vice president of 
the national organization in 1956-57. A frequent speaker before 
broadcast groups, he has authored two books on time sales. 




SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 1958 



IT 
OEPENDSi 







PROSPECTS' 
DOOR 



\ 



If you want to open more doors and close more sales, 

it's sound practice to "knock" over KFMB in the 

highly reliable company of such welcome 

newsmen as Edward R. Murrow, Eric Sev- 

areid, Lowell Thomas and Walter Cronkite. 

They have access to some 301,000 San Diego 

County homes (plus thousands more in five 

additional Southern California Counties) 

and will help add deep conviction to 

your message. And they're backed up 

by a whole corps of local reporters who 

get an equally warm reception. 'With 

"} news reaching such new peaks of interest 

r the San Diego CBS radio station has one 

of the strongest selling voices in America. 

In San Diego KFMB IS CBS. FIRST ON 

MORE LZ5TENING THAN ANY OTHER 

SAN DIEGO RADIO STATION 




KFMB 

CBS FOR SAN DIEGO 

epresented by 

Edward Petty & Co., Inc. 



SPONSOR 
^ SPEAKS 

Simplify your rate card 

In this issue (page 40) sponsor reports the recommenda- 
tions of station representative Richard O'Connell for "stream- 
lining" station rate cards. 

The most significant part of this story is not the details of 
the O'Connell proposals. 

Some station men and representatives can advance sound 
reasons why the frequency discount should not be dropped 
outright by all stations in all broadcasting areas. 

But what should impress station managers and representa- 
tives alike is the enthusiasm with which hard-worked agency 
timebuyers have greeted the idea that their back-breaking 
load of paper work and calculations might someday be 
lightened, 

SPONSOR is particularly close to timebuyers and time- 
buyer problems, sponsor knows that rate card complexi- 
ties, especially in the radio field, are causing agencies need- 
less and wearisome problems in handling spot business. 

This in itself is an unhealthy situation. Spot radio and 
spot tv are far too important advertising media to be tagged 
with the stigma of "handling headaches" by those who recom- 
mend and buy them. 

Beyond that there is no question that many stations, often 
without realizing it, are unnecesarily adding to their billing 
and accounting expenses by maintaining complex, outmoded 
rate card structures. 

sponsor strongly backs the efforts of SRA and individual 
representatives to simplify rate cards. Responsibility for 
action, however, rests squarely on the shoulders of the sta- 
tion operator. We urge an immediate review of your rate 
card provisions, with an eye to eliminating all outmoded 
classifications. 






THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Better understanding 
Ix'tnccn those who buy and those who sell air 
media. Greater knowledge of one another's 
problems will bring the industry greater volume 
and more effective radio/tv advertising. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Ego-softener: An agencyman passed 
along to us a prospectus from a mu- 
tual fund investing company with a 
covering letter that began: "Are you 
a participating capitalist or are you 
just salaried by those who are? 

Apt: Over the Labor Day weekend, 
WAKE, Atlanta, scheduled 496 an 
nouncements as follows: "WAKE to 
walk Tuesday, 2 September. Drive as 
though your life depends on it." 

Mirror, Mirror on the wall: A 

source sworn to secrecy reports the 
following: At a recent concept meet- 
ing at CBS TV for a beauty product 
commercial, the account executive 
said, "In this new commercial we'll 
use a mirror so the woman at home 
can see herself as she — " He stopped 
short when he noticed the others 
around the table were staring at him. 

Army game: Clayt Staley, salesman 
for WPEN, Philadelphia, is intelli- 
gence officer for the 114th Armored 
Infantry Battallion, 50th Armored Di- 
vision, N. J. National Guard. With his 
outfit at Camp Drum, and being an 
enterprising young man, Clayt figured 
out a way to make a couple of extra 
bucks on maneuvers. In the nearby 
town there were two cafes. Clayt's 
idea: "Let's sell Class A time on the 
command network and Class B time on 
the individual battalion networks to 
these restaurants." Clayt reasoned that 
since all the fellows had field radios, 
the restaurants would have a captive 
audience. But like the "best laid plans 
of mice and men," Clayt's plan fell 
through. The Battalion Commander 
vetoed it. 

Late date— by Phyllis Barlow— 
The horror movies on tv 
Though advertised as creepy 
Come on at such an hour that 
They simply make me sleepy. 

Nom de plume: On Madison Avenue 
we heard of a messenger service that 
recently forgot to pick up a package. 
The name of the service: "Accurate." 

Thorough: A sharp-eyed reader of 
RAB's second quarter spot report 
noticed that in one case it listed seven 
10-second announcements over a 10- 
Aveek period, remarked, "Is this sub- 
liminal?" 



SPONSOR • 6 SEPTEMBER 19.S8 



ATTENTIVE 



■that's what you get on WFAA RADIO! Here's a real oasis for the advertiser tired of the "ex- 
posure" type audience requiring 3 or 5 times the spots to do the selling job one spot should do! 

^eople dial WFAA to hear farm news ... to hear drama and comedy ... to hear authentic news 
lappenings ... to hear something musically different. These are the "attentive" ears — and there 
are more tuned to WFAA-820* than to any other station in Texas, according to A. C. Nielsen! 



^ 



the stations wltli ''variety ■p3?og*x*ainLixiiiig" 



WFAA 

820 • 570 



Radio Services of 
The Dallas Morning News 
, Edward Retry & Co., Nat' I. Reps. 



out of 

10 

top 
rated 
half- 
hour 
syndicated 
film 
series 



week 
after 



•■ TV : 



A very moving ))irtiin\ indeed! 
Now is the time to put 
YOUH accounts that sell 

their products throu<Jiout 

KERO-TV BAKERSFIELD SERVING MORE THAN ONE MILLION PROSPEROUS PEC 




ATIUNAL B«UAOCASTING COMPANY, iHt 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
,0 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, M. Y. 



23 SEPTSMBER 1958 
20( a copy • S3 a year 



IM30R 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DENVER 

TIED FOR FIRST PLACE 
ALL DAY -JULY PULSE 

• • • • 

17 County Area Pulse - July 
vr firsts than 
. „ _ jner siaiion, 6 AM to 6 PM 

• Morning - 3 Points out of 1 st 
•AFTERNOON - 1st PLACE 

• Evening - 2nd Place 

• • • • 
HOOPER-July-Auglst ALL DAY 

lam Young or e' 
il Manager Chicij 



^ 



MAH 

SOLID NO. 1 

Morning - Afternoon - Evening 

• • • • 

• PULSE - June - Mon thru Sat 
tl-;: 1st Place -30.5 share 

• • • • 

• HOOPER-June-July 43.5 share 

Dominant First ALL DAY 
See Avery-Knodel or Station 
ler James H. Schoonover 



I RESULTS ARE A MUST, SO ARE . . . 

it Mt stations 

1 DON W. BURDEN— Presidenf 



NEW LIGHT ON 
NET RADIO'S 
TOUGH HGHT 

New programing strat- 
egy and hard selling 
have pushed net radio 
figures for '58 close to 
1957's $66 million. 
Here's the rundown 
for the fourth quarter 

Page 33 



Bob Eastman's 
road map for time* 
buyers, sellers 

Page 36 

SPECIAL REPORT: 
Wsrevotationary 
videotape-Part 

Page 40 

ARPs new study 
on t¥ sets, 
eounty-by-0ounty 

Page 47 




YOU'LL HAVE THE AUDIENCE... 



There's an audience waiting to jack up the time-period 
that's proving to be your trouble spot. Here's the show 
that does that job- fast ! 

Why does "Public Defender" build solid audiences — 
fast ? These are the reasons : 

• It's loaded with sleuthing suspense and terrific 
excitement, yet . . . 

* It's a family-type show, with no gore and no bodies, 
and . . . 



• The star. Reed Hadley, has tremendous popularity 

with women. In addition . . . 
if It's a big-budget, carefully made, quality show. 

An audience pleaser-both sexes, all ages, and right for 
stripping. Any or all of the 69 segments of "Public 
Defender" will do a bang-up job for you . . . morning, noon, 
or night! To tighten up your programming right now 



Call your Interstate Television representative 



REED 

HADLEY 

as the 



m PUBUC DEFENDER 



NEW YORK, N. Y., 445 Park Avenue, MUrray Hill 8-2545 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 260 Kearny Street 

CHICAGO, ILL., Allied Artists Pictures Inc., 1250 S. Wabash Avenue 

DALLAS, TEXAS, 2204-06 Commerce St. 

GREENSBORO, N. C, 3207 Friendly Road 

TORONTO, CANADA, Sterling Films Ltd., King Edward Hotel 



n 



L Television 

^ ^^" ^ CORPORATION 



Now- Proved by New Depth Study 

KRNT RADI® 

Is -far and away -THE MOST 

BELIEVABLE 

STATION IN 

DES MOINES. IOWA 



MORE LISTENERS, TOO! 



This Central Surveys study reveals 
many interesting facts that show 
without question KRNT Is the sta- 
tion to use to get the kind of results 
an advertiser must get these days. 



Central Surveys has been engaged in 
nation-wide market research and public 
opinion surveys for over 20 years. 
Among the more than 200 clients ore 
many PUBLIC UTILITY companies. List 
shown on request. 



FACTS-FINDING EXAMPLES 

"// you heard conflicfing accounts of the same 
incidenf on different radio stations, which 
station would you believe?" 

KRNT 52% 

No. 2 STA 18% 

No. 3 STA 17% 

Personalities Preference 

• 2/3 name KRNT personalities. 

• 40% name KRNT personalities 
EXCLUSIVELY. 

• Re: Sta. 2 & 3. NO personalities named 
by 72% and 90%, respectively. 



KATZ has the NEW - the TRUE - facts on Des Moines Radio Listening! 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



13 September 19S8 • Jol. 12, No. :17 

3RONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE Tv/rADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

New developments in network radio 

33 Rfboundinjj sharply after a summer slump, radio networks expect strong 
4th quarter to push 1958 total close to 1957's healthy $60 million 

Fifteen ways to help timebuyers 

36 Station Representative Robert E. Eas 
for improvin;: timrlmyer-timeseller rela 

Play-Doh: $3,000,000 spot tv wonder 

39 How 27-year-old President McVicker used tv to build sales of children's 
modeling material from $25,000 to |3 million in less than 4 years 

Tv's revolutionary videotape 

40 Part II of this special report on the tai)e that is changing in industry 
reveals ihi- very latest developments along with the way stations use it 

Selling the premium product with radio 

43 H.,VN Maola Milk & Ice Cream Co. of New Bern, N. C. facing problems 
riinilar to those faced by other mid-size accounts, solved them with radio 



Norman R. Glenn 
Secreta ry-Trea su rer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMEN 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

IManagins Editor 

Akin W. Outcalt 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffa 

Senior Editor 



isociate Editor 

is Carpenter 



Western Editor (Los.Angele 

Pete Rankin 
Film Editor 
Beth Drexler Brod 
Assistant Editors 

icit Lindrup 



Glori, 



Florowiti 



Box score of network specials, 1958-59 

44 Thi~ s.'aM.nV M.1,1 specials fall below last year's, but still amount t„ 
S29.1 million. Chart listing these specials, with prices and network 

The current supply of features: How long will it last? 

44 Nc« ^ork. the country's No. 1 marketplace for feature films, has 
stf.cked all that's available. A report on the status of its seven stations 

Tv set count for 3,070 U. S. counties 

47 ^I'MNsoFi lists 11 pages of county-by-county figures from new, industry- 
hnanc.-d study, just released by Advertising Research Foundation 

SPONSOR ASKS: Should stations under joint ownership 
(am & tv) cross-plug? 

72 ^''"li th<- increasing need for program promotion, three station men 
diMuss the pros and cons of cross-plugging their radio and tv outlets 



FEATURES 

26 Commercial Commentary 

S7 Film-Scope 

lO 49th and .Vladison 

SB Marketing Week 

76 New. & Mea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

76 Picture Wrap-Up 

90 .s,,on-or Hears 



17 



Speaks 



»B Sponsor 

74 Spot Buys 

98 Ten-Second Spot; 

22 Timebuyers at W 

96 Tv and Radio N. 

89 Washington We<-] 



Production IManager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

Administrative Staff 

Dorris Bowers 

George Becker 

Jessie Ritter 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
ErTiily Cutillo 
Harry B. Fleischman 
Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



rnsEi 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
'-- - ' Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
n) nIw " - ■ 



phon 



- Madison) Nfew York 17, N. Y. Tele 
Murray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 



612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperloi 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birr,....s....... 

Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore 11. 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St. 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 
2nd class matter on 29 (anuary 1948 at the Balti- 
more postofflce under the Act of 3 March 1879 

(!) 1958 Sponsor Publications, Inc. 



Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island, Illinois 

47th TV MARKET IN THE U.S. 



As Reported in TELEVISION AGE, May 19, 1958 

41 Albany Schenectady-Troy 46 Omaha 

42 Nashville 

43 Champaign 

44 Miami 

45 Sacramento-Stockton 



47 Davenport-Rock Island 



48 Binghamton 

49 Raleigh-Durham 

50 Asheville 




48 


COUNTIES 


Population* 




1,727,100 


Homes 




556,500 


TV Homes 




469,890 


Farm Homes** 




97,101 


TV Farm Homes** 


54,912 


Effective Buying 


Income* 


$2,852,363,000 


Retail Sales* 




$2,076,120,000 





WOC-TV Davenport, Iowa is part of Central Broadcasting Company which 
also owns and operates WHO-TV and WHO-Radio — Des Moines. 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



i 



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> MIAMI TORONTO 



PORTLAND 

OREGON 



KING SIZED 
AREA 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Last week a one-time reporter for AP and the Chicago Ameri- 
can stepped into the top executive spot in coiintry^s sixth 
largest advertising agency. Like ISorman H. Strouse, president 
of J. Walter Thompson /le's Detroit-trained, and has some 
strong convictions about the need for '"''greater creativity'''' in 
the planning, buying and use of air media., particularly tv. 

The neiVSm3ker: Paul Foley, recently appointed Chairman 
of the Administrative Council for McCann Erickson's home office 
operation in New York. He'll supervise 1200 McCann employees 
in what, on its own, is America's No. 6 agency with billings of S105 
million out of McCann's total $250 million. He is the first full-tipie 
administrative chairman McCann has had for its New York setup. 

Interviewed by sponsor last week in Detroit, where he was con- 
ferring with Buick officials, Foley had this to say about his air media 
convictions: "I believe advertisers must learn to use tv more creatively 
than many are doing at present. 
The medium is too expensive to be 
bought on just a numbers basis. 
We've got to search for more crea- 
tiveness — not just in commercials 
— but in the programs we buy, tlu- 
schedules we use, the images \\c 
build, and the way we merchandise 
the whole tv package." 

Foley went on to say that, in his 
opinion, this need for increased 
creativity in tv thinking is not con- 
fined solely to advertisers of dur- 
able goods, but applies also to 
many soft goods manufacturers. 

Until last February senior v.p. in charge of McCann's Detroit 
office, Foley is given a large share of the credit for bringing the 
Buick account to the agency in the big GM-Chrysler shift last winter. 
Previous to joining McCann three years ago, he was executive v.p. at 
MacManus, John and Adams, Inc., Detroit, with whom he was 
associated for 10 years. His early training was as a newspaper man 
and foreign correspondent. 

As Chairman of the Administrative Council of McCann's New York 
office at 48.5 Lexington Avenue, he'll be ranking and full-time officer 
of a group of division heads who meet daily to discuss, plan, and 
coordinate the agency's operation. 

One phase of Foley's appointment which has stirred considerable 
interest in industry circles is the fact that his agency experience is 
heavily on the creative side. Ordinarily executive spots of this sort 
are filled by account or management men. Foley's creative back- 
ground may have long-range significance for McCann's air media 
activities. ^^ 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




ml Foley 



I REMENDOUS TEST! 
REMENDOUS SALES! 



lESCUE 8 SOLD 

N 75 MARKETS 

b start on the air prior to October ISffi/ 



SOLD TO THESE REGIONAL 
ADVERTISERS: 



ALKA SELTZER (West Coast) 
PRINCE MACARONI (New England) 
PURITY BISCUIT CO. (Southwest) 
UTICA CLUB BEER (New York State) 
MILLER HIGH LIFE BEER (Florida) 
WEINGARTEN STORES (Southeast Texas) 



HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORP. (Buffalo) 
DIXIE FOOD STORES (Louisville) 
I.G.A. FOOD DISTRIBUTORS (St. Louis) 
"BIG 8" STORES (El Paso) 
MILLERS MARKETS (Denver) 
PRODUCERS DAIRY (Fresno) 
SUPER DUPER MARKETS (Columbus, O.) 
SALT LAKE MATTRESS CO. (Salt Lake City) 
SAN ANTONIO SAVINGS & LOAN ASS'N. 
PAN AMERICAN BANK (Miami) (^an Antonio) 
BOYNTON BROS. TIRES (Bakersfield) 
P-R MACARONI PRODUCTS (Albany) 
CARTER PETROLEUM PRODUCTS (Denver) 
CRESCENT CREAMERY (Reno) 



SOLD TO THESE STATIONS: 



PITTSBURGH 

NEW ORLEANS 

TULSA 

CHARLOTTE 

NASHVILLE 

SHREVEPORT 

BATON ROUGE 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

LAS VEGAS 

ALBUQUERQUE 

EUREKA 

MEDFORD 

BILLINGS 

SANTA BARBARA 

PUEBLO 

CHICO 

IDAHO FALLS 

LITTLE ROCK 

GREAT FALLS 

TWIN FALLS 



WTAE 
WWL 

KVOO 

WBTV 
WSM 
KSLA 

WBRZ 
KRDO 
KLAS 
KOAT 
KIEM 
KBES 
KGHL 
KEY-T 
KCSJ 
KHSL 
KID 
KATV 
KRTV 
KLIX 



kon't delay! Some choice markets SCREEN "^GEMS INC. 
|,. stiil available! Contact: television subsidiary of •^'irl Columbia pictures corp. 



"It's 

bigger 

than 

both 

of 

us!" 





•^ ffis teleViS^IS^fflF movie cartoonsfis now making 
its biggest hit. Producing animated film commercials which combine creativity 1 
with salesmanship. Creating entertaining sales messages for some of the most i 
successful agencies serving major national and regional advertisers. 

Like Young & Rubicam for Piel Bros.; Benton & Bowles for General Foods; 
Marschalk & Pratt Division of McCann-Erickson for Mennen and Genesee; Ted 
Bates for Colgate-Palmolive; Campbell -Ewald for General Motors; Compton for \ 
Socony Mobil; Dancer- Fitzgerald- Sample for General Mills; William Esty for] 
R. J. Reynolds and P. Ballantine; Wherry, Baker & Tilden for Quaker Oats. 

It figures. For TERRYTOONS is the oldest (and second largest) animated filml 
company in the nation. Its newly-modernized plant houses the very latest camera, 
sound and animation equipment, and a staff of nearly a hundred craftsmen and 
artists . . . the same experts who create cartoon favorites for the CBS Television 
Network and theatrical cartoons, in Cinema Scope and Technicolor, distributed 
throughout the world by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation. 

Animate your sales picture with cartoon commercials from TERRYTOONS ® 

; - . MddismiAve., New York 22, or 3S Centre Ave. , A'r/r i:<>chelle, N. Y. -A Division of CBS Television Film Sal^- Inc. 



From Rochester's CHANNEL lO 

A Double Toast to 
Our Advertisers:— 



'EARS TO YOU' 




EYES LOVE YOU" 



Yes, you get the majority* of 
the eyes and ears in the rich 
Rochester area when you ad- 
vertise your product on 

CHANNEL 10 



a TELEPULSE Mar 



IT ALL 




^^49th anc 
^El Madisonl 



Commercial Com 






In the August 16, 1958 issue of 
SPONSOR there was a very kind column 
on French's Instant Potato commer- 
cials. We think our salesmen would be 
pleased to see this, and in a few in- 
stances may make good use of it with 
the trade. May we have your permis- 
sion to make 500 reprints of the article, 
with appropriate credit to sponsor? 
George Hamiliton 
Atlantis Sales Corp. 
Rochester N. Y. 



eof, r 



reprint SPONSOR i 



Double take? 

Business evidently remains brisk for 
that camel-producing committee of 
yours. I Horse produced by a commit- 
tee is a camel — Ten Second Spot) 

Wasn't it already at the same noble 
cause, in the same column of sponsor, 
some six months ago? 

John C. Ottinger Jr. 



Backstage plaudits 

I was tremendously impressed by the 
clear thinking demonstrated in Joe 
Csida's column in the August 23 issue 
of Sponsor. This is exactly the posi- 
tion that our company has taken and 
which expresses itself in somewhat 
more detail in the attached booklet 
which we recently distributed to agen- 
cies and stations. 

For too many years this business has 
been operated by a cliche. The cur- 
rent ones are Top 40, Rock and Roll, 
and Music and News. Mr. Csida ap- 
parently has grasped the idea that each 
of these terms is, in itself, virtually 
meaningless. He apparently also has 
grasped the key idea that running a 
good radio station today is a difficult 
and exacting job and that the sum total 
of a radio station operation is com- 
posed of many important elements. I 
particularly appreciate your reference 

(Please turn to page 12) 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



WSBT-TV 



PRIMARY COVERAGE- 



752,580 TV VIEWERS IN 
PROSPEROUS MICHIANA* 



Here's How 

WSBT-TV DELIVERS 

the South Bend-Elkhart 

TV Audience 



TOP RATED 50 TV PROGRAMS IN 
SOUTH BEND-ELKHART MARKET 



WSBT-TV CARRIES .... 

• The Top 7 programs 

• 8 of fhe top 10 programs 

• 17 of the top 25 programs 

• 30 of the top 50 programs 



^^H ARB Ratings-June 17-23 

No other station or combination of stations comes 
close to WSBT-TV in the number of top-rated shows 
carried. Further proof of this overwhelming viewer 
preference is the fact that WSBT-TV's 10 P.M. news 
broadcast is one of the highest-rated local or national 
newscasts in the Nation! . . . You're paying for audi- 
ence-get it with WSBT-TV. Ask your Raymer man for 
details or write to this station. 

* 15 counties in Northern Indiana and 

Southern Michigan. UHF set count, 209,050 

— 3.6 persons per family. 




CBS... A CSS iASIC OPTIONAL 



SOUTH 
BEND, 
IND. 

CHANNEL 

22 



ASK PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE | ,'1";;;,,?,"" 



49TH & MADISON 

\ Cont'd from page 10 I 

lo the job that Ben Strouse is doing 
with his editorials. There are many 
business advantages to editorializing; 
but to my mind, the most important 
thinfi about it is that Ben is perform- 
ing a genuine public service rather 
than trying to fool the public and the 
Commission. Ben's operation is a per- 
fect example that the use of popular 
nmsic as program material is entirely 
compatible with real service to the 
])ul)lic. Thank you for being so per- 
cejitive about our business. 

Wells H. Barnett 
Station Operations Mgr. 
John Blair & Co. 

Joe Csida's comments in your August 
23 column are one of the nicest things 
that ever happened to WWDC. 

The issue has only been out a few 
days and the reaction has been star- 
tling. Just this morning, one of our 
salesmen called me from Baltimore, 
where an agency timebuyer had clipped 
the article and circulated it among 
their account executives. 

We are very grateful and deter- 
mined to do an even better job in the 
future. 

Thanks again. 

Ben Strouse 
President 
WWDC, Inc . 
Washington, D. C. 

Down under 

Your article "What You Should Know 
About Tv Film," page 40 sponsor 
magazine. May 3, 1958 issue, contains 
important information for prospective 
television clients. 

Television is anticipated for Bris- 
bane in early 1960 and we believe that 
your article would be of valuable as- 
sistance to proposed television spon- 
sors in Brisbane. 

Would you please advise the avail- 
ability of reprints of this article and 
the cost of such reprints, or alterna- 
tively could we have your authority to 
duplicate the article for submission to 
agency clients. 

R. F. Mitchell 
Tv/radio manager 
Cossey White Advt. 
Brisbane, Australia 

% R<l>rinl> of SPONSOR'S arlirles are frequently 
a«ailiil>l.'. Ral<> •!■ ri<|ur<it. PirniiBsion to repro- 
.- nia.1.' in writing and will be 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Young t^ Rubicam,'"'^° 

Adv&rtism^ 

KEWTOKK ■ CBJCAOO ■ DETROIT ■ SAK FRANCISCO ■ lOS ANOELBS ■ HOLLYWOOD ■ M 
LONDON ■ MEXICO CITY ■ FRANKEUBT ■ SAN JUAN ■ CARACAS 





VoUf) ea/ri pica/ A^ eMe/Q vMif... 



Some products call for TV commercials that sell 
fortissimo — with force and directness. 

Odiers are better suited to the pianissimo ap- 
proach — using commercials that sell softly, with 



ingratiating indirectness, charm and mood. And 
being able to create both types is important. 

It's even more important to know xrhen to use 
u'/ttc/i, if you want your sales to end uj) hravissimo! 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^ 









w 






It's quite a combination. Baltimore— second 
fastest-growing city on the Eastern seaboard 
. . . sixth largest city in the country. Balti- 
more—a widely diversified industrial city, 
with a healthy median family income of 
$4920, A central city between north and 
south, with a balanced representation of 
tastes and trends. A progressive city that is 
just beginning to "feel its oats," yet a con- 
servative city that acts on facts. Most im- 
portant as a test market, Baltimore is a con- 
centrated, compact city. Its better than one 



and a half million inhabitants live within a 
15-mile radius of City Hall. This means you 
can get your test answers in a hurry, and 
without spending a small fortune. Especially 
when you use W-I-T-H— the one radio station 
that gives you complete, no-waste coverage of 
metropolitan Baltimore at guaranteed lowest- 
cost-per -thousand listeners by far . . . and pro- 
vides powerful merchandising "pluses" no 
other local station can come close to. Put 
Baltimore and Station W-I-T-H together . . . 
to work profitably for you. 




Tom Tinsley, President 



R. C. Embry, Vice-President 



National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Ptiiladelphia, Baltimore, Washington; Simmons Associates in Pittsburgti, New 
England, Mid-West; Clarke Brown Co. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, Miami, New Orleans; McGavren-Quinn in Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles. 



Baltimore's your 
best test market- 
and WITH your 
best test station! 

«^*v '^^ ^'^ 

^ W W 

Wl ^W\ Wk 



I 



P' 



iU)U0(U«i 



Take your choice of one or more 
of FIVE complete plans— all of 
them guaranteed to provide 
maximum impact for your prod- 
uct at point-of-purchase. Plan 
1 lets you choose your food 
chain. Plan 2 gives you three 
chains. Plan 3 is a "powerhouse" 
with a pre-selected chain. Plan 
4— Feature Foods Merchandis- 
ing—covers 60 of the highest 
volume food stores in Balti- 
more. Plan 5 — Community Club 
Awards — enlists the buying 
strength of Baltimore's leading 
women's clubs in your behalf 
—reaches over 200,000 people. 
Whichever plan you select, you 
get the full merchandising treat- 
ment—on the air, in the mail, 
and — most important — at 
point-of-sale. And it's all yours 
on a 13-week, test-period basis ! 






P 



OimA 



Here's a real test-market 
"must." With your participa- 
tion in W-I-T-H Community 
Club Awards, you can avail 
yourself of our Consumer Panel 
of 500 members. These average 
citizens, representing a cross- 
section of Baltimore consumers, 
will provide the basic research 
you need in any or all of the 
following ways: 

1— Testing and sampling. 
2— Periodic market checks. 
3— Developing "trend" data. 
4— Helping to determine buy- 
ing and usage habits. 
5 — Reaction to advertising. 

In essence, the W-I-T-H Con- 
sumer Panel can help you 
evaluate your standing in the 
Baltimore market— accurately, 
regularly, economically. 



ojimU 



This is a brand new and ex- 
clusive W-I-T-H merchandising 
service. A food store audit panel 
of 12 high-volume outlets will 
be measured on a continuing 
basis every other week. Shelf 
stock will be counted, store- 
rooms checked and invoices 
examined. Subscribers will re- 
ceive reports showing how their 
product fared as to: 

1— Unit volume of sales for each 
brand in a product category. 

2— Unit share for each brand. 

3— Dollar sales of each brand. 

4— Dollar brand share of 
market. 

Available whether or not you're 
a W-I-T-H advertiser— but far 
lower in cost if you are! 



O UXST/MM D I IM O 

The America's Cup race is outstanding as a 
sailing classic. Equally outstanding in its field is 
WGAL-TV's unique multi-city coverage which costs 
you less by far than single-city coverage. Pioneer 
Channel 8 station WGAL-TV is first with viewers 
in Lancaster, Harrisburg, York, as well as in 
numerous other cities including: Gettysburg, Hanover, 
Lebanon, Chambersburg, Carlisle, Lewistown. 




CHANNEL 8-Lancaster, Pa. 

NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION • Clair McCollough, Pres. 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 ^lie station rep business this week decided to do some remodeling of its 

copyriaht 1958 liouse, both inside and out. 

A major part of the plan is that SRA will devise a code of standard practices via 
a committee headed by Bob Eastman. 

The project has, apparently, a two-fold objective: (1) Clarify and standardize pro- 
cedures for doing business with agencies, stations, and among reps themselves; and (2) 
create a favorable image of the station rep in his relations with the advertising business 
and the broadcast industry. 

As far as the industry is concerned, the imagery job will be directed especially at 
the newer generation in both station management and timebuying. One function of the 
code will be to make clear the more or less complex functions that the rep performs 
as a bridge between the seller and the buyer. 

Among the topics that the architects of the code will attempt to tackle head-on: Pro- 
cedures for one rep turning over a station to another; standard services due the sta- 
tion and the buyer; commercial content; the use of competitive tapes in competing 
for business; rules of conduct in accepting various types of dubious products; double and 
triplespotting; local vs. national rates. 



New national spot business is moving along at a smart clip. 

Radio activity via New York agencies includes Dodge (Grant), four weeks in 125 mar- 
kets, starting 4 October; Ford (JWT), 10-15 spots a week, starting 12 October; White Owl 
fY&R). 60 markets: Leeming (EstjO, 26 weeks of 20 minutes a week, over 100 markets; 
National Carbon (Esty), Eveready batteries and Prestone, eight weeks. 

In Minneapolis, Cream of Wheat (BBDO) was being reactivated in spot radio via 
30-seconds in prime time in 30 markets. 

On the spot tv side, the action in New York includes Gold Medal Products 
(DFS); and Standard Brands' Fleischmann's Yeast (JWT), daytime and night participa- 
tions. In Chicago: Alberto-Culver Co. for VO-5 (Wade), 25 markets for 52 weeks, six 
night-time minutes per week: Pharma-Craft for Coldene (JWT), daytime and late night min- 
utes for 25 weeks. 



Spot tv has the bellwether of the advertising pack, P&G, firmly in its corner 
for the next nine months. 

The Cincinnati giant will spend more money in spot tv than for any like period in the 
medium's history. 

P&G is sold on the idea that for merchandising there's nothing like the reach of tv, 
and that to capitalize on this draAving power there's nothing like saturation flights. 



Foote, Cone & Belding's Chicago office is spearheading a movement to do a 
survey on the fin audience in that city (probably via the personal-interview technique) . 

FCB's initial problem is how to get the funds for the project. It's thinking about 
asking other agencies as well as the Chicago fra interests to contribute. 

Meantime Sinclair has joined Shell, Cities Service, and Oklahoma Oil as local 
users of Chicago fm. 

Added note: Bell Savings & Loan this week assumed sponsorship of speakers at the 
luncheons of the Chicago Executive Club over WKFM. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



Two Chicago accounts were testing tv spots this week. 

Mars, via Knox Reeves, has a new I.D. going in the Los Angeles market for eight 
weeks; meantime Quaker Oats is testing for a new dry cereal in Omaha, Albany, N. Y., and 
other markets. 

Another Chicago agency, Henri, Hurst & McDonahl, is testing a spot radio campaign 
in Peoria for Linco Pine-Glo ammonia. 



CBS TV certainly isn't adding any balm to NBC TV's "summer delay" pre- 
dicament. CBS TV announced this week that it will not expect affiliates to defray any 
part of the network's expense in relaying programs in standard time areas during the 
1959 daylight saving season. 

NBC TV previously had suggested that its affiliates pay 51/i% of such expenses, 
and the stations' response was anything but favorable. 



Network radio's standout sale of the week came from Parker Games, Boston. 

Highlights of the transaction with NBC Radio: 35 commercials a week from 22 Sep- 
tember to Christmas; covers the whole company's line but stresses the game called Careers; 
a closed circuit will be staged for store buyers across the country 28 October. 

CBS Radio's order — from Standard Brands — was five 10-minute segments of Ar- 
thur Godfrey across the board. Godfrey, incidentally, has been cut down to 55 minutes daily, 
with the initial five minutes of what had been an hour's show made available for a newscast. 

Added note on NBC: Effective last week, 41 advertisers were in line to kick ofif 
fall campaigns. Four of them were in the renewal category. 



Looks like R. J. Reynolds not only will retain its money-making lead among the 
cigarette giants for the current calendar year but move ahead of American Tobacco as the 
No. 1 shipper of the product. 

Authorities in the field estimate that Reynolds will gross $1.1 billion for its three brands 
as compared to $1.05 billion by American Tobacco for its nine brands. 

Reynolds is expected to show its biggest quarter (the third) in history for both 
sales and profits. 

Corollary observation: 

Marketing experts hold that no type of goods is so sensitive to the influence of ad- 
vertising as cigarettes. 

(For updated report on cigarettes in tv see 16 August SPONSOR, page 33.) 



Michigan Avenue reps are getting doleful as they envision more and more 
of their regular accounts going into the local buying camp. 

The cause of their latest twinge: Norge, most of whose buying is being done this season 
on a local basis. 

They recognize that it's part of a current trend among district sales managers, if 
not distributors, to gain greater control over the advertising dollar (see page 8, 30 
August SPONSOR), but that doesn't assuage the feeling of frustration. 

Here's an anecdote, relayed by a rep this week, which illustrates the degree to which 
agencies in the Southeast disregard all but the local rate. 

The rep's Atlanta office got a wire from a regional agency with a cold remedy ac- 
count asking it to quote rates for a southern station. Added the telegram: Don't sup- 
ply SRDS rates as the budget doesn't allow for it. Also: Give us the latest Pulse and 
Hooper ratings for the station. 

Wired back the rep: Sorry, only the SRDS rates are available to that account. 

Replied the agency: Never mind the rates; just send us the ratings. 

Latest frustration for reps in that area: The Westinghouse representative who travels 
out of its Atlanta office placing institutional schedules at local rates. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



AGENCY 


NO. SHOWS 


J. Walter Thompson 


14 


Ted Bates 


11 


McCann-Erickson 


10 


BBDO 


10 


Benton & Bowles 


9 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 


7 


William Esty 


6 


Lennen & Newell 


6 


Young & Rubicam 


5 


SSCB 


5 


Compton 


5 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


6 


Leo Burnett 


6 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



If Washinglon trust-busters take another look at how much control the giant 
Madison Avenue agencies have over network prime time, they're in for a surprise. 

For agency control has been thinned out appreciably and there's been quite a 
j)ickup of network nighttime participation among the medium-class agencies. 

An analysis of the fall setup by SPONSOR-SCOPE this week shows that the four giants 
(JWT, Y&R, BBDO and McCann-Erickson) are the agencies of record of only 
31^ half -hours of the 112 night-time half -hours filled or partially filled by adver- 
tisers. 

Herewith is a breakdown of the agency- of -record position of 13 Madison Avenue and 
Chicago agencies for the fall: 

TOTAL 1^ HRS PER WEEK 
10 

9M. 

9 

7 



41/2 
51/2 
3 
3 



Note: This compilation does not include specials, news programs, or seasonal 

campaigns; it refers only to half -hour and hour shows. 

P.S.: The agency that's made the most substantial progress on the network tv side 

is Bates (last season it was agency-of-record for but 3% half-hours). BBDO meantime has 
swung its tv billings weight more than ever toward the specials this season. McCann-Erick- 
son leans somewhat in that direction, too. 

If Chrysler has plans of putting its foreign car, Simca, on network tv, Renault 
has beat it to the punch. 

Renault, via Needham, Louis & Brorby, this week bought seven broadcasts of 
Small World (Murrow-Friendly) on CBS TV, starting 5 October. Cost of the pro- 
gram: $28,000 gross. 

Chances are that Renault's entry will stir its competitors to take a similar slab at 
network tv. 

More network tv shows are going to have the corporate, or product, name in 
the program title this season. 

The tally this fall is 15, compared to 14 a year ago. 

The roster consists of Alco Theatre, Armstrong Circle Theatre, Pat Boone and His Chevy 
Showroom, the Chevy Show (Dinah Shore), Dodge Dance Party (Lawrence Welk), Ford 
Theatre (Tennessee Ernie), Goodyear Theatre, GE Theatre, Lux Playhouse, Music from Man- 
hattan (Sammy Kaye), Oldsmobile Show (Patti Page), Plymouth Show (Welk), Schlitz Play- 
house, Voice of Firestone, and U.S. Steel Hour. 

CBS TV wound up July with a minus mark as against the year before in its 
reported gross time billings. 

According to LNA-BAR. CBS TV's gross of $18,273,690 was 1.4% less than the figure 
estimated for July 1957. NBC TV came through with a gross of $15,702,029, or 13.2% 
better than the July before, while ABC TV was credited with $7,083,555, an increase of 
11.6% above the previous July. 

The three networks collectively showed a plus of 5.9% for July, while the edge 
for the initial seven months of the year figured 12%. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



P&G is introdueing via Tic Tac Dough its latest system of revolving the com- 
mercials for four products on a single half-hour show. 

Each program will be limited to three products. The brands involved: Lilt, Zest, Tide, 
and Prell. 

A major reason for adopting this course: Increased frequency for a brand as well as 
an offset to the medium's rising costs. 

CBS, Inc's management pointed with pride this week to some company statis- 
tics during a businessmen's luncheon in L.A. at which the CBS board were the guests. 

The last time the hoard held a meeting in L.A. was five years ago. In the in- 
terim, said speaker Frank Stanton: 

CBS, Inc's volume has doubled; CBS TV has become the largest advertising me- 
dium in the world; and profits from all broadcasting activities have tripled. 

Business trend analysts this week harped on a turn in the economy that bodes 
well for the air media in particular. 

The development : Retailers are showing confidence in the immediate future by build- 
ing back their inventories in substantial quantities. 

Another sign that consumer activity is on the upswing: July was the worst month in 
recent history for savings institutions, although consumer incomes have remained sizable; 
the money thus isn't being socked away. 

Media buyers will be interested in the Farm Markets Facts Sheet devised by the 
National Association of TvRadio Farm directors. 

It standardizes the sort of information that an agency or ad manager wants from 
farm stations nowadays. 

The sheet goes into such statistical data as coverage, number of farms, income, and 
farm production units. 

It also gives details about a station's programing, personalities (whether they handle 
commercials), the station's off-the-air activities, background of farm department personnel, 
and lists of advertisers and their schedules. 

Agency management is becoming aware that the hangdog look timebuyers 
often have isn't because of the amount of work so much as because of inner agitation 
over status. 

They feel that the title — timebuyer — has outlived its original meaning and 
scope, and that a first-rate man or woman in the field has assumed functions and responsi- 
bilities that merit a more suitable label — like "media analyst." 

Alert agency executives realize that the timebuyer in an efficiently functioning 
agency has vastly changed his role. 

If he knows his job, this is his area of operation in order to get the optimum for 
the client's dollar: 

• Initiate the right spot plan, once he gets his list of markets. 

• Evaluate what sort of schedule will fit in best with the product's marketing ob- 
jectives. 

• Be fully conversant with what all the other groups on the product are doing 
so that his schedule or timing don't get out of gear with the others and thereby jam up the 
machinery. 

• Recheck his lines at intervals to make sure that the schedule is working out for the 
best interests of the product and the present marketing campaign. 



For other ne<v« coverage in this issuer see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 74; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 76; Washington Week, page 89; sponsor 
Hears, page 90; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 96; and Film-Scope, page 87. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




S]:iip>p>iii.g . 



A 60,000,000 TON INDUSTRY IN DULUTH-SUPERIOR 

TODAY— World's 2nd largest port! 
TOMORROW— Terminus of the great St. Lawrence Seaway! 



^^CU 





\y is Complex 
And hard to appease. 

He searches his dial 
For something to please! 



Every market is just as complex 
as the individuals within it. To 
penetrate complex markets, you 
must first penetrate the complex 
minds within them. It takes a flex- 
ible medium like radio, pro- 
grammed with the individual in 
mind to do the job effectively and 
economically. 

In Greater Los Angeles, it takes 
KHJ Radio. For 36 years, KHJ 
has featured FOREGROUND 
SOUND . . . news, sports, discus- 
sion, commentary, quiz, dramatic 
and variety programs... designed 
to appeal to the complex minds 
in America's Second Market. 

Never underestimate the variety 
of tastes that make up the Los 
Angeles market. Here is a medium 
programmed to satisfy them all. 



KHJ 

RADIO 

LOS ANOELES 

131.-) North Vine Street 



H 



Timebuyers 
at work 



Ed Ratner, Friend-Reiss Advertising. Inc., New York, feels that one 
of the biggest problems is explaining to the unsophisticated adver- 
tiser why his schedules can't be confirmed by the stations five and 
six months in advance so that he can merchandise his advertising. 
"At this time of year." Ed says, "our shop is doing a lot of buying 
for manufacturers whose peak sell- 
ing period is Christmas. Most of 
these campaigns break in October 
and November and are not yet 
confirmed. Yet one manufacturer 
with another agency, either by de- 
sign or ignorance, has put out an 
elaborate brochure detailing the 
time, stations and programs of his 
November campaign. When our 
clients see this they naturally want 
to know how come 'he can do it 
and we can't.' At this point, we 
produce station logs, letters, etc., proving that to date more than 
20% of the programs listed in the brochure won't even be on the 
air this fall due to network and station changes. We make our point, 
then present some very effective television pre-merchandising plans — 
but life would be less hectic if we had earlier confirmations." 



Edith Krams Whaley, Stromberger, Lavene, McKenzie, Los 

Angeles, calls for "all heads out of the sand' when it comes to in- 
clude or not include timebuyers in original planning, artistic and tv 






i a campaign, 
fie knowledge 




aren't statisticians," she says, 
about flexibilities of buying time, limi- 
tations and availabilities, and what 
the competition is doing right now 
that should be considered early in 
the planning." She cites an exam- 
ple: "In some instances minute 
commercials have been prepared 
with a specific audience in mind. 
It is the buyer's unhappy task to 
explain that minute announce- 
ments are not sold in the time pe- 
riod desired to reach this audi- 
ence. The commercials then must 
either be shelved or used in time 
cannot deliver the size or type of audience desired. 
The only other alternative is to produce new ones. Edith thinks that 
the policy of allowing buyers to participate in early planning stages 
saves time, expense and loss of accounts early in the game. She 
is present al original planning sessions on all her accounts at SLM. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




WWVA sells the heart of industrial 
America... FIRST in every time period 



Did you know that there is only one single medium of 
any kind that can give you dominant coverage of the 
2M billion dollar Upper Ohio River Valley Market? 

Only radio successfully jumps the mountain barriers 
of this booming area— and only WWVA provides the 
dominant selling voice you need. The latest PULSE 
(Jan. 1958) proves again that WWVA is first in every 
time period, 6 A.M. to midnight, 7 days a week. Its 
average audience Mondays thru Fridays tops the next 
3 stations combined! 

Use the 50,000 Watt Voice of WWVA in WheeHng 
to reach 486,000 radio homes in this key market, plus 
a big audience bonus in 29 other counties. 

See your |ohn Blair rep today 




mnim 



■WHgBLINO ARBA 






iSt03?ei* IRaxiio 



Wheeling Cleveland Detroit 



WIBG 

Philadelphia 



WSPD 

Toledo 



>VAGA 

Atlanta 



WGBS 

Miami 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




fej©w 

DEEP 
MARKET? 




HIGH 

isik 

COST? 

Peters, Griffik,, 



NEW YORK 

250 Park Avenue 
Yukon 6-7900 

ATLANTA 

Glenn BIdg. 
Murray 8-5667 



CHICAGO 

Prudential Plaza 
Franklin 2-6373 

DALLAS 

335 Merchandise Mart 
Riverside 7-2398 



DETROIT 

Penobscot BIdg. 
Woodward 1-4255 

FT. WORTH 

406 W. Seventh St. 
Edison 6-3349 



HOLLYWOOD 

1750 N. Vine St. 
Hollywood 9-1688 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Russ Building 
Yukon 2-9188 



Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 



Reach or frequency - or both -is a media question that can 
make big differences in sales results. But there is a way, with 
Spot Radio, to get the best combination for your advertising. 



Ik DSC] Kjslimk liav£"tk ^ 



;^uuers... 



Your sales objectives can be accomplished by the best strat- 
egy for each individual market. There's no need to com- 
promise with one plan. Let us consult with you in developing 
a thorough market-by-market campaign. 



■^H 


f THE CALL LETTERS 


1^1 


^ OF THE 


H 


SALES GETTERS 


W 


West 


1 


KBOI-Boise 5,000 

KGMB-KHBC-Honolulu-Hilo 5,000 

KEX-Portland 50,000 

KIRO-Seattle 50,000 


m 


oo:dw^ 


ii> 


1 o 



Midwest 

WHO-Des Moines 50,000 

woe-Davenport 5,000 

WDZ-Decatur 1,000 

WDSM-Duluth-Superior . . 5,000 

WDAY- Fargo 5,000 

WOWO-Fort Wayne .... 50,000 

WIRE-lndianapolis .... 5,000 

KMBC-KFRM-Kansas City 5,000 

WISC-Madison, Wis. . . . 1,000 

WMBD-Peoria 5,000 



IMC. 



Southwest 



East 



^i 



WBZ+WBZA- Boston and 

Springfield 51,000 
WGR-Buffalo 5,000 



KYW-Cleveland 
WWJ- Detroit 
WJIM-Lansing . 
KDKA-Pittsburgh 



50,000 

5,000 

250 



KFDM-Beaumont . . . 5,000 
KRYS-Corpus Christi . . 1,000 
WBAP-Fort Worth-Dallas 50,000 
KTRH-Houston .... 50,000 
KENS-San Antonio . . . 50,000 



Southeast 

WCSC-Charleston, S. C. 
WIST-Charlotte .... 
WIS-Columbia, S. C. . . 
WSVA-Harrisonburg, Va. 
WPTF-Raleigh-Durham . 
WDBJ-Roanoke .... 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
50,000 
5,000 



hy lohn E. McMiUin 




Commercial 
commentary 

Why the biggest aren't the best 

A couple of weeks ago, in this space, I bitterly 
criticized the current state of P&G commercials, 
and ended my tirade by asking grumpily, Is 
today's best advertising being done by the 
biggest advertisers? 

1 am informed by reliable experts in the pub- 
lishing business that approximately 71.2% of 
all editors who ask such loud rhetorical questions 
(in either headlines or copy) fully expect to answer themselves with 
a resounding "No." And I find I am no exception to the statistic. 

I don't believe that today's best advertising is being done by such 
titans as P&G, General Foods, General Motors, Lever, American 
Tobacco, and others in the top 10. 

1 think you're much more apt to find outstanding examples of 
advertising creativeness amid the radio and tv commercials of 
.smaller, younger, more imaginative companies ( Revlon and Lestoil 
to name two) who are now fighting their way to the top. 

Similarly, I know that it pays to pay attention to the commercials 
that emanate from some of the smaller agencies (under $50 million 
in billing). And, in your search for really outstanding advertising, 
it's well to look beyond Madison Ave. to such clearer, more truly 
American climates as Chicago, and the West Coast. 

Advertising and the Middle-aged Mind 

There's nothing very original, of course, about such statements. 
Native son admen, and small agency operators have been making 
them for years (often without very much success). 

So far, though, I've never seen any published explanation for the 
phenomena. Why is it (as any honest adman will admit) that such 
a staggering amount of mediocre stuff pours forth annually from 
the offices of some of the biggest advertisers and agencies? 

Here are a few theories: I suspect, first of all, that any large 
formal organization (client or agency) tends to develop middle-aged 
minds in very young people with lightning-like speed. 

When youngsters come bouncing into the ad business, fresh out 
of college, they are often bursting with enthusiasm, imagination and 
ideas. Most of the ideas aren't very good. But at least, there's a spark, 
and freshness, and creative potential in those who suggest them. 

However, before many of these kids ever have a chance to learn 
how to discipline and harness their creativity, they start to get 
pushed up the ladder toward the "executive type" jobs — supervisors, 
assistant account men, etc. 

Here's where the middle-agedness begins. For they cease to be 
concerned with imagination and ideas, and tend toward typically 
middle-aged preoccupations with dollar signs, and costs, and sales 
figures and statistics, and dividends and pension plans and (God 
save the mark) whether they can retire at age 5.5. 

As a result, you'll find along Madison Ave. more .51-year old minds 
{Please turn to page 30) 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




CBS • CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Represented Nationotly by The Katz Agency, inc. 



f^$ Stores Television. 



Cleveland Detr 



AVJBK-TV ^VAGA-TV >VVUE-TV WSPD-TV 



Wilmington- Philadelphia Toledo 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



JGHT 



is aviation's own saga— authentically dramatized exploits 



human achievement in the sky. Each episode is presented by Gen. George Kenne ' 
cooperation of the Air Force. FLIGHT is the dramatic series for which the comi * 




[linary men suddenly summoned to super- 
3. A. F., Ket., and produced with the full 
3vision season will long be remembered. 



NBC TELEVISION FILMS-A 



CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 





Smart advertisers take the 
KOA-Radio route to the Rocky 
Mountain West. No other me- 
dium in this rich Western market 
can compare with KOA for: 

COVERAGE: KOA travels into 302 
counties of 12 states ... covering 
over 1,100,000 square miles and 
populated by approximately AVi 
million people. 

POWER: KOA's pov/erful 50,000 
watt voice is heard throughout the 
West . . . reaching listeners on bofb 
sides of the Continental Divide. 

ACCEPTABILITY: KOA program 
ming is carefully planned for lis- 
tener enjoyment. Since 1924, KOA- 
Radio has been a respected friend 
to Westerners. They have learned 
to depend on popular KOA and 
NBC personalities and programs for 
informative and entertaining 






mg. 



SALES: The KOA-Rodio route is the 
West's best way to sell your product 
to over 4 million potential customers. 
Remember, it's results that count! 

GET ON- 

STAY ON*- KOA-RADIO! 

It's the only station you need to 
route your product directly to the 
entire Western market. 




nohono/// by 

Henry I. Christal Co., Inc. 



I 



Commercial commentary continued . 



in 34-year old bodies than almost anywhere else in the world. And 
creativity, in the big shops where these old young men work, suffers 
fearfully as a consequence. 

A second, somewhat more flattering reason for the low grade of 
creative work on many large national accounts, is that such ad- 
vertisers try, with typical business efficiency, to sort out and accentu- 
ate the Ponderables — those elements of advertising which can be 
measured with some degree of exactness. 

There's nothing wrong with this. It's just good business to try to 
develop sound marketing plans and strategies, and to base them on 
facts, research, careful budgeting, and precise media buying. 

For the truth is (and until you learn this about advertising you 
haven't graduated from kindergarten) a sound, carefully planned 
campaign, even though dull, can usually lick the pants off brilliantly 
imaginative advertising that is rooted in quicksand. 

P&G, to my own personal knowledge, has frequently beaten the 
brains out of its competition with some very mediocre copy. 

But this in itself does not constitute an argument against adver- 
ti.sing creativeness. A truly great campaign is always a combination 
of brilliant planning and brilliant creative work. That's the most 
efficient way to advertise. And it's also the most fun. 

Needed: A Creative Revolution 

In recent years we've heard a lot of whooping and hollering about 
the importance of marketing in the ad agency business. 

We've seen both media and research emerge as powerful, policy- 
making factors in agency operations. 

But while this has been happening, the creative departments of 
many large agencies have been sitting on their hands in bewildered 
frustration at their sudden change of status. If I had to predict the 
next big development in the agency business, I'd bet on a "creative 
revolution" in the next 10 or 15 years. 

It will happen because it has to. 

The day of the old fashioned "copy genius" has passed and I, for 
one, say good riddance. He was, in many cases, a stuffy poseur with 
a vastly over-rated reputation built on a handful of flossily written 
print ads. He was pompous and prejudiced, and difficult to work 
with and terribly limited in scope. 

But so far, the silhouette, or profile, of the new type of agency 
creative man, has not yet emerged very clearly. 

Obviously they are going to have to be built around the domi- 
nance of tv, and the importance of tv techniques. Obviously, too, 
they're going to have to be integrated far more closely with media, 
marketing and research, than they have ever been before. 

But in addition, they're going to have to develop brand new tech- 
niques for training people in "disciplined creativity" — the ability to 
come up with imaginative new ideas that are precisely on target. 
And the ability to execute these ideas with all the resources and 
technical skill of a thoroughly schooled and disciplined craftsman. 

When such a "creative revolution" takes place (and I'll give you 
five to one that it happens) then you're bound to see better advertis- 
ing by the biggest advertisers than you're seeing now. 

Meanwhile, though, I wouldn't worry about it too much if I were 
a medium-sized agency or advertiser. You still have an enormous 
chance, while the big boys are floundering around. If you can 
strengthen your marketing and maintain your creative superiority, 
you can take sales and business from them — any day! ^ 



f 



• 13 SEPTEMBKR 1958 








..=~-T ^ 





riini'Kr 



* 



starring Robert Shaw 

low AVAILABLE FOR SYNDICATION 



'le bold panorama and sweep of the Spanish 
ain and the days of Blackbeard . . . actual 
lleons,- real sea battles and slice-of-history 
•ries. All this gives the full-scale production of 
'HE Buccaneers" its salty authenticity. 
)BERT Shaw stars as the daring captain of the 
iccaneers, searching the pirate-infested seas of 
: Carribean for adventure and lost treasure. 
)w after two years on networks — where it 
ablished top ratings and new sales records for 
Msors . . . "The Buccaneers" is available 
syndication. Its proven appeal for every 
:mber of the family makes it a prestige show- 
ie for any product. 39 half-hour adventures. 



Look at the markets.. 


.large and small... and 


iSSS^t ajl 


see that The Buccaneers gets the major share of 


the audience. 


SHARE 


CITY 


SHARE 


^^ 


Baltimore 


68.7% 


New York City 


24.9% 


OFFICIAL FILMS, iNcJ 


Baton Rouge 


. 75.6% 


Norfolk 


72.8% 


25 West 45 th Street | 


Buflfalo 


59.8% 


Philadelphia . 


. 57.0% 


New York 36, N. Y. 


Charleston . 


60.4% 


Portland, Ore. 


. 55.7% 


PLaza 7-0100 


Chicago 


46.7% 


Pueblo-Colorado 






Detroit 

El Paso 


. 44.3% 
45.9% 


Springs 

Salt Lake City 


83.4% 
70.4% 


ATLAUTA/Jackson 2-4878 
Beverly HiLLs/C restview 6-3528 


Honolulu 


46.6% 


Seattle-Tacoma . 


42.0% 


Chicago/ Dearborn 2-5246 


Los Angeles 
Louisville 


34.1% 

. . 77.5% 


Spokane 
Washington . 


59.8% 
41.9% 


Dallas/ Emerson 8-7467 ] 
Ft. LAUDERDALE/Logan 6-1981 
MiNNEAPOLJs/fValnut 2-2743 


Milwaukee 


62.1% 


Winston-Salem 


64.0% 


San FRANCisco/7u«/per 5-3313 


Minneapolis 


39.8% 






St. Lovis/Yorktown 5-9231 



lively Channel 




WABD . . . 

pioneer television station 
in New York 
has now become 





METROPOLITAN 



I 



BROADCASTING CORPORATION 

WNEW AM FM/TV New York 
WTTG CH 5 Washington, D.C. 
WHK AM/FM Cleveland 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1958 



Network radio: new 
light on a tougli figlit 

^ Rebounding sharply after the past summer slump, 
nets expect a strong 4th quarter in battle for existence 

^ Totals won't reach 1957's $66 million volume, 
but autos and other new accounts are coming in fast 



Nel 



let work radio, using competitive 
sales tactics, much critized by other 
branches of air media, continues its 
tough, tenacious fight for bigger bill- 
ings and greater advertiser acceptance. 

Orders now on the books indicate a 
strong 4th quarter which should push 
this year's total close to ( but not 
above) 1957's highly satisfactory $66 
million figure. More significant, net 
radio has rebounded sharply after a 
slow spring and soft summer, caused 
by recession cut-backs, particularly 
among durables advertisers. 

Without going into the sales methods 
and strategies which have caused deep 
resentments among stations and reps, 
here are some new facts about the net- 
work picture which are heartening 
network officials this fall. 

• There'll be more different adver- 
tisers using net radio this year than 



ever before in history, at least 10% 
more than in all of last year. 

• Many new types of products, and 
netv industries are using net radio in 
19.58 for the first time. 

• The automotives are coming back 
strong — after nine months of uncer- 
tainty. 

• Network radio is figuring in many 
new multi-media campaigns, in com- 
bination with magazines, news supple- 
ments, tv. 

• Agencies are using more care, 
thought, and imagination in develop- 
ing special commercials for net radio. 

• Cost efficiency (homes per thou- 
sand I is reported better than ever. 

• New media-marketing strategies 
are developing unusual, and productive 
network-local combinations. 

• Stereophonic broadcasting (in 
combination with tv) is scheduled on 



FALL 1958 

Sold and unsold 

ABC 

1957 1958 



60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



CBS 



1957 

70 

60 — - 

50 - 
40 - 
30 - - 
20 - 
10 



n 



1958 



ill 



MUTUAL 

1957 1958 



60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



Lt|=_bl 



NBC 



60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 




THESE FOUR LEAD NET RADIO'S ALL-OUT FIGHT FOP 









Edwar.l J. I).- (.ra.>. 
'.p. in chaiiif. AHL Kadio 



Arthur Hull Havs, 

president, CBS Radio 



Armaiid Hammer, 

president, MBS 



network programs this fall. A rela- 
tively new concept, it may open up an 
entirely new range of air media uses. 

While the four networks are agreed 
that these things combine to produce 
a healthy, even optimistic, outlook for 
net radio in general, each is pursuing 
a highly individualistic policy regard- 
ing programing and sales, and there 
are sharp differences in their operating 
philosophies and billings. 

ABC expects strong sales increases 
this fall, and goes into the 4th quarter 
with an entirely different program pat- 
tern than it used in 1957. Last year 
(see chart on previous page) ABC pro- 
gramed a 50-hour schedule per week, 
and succeeded in selling only about 10 
hours of these. 

This year ABC has cut back its pro- 
graming schedule to 25 hours, and 
has already sold twice as much time 
for the fall quarter, as it had sold by 
the end of 1957. 

Many ABC shows have already 
reached an SRO status, and ABC has 
nothing on the air without several seg- 
ments sold. 

ABC's program philosophy in brief 
is to depend on news, sports and estab- 
lished, jtroven personalities. Negotia- 



tions are already under way with Dick 
Clark and other ABC TV stars for ad- 
ditional programs which will be added 
if, says Edward J. DeGray, v. p. in 
charge of ABC Radio, 'the sales atmos- 
phere'" warrants. Prospects at this 
time seem to be that ABC will prob- 
ably schedule 5 to 10 more hours of 
network programing during the 1958- 
.59 season than the 25 originally 
planned. 

CBS, long time leader in net radio 
billings, is facing stiff competition 
from NBC, and may relinquish its top 
spot in 1958. However, CBS reports 
$4 million already signed for fall 
business and is expecting a highly suc- 
cessful 1958, with more than 40 of 
its 65 hours of programing sold. 

Arthur Hull Hayes, CBS Radio pres- 
ident is highly optimistic about the 
sales surge bringing sponsors such as 
these to the CBS fold: R. J. Reynolds, 
Oldsmobile, Campbells Soup, Charles 
Pfjzer, Chrysler and duPont. Perhaps 
even more significant to the network 
chieftan is "new attention froin the 
industries' young timebuyers," little 
experienced before in network radio. 

In programing. CBS is standing finn 
on its conviction that "c<)ni|)lete pro- 



grams give an advertiser the best pro- 
tection." About half of CBS sales are 
in complete programs. 

CBS schedules offer the widest 
spread of program types, and focus on 
programs that require audience atten- 
tion, such as drainas and news analysis. 

NBC, according to Matthew J. Cul- 
ligan, executive v. p. in charge of the 
radio network, is "programing 6% 
more and selling 12% inore" than last 
year. Programing service will prob- 
ably climb to 65 hours a week with 45 
hours sold. NBC is claiining a 37% 
share of total radio net business. 

Among NBC's major programing in- 
novations this year is the "Stardust" 
package. Quickie programs of two and 
one-half minutes each will be sprinkled 
throughout Nightline and Monitor. So 
far. Bob Hope has come into the plan 
for Buick and Bob and Ray for Lucky 
Strike. Fibber McGee & Molly and 
Paul Winchell & Jerry Mahoney are 
also available, and NBC hopes to get 
Steve Allen, Ernie Kovacs and others 
to tape the blurb-length entertainment. 

NBC's sales attitude, strongly ori- 
ented to facts-and-figures, is expressed 
thus by George A. Graham, director of 
sales ])lanning. "We don't propose to 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



F(ISTENCE 




advertisers that they buy programs. 
We recommend dispersal and fre- 
quency." 

NBC is also selling a new concept 
tagged "Idea Planting." They contend 
that large expenditures in tv spectacu- 
lars and magazines lose impact because 
viewers and readers are unfamiliar 
with the campaign. So NBC recom- 
mends low-cost net radio in advance 
of such expenditures, to pre-condition 
customers to the meat of the sales 
story. 

MBS, least active of the networks, 
provides the most programing — more 
than 114 hours a week. Of these, 
however, only 37 hours are intended 
for sale. These are scheduled on an 
unusual 50-50 basis. News on the half 
hour is sold by the network without 
local commission. News on the hour is 
provided for local sale without income 
to Mutual. 

Mutual reports that 15 out of its 
-"own" 18y2 hours, under this arrange- 
ment, are already sold for fall, the 
same as in 1957. The balance of Mu- 
tual programing — 77 hours, mostly 
music — is provided for stations that 
may want to use it. 

Automotive activity is probably 



net radio's biggest single-industry news 
this fall. The auto companies have 
jumped back in, tail fins and all. with 
substantial expenditures. Buick has 
signed with NBC for Bob Hope. ABC 
is scheduling Pontiac for the Notre 
Dame Football Games, and CMC for 
Howard CoselFs Speaking of Sports, 
plus Cadillac's John Daly and the Neivs. 
CBS reports a surge of fall auto busi- 
ness that includes Chevy News, more 
Ford road shows, Plymouth, Dodge, 
Chrysler, Oldsmobile and Rambler. 

New advertisers are also brighten- 
ing the radio net picture. In addition 
to the Cadillac purchase, ABC has in- 
troduced such accounts as Puritron 
Air Fresheners, Magda Ironing Boards 
and Angostura Bitters to Don Mc- 
NeiWs Breakfast Club. At CBS, Tootsie 
To)s is scheduling a Christmas satura- 
tion campaign. NBC has signed Auto 
Parts for AP mufflers. Mutual will 
carry Peter Paul's 40th anniversary 
promotion, a new use of network for a 
long time spot radio user. 

Established accounts, like Pepsi- 
Cola are pushing new marketing con- 
cepts. Beginning 17 September, Pepsi 
starts a four-network drive designed to 
reach 100,000,000 listeners in a 13- 
week period with a new Pepsi jingle. 
Referring to the song, advertising v. p. 
John Soughan said, "We can think of no 
more effective medium through which 
to present it than radio. Our decision 
to use all four networks was deter- 
mined by the fact that that's all the 
networks there are." 

Cost efficiency of net radio is be- 
lieved to be at an all-time high. In 
radio's heyday the Jack Benny show 
was figured to deliver approximately 
9 million homes for $40,000. Today's 
good radio buys, say network statisti- 
cians, are bettering these figures con- 
siderably — even without taking into 
account such modern added bonuses as 
out-of-home circulation. 

Better commercials are being pro- 
duced for net radio than heretofore. 
A few years ago, it was common prac- 
tice to use soundtracks from tv com- 
mercials. Now, according to the net- 
works, agencies are coming up with 
carefully produced commercials de- 
signed especially for radio. 

Stereophonic broadcasting in 
combination with tv is being scheduled 
this fall for the first time in network 
history. Plymouth has made the 
Wednesday night Lawrence Welk show 
stereo over ABC TV and ABC Radio 
in five cities — New York, Chicago, Los 



Angeles, Detroit, San Francisco. View- 
ers of the ABC TV show who live 
within transmission range of the five 
ABC Radio stations will be able to pick 
up and mix two entirely different 
sounds — one from tv, one from radio. 
With a two-microphone setup, there's a 
true "two-ear" stereo effect. Agency 
brass are watching this new develop- 
ment carefully. If it proves popular, a 
rash of radio/tv stereo may follow. Un- 
like stereo recordings, no special equip- 
ment is needed — just a regular radio 
and regular television set. 

New sources of income have startled 
even the networks themselves. While 
convenience products dominated new 
business in recent seasons, this year's 
big growth areas are recreation and 
home maintenance products. For ex- 
ample, NBC signed Alcoa to a satura- 
tion campaign next January for alumi- 
num boat hardware, Evinrude for an 
extensive schedule for its outboard 
motors, Rubberoid to push its home 
building supplies and the Edison Elec- 
tric Institute in an institutional cam- 
paign on the additional advantages of 
electricity for better living. ^ 



New net-local tie-ups 
gain in popularity 

Increasingly effective gambit in 
net radio buying is programing 
for local station follow-up busi- 
ness. 

As a result of Savings and Loan 
Foundation s network campaign 
on ABC (27-30 June) local sta- 
tion salesmen sold 2800 spots, 
according to reports received 
from 80 ABC stations. 

Trick was turned with a sales 
tool prepared by McCann E rick- 
son. Stations were supplied with 
names and addresses of local 
members of foundation. ABC 
alerted stations to new business 
possibilities. 

Similar follow-up techniques 
were used by NBC for Sterling 
Silversmith's Guild in July. Mu- 
tual' s network programing for 
T-Pak, a sausage casing, brought 
Mutual stations a grillful of 
orders from local hot dog packers. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Keys to better 

timebuyer-timeseller 

relationships 

^ Station Representative Robert E. Eastman offers 
sales road map for faster, clearer spot negotiations 

^ Defines 15 key areas where salesmen, stations 
can provide more efficient service to timebuyers 




i^ alesmanship today consists mainly 
of problem-solving. More than ever 
that's true in the air media where early 
novelty has worn off and efficiency 
now is the key consideration. 

This week Bob Eastman, head of his 
own Robert E. Eastman and Co. rep 
firm, drew up the following sales road- 
map for that most complex of air me- 
dia — spot. True, it was written by a 
man who has spent a lifetime in sales. 
But equally true, its value lies in East- 
man's ability to "plug into" the time- 
buyer's problems and necessities and 
describe the smoothest path. 

Here, then — at the start of a rousing 
new spot season — are 15 Keys to Bet- 
ter Timebuyer-Timeseller Results as 
Bob Eastman has defined them for his 
own salesmen and his clients. 

Spot radio and tv advertising require 
especially imaginative and capable 
salesmen. A rep or station salesman 
must draw upon his imagination to 
figure: 1) What will make my product 
most appealing to this customer? 2) 
What is the best approach and timing? 
3 I What will impel him to buy? 

This is what your customer will ex- 
pect of rou at the minimum. 



J KNOWLEDGE OF PRODUCT 

Too main salesmen of broadcastiiifi 
do not know enough about their prod- 
uct. Make it a point to know: 

a. Station programing 

b. Competitive programing 

c. Comparative facihties 

d. Rates — especially relating to 
packages 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



e. Competitive rates 

f. Audience characteristics 

g. Accounts using station effec- 
tively 

h. Nature of market 

i. General audience picture for all 
stations on all available surveys 

Facile use of this fundamental 
knowledge will make you "fast on 
your feet" with answers. Make notes 
— memorize those things you'll need 
most frequently. 

Moreover, the best salesmen I have 
known and worked with are extremely 
well-organized. A forgotten item or a 
neglected follow-up may mean a lost 
sale. Establish a system to cover the 
following: 

a. All pending business 

b. Ideas for follow-up 

c. Pending campaigns 

d. Pre-selling needs 

e. Account executives and client 
contacts to be made 

f. Status of all business in markets 

g. Switching plans 

Carefully kept and used records will 
add greatly to your efficiency and 
sales performance. 



iiMi TIMING 

There always is a best time to sell 
a customer. In many instances 9 a.m., 
by appointment, is ideal. The buyer is 
fresh, other problems of the day have 
not yet beset him. His mind is most 
receptive to the ideas you wish to 
impress upon him. 

But you cannot see all your pros- 
pects at 9 a.m., so you must apply this 
timing where it fits (probably for your 
most important and potentially produc- 
tive of business calls for the day). It 
bears repeating here that you must 
make calls — lots of them — but be sure 
they are carefully timed and well- 
prepared. 



THE RECEPTION ROOM 

Too often the reception room is 
jLised as a sort of club room. Here 
salesmen happily fraternize and read 
magazines. I don't mean to overlook 
the amenities completely, but the ef- 
fective salesman is the busy one and 
he is in that reception room for just 
one purpose — to get inside and get 



the order. Far too much highly valu- 
able time is wasted in reception rooms. 
Here is the proper reception room 
procedure : 

a. If you have to wait, use the time 
to review your presentation. 

b. Think of what you are going to 
say. Review in your mind the 
right kind of selling words to 
fit the customer. 

Use reception room times as part 
of your selling time. Don't waste it. 



PREPARATION 

Each sales presentation requires 
careful advance thought and work. 
Consider what this buyer is after and 
how you can best adapt your mer- 
chandise to be most appealing. It 
usually is advisable to have more than 
one plan in order to offer the buyer 
a choice. Study all the station data 
and select the substantiating material 
which will be most effective with this 
particular buyer. Frequently the sale 
is made in the preparation. One de- 
sirable method of preparation: 

a. Organize your thoughts and 
facts in outline. 

b. Put them on paper in letter 
form. 

c. Talk these with the buyer. 

d. Then leave the letter if it holds 
up in the discussion. 

e. Otherwise prepare another letter 
which better fits the results of 
the discussion and deliver it in 
person. Don't mail it or you 
miss a chance to review and get 
the order. 

f. If the sale is ready to close be- 
fore d. and e. are needed, close 
it and proceed to something else. 



IMAGERY 

Study the effect of words. The 
choice of the right word at the right 
time often will close a sale. Know 
v/hich words appeal to which buyers. 
Use positive words. 

There always is an idea — or several 
— which adds lustre to your mer- 
chandise. Use ideas extravagantly. 
You'll find that the more you use 
them, the more you will invent and 
your selling will become vastly more 
exciting and effective. There is nothing 
more powerful than an idea. 



IDEAL SALES SEQUENCE 

Many salesmen invariably open 
their solicitation with ratings or price. 
This is a serious error. 

Considerations other than numbers 
must be given precedence. Time and 
again you have read and heard state- 
ments from astute buyers regarding 
the importance they place on factors 
other than numbers. Take them at 
their word; they are sincere in their 
interest in information other than the 
factual data. Here is what I consider 
to be an ideal sales sequence: 

a. Open with an idea. 

b. Discuss the nature of station 
programing and appeal as it fits 
the product. 

c. Show proof that the station is 
selling merchandise. 

d. Present a plan or plans to sell 
for the client. 

e. Give statistical verification of 
the values involved. 

f. Cost-economy. 

Always advise the station regarding 
upcoming business. Several times a 
year, I'll guarantee you, the station 
manager will have a contributing idea 
or live next door to the influential 
broker. Advising the station well in 
advance is well worth the small effort. 
It pays off in additional orders. 



COVER INFLUENTIALS 

Most sales are influenced by several 
different people. It is the obligation 
of the salesman to know all of these 
people and wherever possible and 
practical to cover them. Here is the 
right way to cover influentials: 

a. Give the timebuyer the com- 
plete details. 

b. See the account executive and 
give him the story. 

c. Let the buyer know right away 
that you have seen the account 
executive. 

d. See the advertising manager and 
give him the story. 

e. Advise both timebuyer and ac- 
count executive that you have 
discussed the situation with the 
ad manager. 

Obviously this type of coverage 
must be used with discretion and when 
used, be sure to keep all the parties — 
especially the buyer — fully informed. 
Don't cross any wires or the fuse you 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



l)lo\v may be your own. 

Some salesmen go only to account 
executives or ad managers to protest 
the loss of business. This is the wrong 
way and should rarely, if ever, be 
done. Do your selling with the in- 
fluential before — not after — the order 
is placed. 



^■ 



PRE-SELLINC 



This is tremendously important. Too 
often in the sale of national spot 
broadcasting, when the buyer is going 
into 100 markets and must analyze 
and carefully screen 200, 300, or more 
stations, he can't find the time to sit 
still for a full scale pitch on every 
station. Furthermore, he is working up 
to midnight for several straight nights 
and is likely to be justifiably short 
with the salesman who hasn't been 
around for six months and now wishes 
to monopolize his time. 

Get your station story across before 
actual buying begins. Every time you 
hear a new sales angle on a station, 
mention it on all of your calls for 
several days until the thought has 
been well registered. 

Pre-selling takes advantage of the 
mails. From time to time, jot down 
a new piece of data or an idea in very 
brief form and mail it out to the 
people who should know it. They'll 
read it, and you'll be amazed how 
many will remember it at the right 
time. Pre-sell all the time. Encourage 
your stations to pre-sell, too, by taking 
advantage of logical advertising and 
promotion opportunities. 



*^t# THE GRANDSTAND PLAY 

This is an order-getting technique 
which can be used on certain oc- 
casions. Only good judgment will tell 
you when. 

There are many kinds of "grand- 
stand plays." But one which is most 
helpful in national spot selling is ask- 
ing the buyer if you may use his 
telephone collect. The purpose of the 
call is to serve the buyer better 
through bringing station management 
into the transaction in order to work 
out a schedule, or some other aspect, 
to fit the buyer's needs more closely. 



This extra effort and interest on the 
part of the seller and station will, if 
properly used, get additional orders. 

Recognition of other "grandstand 
plays" will come about for the sales- 
man who trains himself to be keenly 
aware of the dramatics in his situation 
and be alert for opportunities to apply 
them effectively. 



LEAVE A REASONABLE 
DOUBT 

A salesman's position requires that 
he constantly sell his merchandise. It 
is in complete contradiction to this re- 
sponsibility for a salesman ever to 
agree that another station is a better 
buy. Often, however, a salesman in a 
false attempt to be a "nice guy" or a 
"good loser" will only admit that the 
purchase of a competitive facility is a 
good buy. This is strictly taboo! 

I do not mean that the salesman 
should be overly dogmatic. However, 
he can leave a reasonable doubt by 
simply stating "you are the buyer and 
the final decision is yours" — or say 
nothing, but don't applaud the other 
purchase. 

Leave the buyer feeling that perhaps 
your product deserved more considera- 
tion. This helps pave the way for fu- 
ture sales. When you must lose a sale, 
never forget it and see to it that your 
future pre-selling repairs the situation 
in advance of the next transaction. 



11 



NEGATIVE SELLING 



No salesman or sales organization 
can prosper for long by trying to build 
up his product by tearing down that of 
another. It just doesn't work. As a 
matter of fact it inevitably is detri- 
mental to the person, organization, and 
product which tolerates negative sell- 
ing. 

Sell your own merchandise positive- 
ly. Present all the things good about 
your product and the reasons why it 
fits the buyer's needs. You can prop- 
erly express why it is "better than" — 
but be sure you use the right words at 
this point and don't trap yourself in- 
to an exposition of all the things 
wrong with the competition. 

Don't publicize the competition by 
talking about them or you may leave 
the impression of "methinks he pro- 
testeth too much." Negative selling 



hurts the industry. This internecine 
warfare can help other media. 

Make it a firm policy that you will 
not play tapes or show logs of how 
bad the competition is. No station is 
ever perfect and starting a witch hunt 
can cause great harm. There is too 
much of this being done in broadcast- 
ing, and it should be discontinued im- 
mediately. 



^ WHEN TO QUIT 
AND GO BACK 

Kinpiilln is essential to good selling. 

You've got to develop an awareness 
that tells you how the customer is re- 
acting. If you aren't getting across, 
and you can see that the buyer isn't 
with you at all, maybe it's a bad time 
of day for either you or him. Don't 
permit yourself to be heavy-handed and 
plod on with your pitch anyway. Don't 
quit on the piece of business, but quit 
for today, and then set a more oppor- 
tune time to go back. 



13 



DON'T LET CO 



Properly applied persistence is basic 
to all good selling. When a situation 
seems stacked against you, think and 
think some more. 

Turn your imagination loose. There 
always is another idea or approach 
which can convert what seem to be in- 
surmountable odds to an order. Talk 
it over with other salesmen in the com- 
pany, the sales manager, the station. 
Don't let go — dig and keep digging — 
you'll frequently find the answer. 
You'll get more orders. 

Always remember that good selling 
never is wasted, though frequently it 
will seem that the amount of thought, 
time, and salesmanship devoted to se- 
curing a relatively small piece of busi- 
ness is not worthwhile. 

This would be true if a strict cost 
accounting of commissions in relation 
to time spent were applied. However, 
all good selling is an investment. In- 
evitably the effort expended on a small 
order will lay the foundation for larg- 
er orders from the same buver. 



A, ^' HOW TO CLOSE SALE 

The "close" is the most misunder- 
stood aspect of selling. Asking for the 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



order is basic and should never be 
confused with begging for the order. 

The right and only way to close a 
sale is to start closing from your first 
thought, every word written and spo- 
ken. You are closing from the begin- 
ning. This is important to remember 
because if you should be deluded into 
a slow warmup, a more alert competi- 
tor will have the order while you're 
still warming up. 

Here's a tip on maintaining momen- 
tum in dealing with skeptics: Few buy- 
ers are willing to be pioneers; the fact 
that other well-known customers have 
bought your station is important. In 
your written and verbal selling, con- 
stantly use the endorsement-through- 
purchase of other clients. 



STATION SEQUENCE 

All representatives have stations of 
varying degrees of popularity. Also, 
all salesmen are eager to please the 
buyer. There is a constant temptation 
for the salesman to lead with his most 
attractive merchandise. Whenever pos- 
sible a salesman should plan his calls 
and pre-selling so that he is selling 
only one station at a time. 

Frequently, however, it becomes nec- 
essary for him to present and sell for 
several stations at one time. On these 
occasions it is very important for him 
to set up the proper station sequence 
of presentation. In his effort to please 
the buyer if he leads with the best fa- 
cility or highest ratings, all the rest of 
his merchandise may look pale by com- 
parison. Lead off with your toughest 
sale. The points you score on this one 
will pass on a strength to the others 
you are selling. 

Summary: 1) Know your product 
thoroughly. 2) Time your selling prop- 
erly. 3) Use the reception room for 
reviews. 4) Prepare every presenta- 
tion in advance. 5) Use ideas and 
imagery in selling. 6) Program your 
pitch in proper sequence. 7) Cover 
all the influentials. 8) Pre-sell your 
ideas whenever possible. 9) Don't 
neglect the "grandstand play." 10) 
Know when to quit, when to go back. 

11) Stay away from negative selling. 

12) Leave the buyer with a "reasonable 
doubt." 13) Don't give up. Persistence 
pays off. 14) Start "closings" at the 
beginning. 15) // possible, sell one 
station at a time, but if you can't, then 
lead off with your toughest sale. ^ 






\ 


^ 


1 


E^S ~" 


^m 


'^ 


^^^^ 


3 



md Northlich agency, Cincinnati, explai 
1, and J. L. Beck of Rainbow Cra 



PLAY-DOH: $3,000,000 SPOT TV WONDER 

"If you don't use tv to get distribu- 
tion for you, you're not making it do 
its maximum work for you," says v.p. 
Robinson. In building its campaign 
around participations in high-rated 
local children's shows, Play-Doh made 
certain that its stations knew exactly 
what its aims and ambitions were 
via a form known as a Station Promo- 
tion Report. According to John L. 
Beck, Play-Doh's sales promotion man- 
ager, the stations co-operated whole- 
heartedly in merchandising and pro- 
moting the product. 

Similarly, Play-Doh worked hard 
with program personalities. Each was 
scheduled for appearances at store 
openings, trade shows, even sales calls. 
"Thanks to one well-known person- 
ality," says McVickers, "we've sold one 
account $112,000 of Play-Doh this 
year." 

Play-Doh itself has developed from 
a commercial product once manufac- 
tured by President McVicker's father 
for cleaning wallpaper. Discovered al- 
most by accident, it built from a vol- 
ume of $23,000 in 1955 to $230,000 in 
1956. By 1957 McVicker decided the 
time was ripe for tv advertising. First 
step was a test-market operation in 
Evansville, Ind. with 10 spots a week 
for four weeks over WEHT. Later — 
because of excellent results — this was 
extended, and within less than four 
months the test developed $12,000 in 
business at wholesale prices. ^ 



A sales curve that's shot from less 
than $25,000 in 1955 to over $3 
million in 1958 is the proud record of 
brilliant, 27-year Joseph McVicker, 
president of Rainbow Crafts, Inc., 
Cincinnati, manufacturer of Play-Doh, 
a children's modeling material. 

McVicker himself is articulate about 
his success formula: 1) an improved 
and useful product; and 2) spot tv, 
used in ways that extract every pos- 
sible ounce of sales, advertising, and 
marketing help from the medium. 

This year Play-Doh is investing 
$150,000 in spot tv (90% of its total 
ad budget) in 41 markets on the basis 
of three major drives — winter, spring, 
and fall. Starting this month Play- 
Doh builds toward Christmas business 
( November and December are the 
biggest sales months in the toy field ) . 
Play-Doh also believes in post-Christ- 
mas advertising; it used a strong 
campaign in January and February 
to maintain jobber enthusiasm, and 
shelf space in toy departments, as well 
as to promote consumer sales. 

Actually Play-Doh, under the driving 
leadership of McVicker and John J. 
Robinson, v.p. for marketing, uses tv 
for five separate and distinct purposes: 

1. To introduce their product. 

2. To demonstrate it. 

3. To create consumer demand. 

4. To build distribution. 

5. To get shelf space. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




VIDEO 
TAPE 
STATUS 
REPORT 



Tv's revolutionary videotape: Part 2 



^ Probably no one is exploring deeper the potential of 
videotape than tv stations; here's how they're using it 
^ Biggest news of the moment; first eolor tape tele- 
cast from an individual station-WBTV, Charlotte, N. C. 



Like a brush fire out of controL it 
is hard to follow the spread of video- 
tape. At presstime ( 13 Sept.), SPONSOR 
received the following telegram: 

"Charlotte, N. C: The world's first 
television to be tape recorded and 
played back on the air in full color by 
a tv station was originated today by 
WBTV. The program, The Betty 
Freezor Show, was taped between 11 
and 11:30 a.m. on an RCA color 
videotape recorder and played back 
between 1 and 1:30 p.m. with perfect 
sound and picture quality. The show 
featured a short talk by Charles H. 
Crutchfield, executive vice president 
and general manager of Jefferson 
Standard Broadcasting Co. . . . The 
videotape recorder installation which 
cost in excess of $100,000 enables 
WBTV to record either color or black 
and white programs, network or local 
. . . (it) stands seven feet high and 
is 13 feet wide . . . standard reel 
contains enough tape for 64 minutes 
of programing. . . . WBTV the first 
tv station in nation to become com- 
pletely equipped with all known means 
of color programing. . . ." 

TTie WBTV recorder is the seventh 
color/b&w prototype to be placed by 
RCa! first to a local station. Four 
went to NBC TV center in Burbank, 
Calif., in April: two have just been 
delivered to the NBC TV tape center 



that will go into operation in N. Y. 
this fall. Chief difference between 
RCA and Ampex recorders: RCA 
builds for color, removal of rack pro- 
duces b&w; Ampex builds for b&w, 
addition of a color accessor)- unit 
produces color. 

First two such color accessory units 
by Ampex are now on their way to 
CBS TV City on the Coast. Still 
another first in the tape story was 
the delivery this week of the first new 
tape splicer by Ampex (cost $780) 
to KPRC, Houston. 

For KPRC, the splicer kit arrives in 
the nick of time; for sponsor Humble 
Oil, KPRC General Manager Jack 
Harrison and staff have set out on 
perhaps the most ambitious editing 
of videotape to date. Each Saturday 
this fall, they will tape the Southwest 
conference football game of the week, 
edit it to exactly one hour (yet include 
every play) and on Sunday from 5 to 
6 p.m. will air it as well as feed it live 
to 22 other tv stations. Humble Oil. 
sponsor on the full "football network" 
has already pre-taped more than a 
score of commercials. 

Thus each day videotape takes a new 
step, leading advertisers and broad- 
casters on to new opportunities, spon- 
sor has attempted to retrace some of 
these steps with the following coast- 
lo-coast rundown of how a number of 




first colortape -liow v 
New RCA recorder i- dieeked b> Joseph 
Bryan, president Jefferson Standard Bcstg. 
and Tom Howard, v.p. 



Sah". tool: WFIl '1 \ . Philadelphia, per- 
sondlitic- take part in tape show for agency' 
top brd-s to promote new videotape equip- 
ment. Show combined live and tape, asked 
admen to gue^- wliiih was which 




13 SEPTEMBKR 1958 



1 




Special event 



stations and local clients 
tape in tv. 

KRLD-TV, DaUas: Tape licked a 
problem in commercials for local auto 
accounts! Because of limited studio 
space, it had been impossible to show 
more than one model car in a live 
commercial; since tape, a number of 
cars can be "shot" ahead of air time, 
then played back in the one strip of 
tape. Religious programing had been 
another problem since local pastors 
could scarcely desert their pulpits on 
Sundays to work "live" at studio. 
With tape, the ministers now record 
during the week, and the programs are 
aired at a logical time — Sunday. As 
for problems of the tape operation it- 
'self, they are (1) editing and (2) how 
to store satisfactorily ^pots and short 
program segments. 

KENS-TV, San Antonio: Says Gen- 
eral Manager Albert Johnson, "Local 
agencies are enthusiastic about our 
tape, and several clients are using it 
regularly for commercials. The Wyatt 
Agency likes it for their client, San 
Antonio Savings & Loan, both for 
convenience and quality control in tv 
commercials. Piggly Wiggly Stores 
through the Notzen Agency also uses 
our tape facilities regularly." KENS 
. uses tape for agency presentations, 
for weekday pre-taping of week-end 
shows. "At present," says Johnson, 
"we find tape a tremendous tool 
rather than a big saving." 



Who buys videotape recorders and why 

QUESTION #1— Who made the decision in the station to make the 
purchase of Videotape Recorder(s)? 

1. Management _ - 20 

2. Station Manager - 11 

3. Owner 6 

4. V.P. of Engineering 3 

5. Chief Engineer ^ -^ 3 

6. Otfier _ - __ - - 1 

TOTAL 44 

QUESTION #2 — What were his indicated reasons for making the 
purchase? 

1. Save Operating Personnel — 11 

2. No Specific Reason 8 

3. Reduce Overtime 5 

4. Experimental Operation 3 

5. Make Syndicated Programs 3 

6. Make Local Spots 3 

7. Better Efficiency 2 

8. Multiple Station Program Exchange 2 

9. Network Delay by Station 1 
10. Remote Truck Facility 1 

TOTAL 39 

QUESTION #3 — How is the station using its recorder(s)? 

1. Program Delay (by Station) 

a. Local 19 

b. Netwoik 2 

2. Making Spoi ( nniNHHiiK 9 

3. Recorder Net \n ln>.tdllMl 4 

4. Syndicated Shows 1 

5. Remote Tiuck Facility 1 

6. Recorder Not Actually Required 1 

TOTAL 37 

QUESTION #4 — Do you know whether they have been able to reduce 
personnel? 

1. Same Personnel/Overtime 20 

2. Less Personnel/Overtime 7 

3. More Personnel/Overtime 6 

4. No Answer at this Time 4 

TOTAL 37 

\UTE: In July, one of the biggest firms in broadcasting conducted a survey of stations 
that liave I'ideolape recorders. Above are the results. .4nswers based on station's answer- 
ing, not on number of recorders. Networks not included in lurrcv. Totals not equal 
because of mullif>le answers to same questions. Resfmndcnts include four closed-circuit 



WFLA-TV Tampa: Since this outlet 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



serves, besides Tampa, both St. 
Petersburg and Clearwater, it is 
finding its new videotape facilities 
valuable in doing remote commercials 
in those outside areas. Last month, a 
public service program was taped at 
noon, aired at 5 p.m. A severe elec- 
trical storm, however, interrupted 
service in the area most concerned 
with the event. So the next morning 
\^ FLA replayed the tape for the bene- 
fit of those who had missed it. 

Vt RAL-TV, Raleigh, N.C.: This out 
let's recorder has only been in about 
a month, but it lost no time in pro- 
moting it to clients. A full-dress 
demonstration was put on for ad- 
vertising agency executives from 
North Carolina, Virginia, and Wash- 
ington. This "clinic" for admen in- 
cluded actual rehearsal and taping of 
commercials; at one point the admen 
themselves "taped and played back." 

WFIL-TV, Philadelphia: To pro 

mote its new tape facilities, WFIL 
aired a contest for agency presidents, 
vice presidents and account execs; The 
program comprised sections in both 
live and tape; admen had to guess 
which was which. Winner was John 
Kelly, president of Kelly Associates, 
Phila. Promotion for the viewing 
public comprised a half-hour all-tape 
show. The Miracle of Videotape; it 
showed the studio facilities, included 
tapes of a Phillies ball game, featured 
personality Dick Clark and others. 
Dick Clark and tape solved a problem 
for College Type Clothes which 
wanted to schedule commercials just 
before schools open; trouble was 
Clark who was to star in them would 



be on vacation at that time. Tape 
made it possible for Clark to do the 
commercials before he left. 

KDKA-TV Pittsburgh: Management 
considers tape for tv "second only in 
importance to the development of the 
image orthicon." Is using its equip- 
ment to open up "dead" studio time 
for live programing. Every day, 
KDKA records portions of its live 
schedule, plays them back the same 
day. During net time, for example, 
it may tape a special event for airing 
in the late evening. It pre-records 
station-break announcements with 
thematic treatment for personality 
and image effect. Programs destined 
for kine are taped and shipped to net 
for kine recording, thereby avoiding 
transmission line costs. As with so 
many other outlets equipped for tape, 
KDKA is finding it a useful sales tool 
for auditions and sales presentations 
to advertisers. Clients using baseball 
game commercials are effecting a 
saving with tape announcements; 
they permit the switch from film to 
live techniques at substantially less 
cost. KDKA has entered syndication 
by taping two of its major live pro- 
grams: Slimnastic (an exercise for- 
mat) and KD County Fair (country 
music ) . 

WBZ-TV, Boston: First crack out of 
the box, this station taped its monthly 
program Storyville, a jazz show 
featuring top stars and aired at 10:30 
p.m. The airing hour had never been 
compatible with the schedules of the 
top jazz talent they starred, but since 
tape, they get the artists together on 
an afternoon, rehearse and tape it. 



has equipped this prowlint; 
ack to station Ampex 




At WBZ, several clients regularly use 
tape for commercials. Slumberland 
Mattress Co. records all commercials 
for a week in one afternoon. A side- 
light on Slumberland Mattress, use of 
tape is that their weather girl, Jane 
Day, must remember what dress to 
wear each night to match the one 
she wore in the pre-taped commercial. 

WJZ-TV, Baltimore: A local adver- 
tiser that had previously been using 
film commercials, moved its ad budget 
over to WJZ after a demonstration of 
videotape, now tapes its commercials. 
The same station used a closed-circuit 
presentation to a major department 
store, pointed up the flexibility and 
possibilities of tape to tell an ad- 
vertising message; result: the depart- 
ment store is now a WJZ client and 
is using tape. One of the outstanding 
applications of tape to WJZ program- 
ing is speedy station wagon adapta- 
tion of a mobile (see picture). Other 
examples are: A political candidate 
was able to tape his pitch; now it is 
aired while he is out stumping the 
slate with personal appearances. Paul 
Richards, manager for the Baltimore 
Orioles does a sports show for WJZ; 
tape has enabled him to appear on tv 
at the same time he is away with the 
team or is playing on the field. 

KNXT, Los Angeles: Buys serv- 
ices of CBS TV City tape facilities to 
pre-record morning shows (7 to 9 
a.m.) and week-end shows. Feeds 
taped excerpts of national news into 
local newscasts. Following telecasts 
of horse races, replays action via tape 
for air analysis; plans similar play- 
backs of highlights or controversial 
parts of other sports events. 

KABC-TV, Los Angeles: Taping two 
live shows {Traffic Court, Stars of 
Jazz) available to o&o's in New York 
and Chicago. Has taped Dodge 
(Grant Adv.) commercial which was 
rolled into a N.Y.-originated Lawrence 
Welk Show. 

KRCA, Los Angeles: Pre-records 
week-end programs during week. 
"The pressure from advertisers for 
t?pe commercials is on," says a 
spokesman. Among clients using tape 
are Miles California Co. and All- 
State Carpet Co. Former, through 
\ Please turn to page 71) 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Jinglei) 

Art Mai 



Collaborating on the Maola Milk commercial t 
. vocalists from the Ray Charles Singers, and Hai 



r) Phil Davis, of Phil Davis Musical Enterprises, N.Y.; Dottie Evans and 
is; president of Maola's agency. Harry Gianaris & Assoc, Charleston, S. C. 



What Maola did with regional radio 



^ Maola Golden Guernsey milk is a premium-priced 
product selling at 2c a quart more than regular milk 

^ When most dairies turned to promoting lower cost 
items, Maola used a radio jingle to up G-G sales 45% 



^^ne of the makeshift marketing pat- 
terns that developed during last 
spring's recession was that of dairy 
companies switching emphasis from 
premium-priced high-butterfat milk to 
the lower-priced, low-fat product. The 
Maola Milk & Ice Cream Co., of New 
Bern, N. C, however, reversed the 
trend and, with a campaign spearhead- 
ed by regional radio, increased sales of 
its premium-priced Golden Guernsey 
milk by 4.5% over 1957. 

Maola is fairly typical of thousands 
of companies across the U.S. Its mar- 
keting area covers 30 counties; its ad- 
vertising budget (much of which goes 
into point-of-sale pieces, truck cards, 
'school annuals) runs between S50,000 
and $75,000. Its approach to the "soft 
economy" of April was not so typical. 

Maola hiked its ad budget 10% over 
the year before to $75,000. General 
Manager Kenneth G. Reesman gave his 
agency, Harry Gianaris & Assoc, 



Charleston, S. C, an okay to push 
Golden Guernsey milk, which sells at 
the premium price of 2«' per quart 
above prices of the popular homogen- 
ized milks. Gianaris reasoned that 
spearheading a campaign with the top 
quality product will carry the rest of 
the product line with it. Maola has 
more than 100 products. 

Of its ad budget for the drive. Maola 
invested about 65% in broadcast me- 
dia, the lion's share to radio. A total 
of 12 stations were used. In primary 
markets through the 30-county area, 
schedules called for 50 spots a week; 
in secondary areas, 20 spots a week. 
They were slotted between 7 a.m. and 
6 p.m. with heaviest concentration on 
the "food days," Wednesday, Thurs- 
day. Friday. Three tv outlets and 16 
newspapers supplemented the radio 
push. 

Until this time. Maola had felt that 
jingles were for the sponsors with $1- 



million budgets, but when the agency 
recommended one for the campaign, 
Reesman gave them another green 
light. Phil Davis Musical Enterprises, 
of New York, producer of commercials 
for such national accounts as Gillette, 
Johnson Wax, Camay Soap, Campbell's 
Soup and Bell Telephone, was called 
in. Result: e.t.'s of a fresh and 
bouncy tune by two vocalists from Ray 
Charles Singers I frequent stars on the 
Ferry Como Show) and announce- 
ments by Charlie Stark (well-known 
for his commercials on Kraft Televi- 
sion Theater). 

By July, the 45% increase of Golden 
Guernsey sales put that product's pro- 
duction so far behind demand that 
plans for a fall flight for it had to be 
dropped; but not the air time. That 
will still be used to plug a new product. 
Meanwhile the jingle commercials go 
on. Maola ice cream got the big play 
this summer. 

"When you hear the commercial be- 
ing whistled by kids," says Reesman, 
"and see the sales figures continue to 
climb even three months after the big 
push is over, you know something's 
working hard for you. In this instance, 
we know it's the combination of a top- 
notch jingle and the astute use of satu- 
ration radio on a bold basis." ^ 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



$8 Million less for specs (so far) 



Thou-h llu- dollar output for 1958-59 specials is runnin- behind the prior sea- 
son it ill will account for a heftv hunk of business. Here's the situation: 

• Last year, at this time, a total of $37.8 million was committed for specials, 
with an average time-talent cost of $323,000 apiece; this year the figures are 
$29.1 million and $318,000. 

• Last year the total number of specials in the bag was ll<; so lar this year. 
it"s 911 •> (see chart below I . 

• Las't year the line-up included 14 musicals, 17 comedy-variety, 34 straight 
dramas, and 13 science-documentaries; this year the format numbers, 19, 19y2, 
29. and 8 respectively. ti n n r n 

Unsold specials on CBS TV. at ,..csMinie. include: For Whom The Bell Tolls, 
Treasure Island, one-quarter of WonJcrjul Tnnn. the Nutcracker Ballet, and the 
Philharmonic concerts. NBC TV still has to u.iioad the two Mary Martin Easter 
day shows, two Dean Martin programs, the remaining 41/0 hours of Jerry Lewis, 
and the Emmy Awards. .„ . , • . 

However, the networks are still confident that the buying will pick up, witli 
these prospects in the horizon: Texaco, Max Factor, Frigidaire and General 
Motors institutional. And Pontiac and Oldsmobile are expected to add to what 
they've got. ^^ 

Box score of web specials, 1958-59 



SPONSOR 


PROGRAM (NETWORK) 


NO. 
SHOWS 


TOTAL 
TIME-TALENT COST 


Academy of Arts 
and Sciences 


Oscar Awards (NBC TV) 




§450,000 


Aluminium Ltd., Union 
Carbide* 


Omnibus (NBC TV) 


15 


2,400,000 


Bell Telephone 


Science— Musicals (NBC TVl 




2,700.000 


Brecit, Hill Bros., 
National Dairy 


Shirley Temple's Storybook 
(NBC TV) 




1,600,000 


Buick 


Bob Hope (NBC TV) 




3,400,000 


Chrysler 


Fred Astaire (NBC TV) 




780,000 


Deico 


Lowell Thomas (CBS TV) 




900,000 


DuPont 


Sh.iwof Month (CBS TV) 




4,200,000 


Hallmark 


Hall of Fame (NBC TV) 




2,100,000 


Liggett & Myers 


I'ie.1 Piper (NBC TV) 




230,000 


Lincoln 


Concerts (unsettled) 




620,000 


Oldsmobile 


Bing Crosby (ABC TV) 




6.S0,000 


Phiico 


Miss America (CBS TV) 




220,000 


Pontiac 


Variety (CBS TV; NBC TV) 




2,100,000 


Rexali 


Story Books (NBC TV) 




1.700.000 


Sheafter Pen 


Story Books (CBS TV) 




750.000 


Timexi 


Jazz (CBS TV) 

Jerry Lfwis (NBC TV) 


l'/2 


1.275,000 
510,000 


Westclox, Carling Brew 


Wonderful Town (CBS TVl 




350.000 


Westinghouse 


Ball-Arnaz (CBS TVl 




2.150.000 


TOTAL 




91'/2 


$29,085,000 







111(1 drabs of post-'48 product, such as 
'ash li\ M^ht, are continually opening 
(11 lliiui^h the majors are holding out 

CONSERVAT/ON MEASUM 

Shortage o 



N 



ow that Hollywood has just about 
turned off the feature-film faucet on 
the one hand, and more network day- 
time programing is filling choice hours 
on the others, what's the status of fea- 
ture film? 

Will the supply start to get skimpy? 
Will advertiser interest wear thin be- 
cause of time and quality considera- 
tions? 

Right off, the answer to both ques- 
tions currently is No. In detailed evi- 
dence of that, SPONSOR this week 
checked the seven stations in the New 
York area — the country's No. 1 mar- 
ket-place for feature product — and this 
cozy situation is apparent: 

• Stations strong in film backlog can 
program premium features for another 
six years by spreading top shows 
throughout the year. 

• Stations that don't have so big a 
premium backlog will take the best 
pickings after the top stations are 
finished with them— to hit a still large 
and untouched audience. 

• There is still some pre-'48 product 
to he released (Columbia Universal 
especially). 

It's obvious that feature film pro- 
graming has worn its years (ofttimes 
ten I well. No drop in ratings has yet 
occurred; they still are fairly consis- 
tent. So practically every New York 
station boasts at least one show sold 
(,ul for the first week this fall and im- 



_ 



13 SEPTEMBER 19.58 




Repetition of good product adds a large amount of mileage to the life Thematic grouping not only stretches a limited amount of film 
of features. Humphrey Bogart-Kathryn Hepburn drama, African Queen but can renew advertiser and viewer excitement as well. A good ex 
(above), has been seen as many as 12 times in the New York market ample: A Shock group, with thrillers such as Bride of Frankensleir 

'.I ABOVB) SHOW WHY . . . 

*ost-'48's won't stymie feature films 



^ With new supplies cut ofif indefinitely, backlogs are big 
enough to keep broadcasters— advertisers— going for years 
^ New York, No. 1 marketplace for feature film, shows a 
steady gain. A status report on its reservoir and sponsors 



pressive sponsor lists for other shows. 

What kind of advertisers are buy- 
ing? 

Generally, the roster compares fav- 
orably with TvB's list of top spot ad- 
vertisers, nor does it vary much be- 
tween daytime and evening. For in- 
stance: 

A typical week of WCBS-TV's Early 
Show (5:15 p.m.) would include these 
advertisers: Procter & Gamble. Iin- 
perial Margarine, Best Foods. Robert 
Hall, Lever, L&M, Piel's, TV Guide, 
Peter Paul, Raleigh, Bromo Selzer. In- 
ternational Latex. 

CBS TV's Late Late Shotv (1 a.m. I 
for the same week: International Latex. 
Polident, Carter's Liver Pills, Schick, 
Dristan, Lestoil, Bromo Seltzer, Knick- 
erbocker Beer, Zest, Schaefer Beer, 
Pledge Wax. 

And WOR-TV's current line-up for 
its mid-evening Million Dollar Movie 
runs like this: R. J. Reynolds, New 
York Telephone Co., Best Foods, 
Bromo Seltzer, Anahist, Helena Ruben- 
stein, Del Monte Food Products. 

Within the film libraries of New 



York's seven stations lies every feature 
that's been made available to television. 
You'll find 85 different iiiovies (several 
with multiple runs weekly) programed 
among them each week, in every format 
and at every hour. Yet so vast is the 
filin supply that every station in the 
market can place a good deal of em- 
phasis on its feature programing. 

As for the current mathematics of 
the supply situation, this is how they 
work out. 

• WCBS-TV: Its library of 2,L50 
films comprises 700 Paramount pic- 
tures (none have been broadcast) ; 723 
MGM features (about half have been 
shown) ; 287 Warner Bros.: 33 United 
Artists post — '48 releases; 128 Colum- 
bias; and 32 Universals (half of which 
have been shown at least once) ; and 
197 miscellaneous films from other 
packages. 

With this kind of stockpile, WCBS- 
TV officials estimate they can keep 
going at their current rate of 1,200 
features a year imtil all leases expire — 
about six years. 

Advertiser-wise, the station has few 



problems for fall. Its Early and Late 
Shows and Picture for a Sunday After- 
noon already are sold out; its Late, 
Late Show is sold out on three nights. 

• WRCA-TV: Although the live 
Jack Paar show takes a chunk out of 
what most stations consider prime 
feature viewing hours, WRCA-TV still 
manages 10 programs of features 
weekly (5 p.m. Monday through Sat- 
urday; two features each, Saturday and 
Sunday evenings). 

Station officials estimate almost 75'^'^ 
of its features still haven't been run 
for the first time. Included in the 
WRCA-TV library are 140 Republic 
films; 74 of the new United Artists 
releases; 22 RKO's; 38 from 20th 
Century; and 13 from Columbia; plus 
some from independent sources. 

• WABC-TV: Thematic program- 
ing with Screen Gems' Shock packages 
takes care of what might otherwise 
present a supply problem. During this 
past season, the station aired all of its 
original Shock package of 52 films. 
Another run-through is due this year. 
In addition the station will incorporate 
another 20 called Son of Shock. With 
two of these pictures running each 
week (at 11:15 p.m.), WABC-TV 
officials figure they are good for at 
least this year. (Advertisers apparently 
feel just as secure; the program is 
about 60% sold for the fall season.) 

The network's new stress this fall on 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



daytime piograuiing will take some 
pressure olT oiW ABC-TVs feature 
library. But there undoubtedly will be 
at least one film scheduled each morn- 
ing. 

• WOR-TV: A strong feature film 
station, WOR-TV has a solid backlog 
of 1.400 movies, about half of which 
have been shown at least once. In- 
cluded in the library are the original 
Matty Fox package of 700 RKO fea- 
tures and 700 from miscellaneous 
packages. 

The biggest single block of feature 
programing is WOR-TV's Million Dol- 
lar Movie. higWighting one feature 



each week. Of the total library, only 
350 have been deemed of Million Dol- 
l^7ar Movie caliper. And' of these, 200 
have been aired over the four-year life 
of the program. At the current rate of 
50 a year, the station can go for at least 
three years on present supplies. 

The rest of the library will be divided 
up among three new feature programs 
planned for fall. In addition, the sta- 
tion schedules two thematic feature 
groups weekly, Gene Autry (56 films), 
stripped daily; and Roy Rogers (67 
films), on Saturdays and Sundays. 

All but two sponsorships have been 
signed for the fall Million Dollar 



NEW YORK'S CROP OF TV FEATURE FILMS 









^ 


,,,,,||,,,|,„,M,||„ 




llllllllllllllllll'llllllll 1 


llllllllllllllllllllll 


lllllllillllllli 


l'll!!lllll!l!i!"'-' 




PACKAGE 


WCBS-TV 


WRCA-TV 


WOR-TV 


IVNTA-TV 


WABC-TV 


WABD 


WPIX 


rOTAL 3 




MGM 


723 














723 




Paramount 


700 














700 




Warners 


287 




26 


26 




120 




459 




Columbia- 
Universal 


160 


13 






123 


100 




396 




2Wh Century 


50 


38 




102 






52 


242^ 




RKO 




22 


700 


30 




30 




782 




United Artist 


33 


74 








40 




147 




Republic 




140 












140 




Miscellaneous 


197 




674 


8 


50 


110 


164 


1093 




TOTAL 


2150 


287 


1400 


166 


173 


400 


216 


4792 ~ 




Approximate 
^ number aired 
= at least once 


400 


200 

i 


600 


100 


153 


400 


216 

III 1 


2069 1 

1 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlP 






iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 













Movies, says WOR-TV, and the roster 
is expected to ;be full bv the time the 
first show kicks off. 

• WPIX: Other New York sta- 
tions might compare themselves to 
Broadway theaters; WPIX likes to 
think of itself as the smaller "art" 
house. The station doesn't attempt to 
compete on size of original library; 
instead it takes the pick of re-runs 
(both foreign and domestic). All of 
its 216 films have been run between 
18 and 20 times. 

Since the station has invested a good 
deal in first-run syndication for fall, 
it's concentrating its selling in these 
half-hour segments. The eight feature 
programs themselves are not heavily 
sold. 

• WABD: Like WPIX. WABD 
doesn't concentrate on the first-run 
product, even though it programs fea- 
tures during prime hours three eve- 
nings a week. I Other evenings are 
devoted to syndicated half hours.) 
Station officials take an approach sim- 
ilar to those at WPIX, state "After 
Broadway, films always go into the 
neighborhoods. We're a neighbor- 
hood." Consequently, WABD has col- 
lected most of its 400-film stockpile 
from other stations in the market. 

Its advertiser list for fall, while not 
complete, contains what one executive 
terms "a healthy mixture of local and 
national sponsors." 

• WNTA: Looking for more prod- 
uct, but has great plans and impressive 
list of first year advertisers. That about 
sums up WNTA-TVs status on feature 
films. 

Its product: a 166-film library, in- 
cluding 102 20th Century features 
(mostly already shown at least once) ; 
30 RKO-Bank of America releases; 
eight Playhouse 90 shows (six already 
have been aired) ; and 26 new releases 
of pre-'48 Warner Bros. (AAP). 

The plans: 13 different feature 
segments weekly, including film sched- 
uling during prime hours every eve- 
ning. The station probably will use a 
minimum of 10 films a week, and will 
be on the lookout for more film after 
the fall season. 

The advertisers : Station officials say 
Movie Night, a continuous movie shown 
three times weekly, is completely sold 
out, with such advertisers as Colgate, 
Norge, Dristan, Anahist, Con-Edison 
and Newport Cigarettes. ^ 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



THE 3070 U. S. COUNTIES 

IN ARF TV SET COUNT NO. 3 



March 1958 



5holcl4 



lists complete county-by-county data on tv households 
t iinpresslvenewindustry -fflnanceds 



^Jublished this week by the Advertising Research Founda- 
tion is its third comprehensive estimate of tv penetra- 
tion in U. S. homes throughout the country. 

Because of the importance of these figures to the entire 
industry, SPONSOR is publishing on this and 10 subsequent 
pages the complete county-by-county breakdown of tv house- 
holds as shown by ARF. 

As of March 1958, when the study was made, ARF esti- 
mates 42,400,000 tv households out of a total of 50,.540,000 
— an increase of 19.73% as compares with the 35,495,000 
tv households shown in ARF tv set count No. 2. made in 
March 1956. 

ARF. a non-profit organization whose directors include 
outstanding leaders among advertisers, agencies, media and 
research men, prepared the study at the request and expense 



of the three networks, NAB, and TvB. 

The estimates have been arrived at by combining two 
basic sources — the Census Bureau's Current Population 
Survey and county data developed independently by A. C. 
Nielsen Co. — according to complex research and statistical 
formulas worked out and approved by leaders in the re- 
search field. 

The figures shown here represent, of course, highly edu- 
cated estimates rather than actual door to door set counts. 
But SPONSOR believes they will have great and continuing 
value to timebuyers, media men and station owners every- 
where. They are certain to be accepted as standards for 
the industry, and as a base for projecting tv home growth 
until the next computation of authoritative figures, as an 
im|)ortant guide to all timebuying operations. ^ 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



ALABAMA 

AUTAUGA 

BALDWIN 

BARBOUB 

BIBB 

BLOUNT 


829,500 71 589 

4.100 SO 2 

eisoo 47 a 
eleoo -n 4 


250 
030 
08O 
650 


BULLOCK 

BI-TI.EK 

CllAMISKKS 


s.soo .-.3 1 

24!2O0 75 If 


40O 


(.UOC-l'AW 

CLAY 
CLEBURNE 


6,100 CO 3 
S'.IM 49 2 
2',700 fiS 1 


990 
660 


COFFBa; 
tOLBERT 
CONECUH 

COVINGTON 


n>0O 49' 5 
4.300 49 2 

9:200 52 4 


380 


CREN.SHAW 

DALE 
DALLAS 
DB KALB 


4,300 56 2 
5;200 54 2 
ll!0O0 57 6 


150 
560 


ELMORE 


7,400 62 4 


600 
610 



l.TOWAH 


28.300 


74 


21,000 


IWYK-ITE _ 


fi'.Joo 


5(i 


siaso 










HALif" 


liZ 


« 


1.520 








1.860 


MorSTON 


13,600 


64 






8.600 


58 


5.030 








155,740 




3,500 


59 


2,080 










LAWKKNCE 


6.000 


58 


3,460 




11,200 


62 


6,890 








4,960 


LOWNDES 


3,500 


49 


r.730 










M.VDISON 


22.600 




13.560 




6,800 




3.450 


M'u"sVr\LL 


12,100 


64 


3,090 
7.700 
















2,530 






83 


38,250 


^fORGAN 


^4'l00 


58 


10.990 
2.390 


PICKENS 








PIKE 


7.200 


55 


3,990 


RANDOLPH 


4,900 


58 


2.840 



RUSSELL 




67 7 


420 










SHELBY 




83 6 


3H0 




5.100 






TALLADEGA 






150 


TALL.\POOSA 






50O 


TUSCALOOSA 




75 18 




WALKER 






440 




3.400 






WILC-OX 


4,800 


47 2 


240 


WINSTON 


3. 


54 r 


9€0 



APACHE 


6.000 






280 


COCHISE 


13.800 






42(> 




8.,-)00 








GILA 








860 




3,300 


51 


1 




GREENLEE 


3.800 


51 






MARICOPA 








530 




2,300 


38 






NAVAJO 






60 


050 


PINAL 


15.800 


83 


13 


040 










580 


YAVAPAI 


13:300 


68 


3 


250 
050 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 






NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



CONNECTICUT 



HKADLBY 
lALHOUX 
I ARROU. 



RIVERSIDE 88.21 

SACRAMENTO 135, 1( 

SAN BENITO 4,2( 

S.\N BERNABDINO 143. 5( 



HAUTrORI) 
LITCHFIELD 
MIDDLESEX 
NEW HAVEN 
NEW LONDON 



LITLE RIVER 



SHASTA 
SIERRA 
SISKIYOU 



DIS. OF COLUMBIA 



GILCHRIST 

GLADES 

GULF 



INDIAN RIVER 
.TACKSON 
.IBFFERSGN 
LAFAYETTE 



2,100 
14,690 
65.080 



CALIFORNIA 



LA PLATA 



.MOFFAT 

.MON-TEZUIIA 

.MONTROSE 



2.800 
2,000 
4,800 



ST. LUCIE 
SANTA ROSA 
SARASOTA 
SEMINOLE 



12.500 
1,200 
66.600 



10.220 
2.990 
7,910 
760 

54.700 
3.070 

47.250 



6.760 
4.650 
3,670 



HI-.MBOLDT 



25.710 
13.140 
2.170 



LAKE 

LA.SSEN 

U)S ANOBLES 



APPLING 
ATKINSON 
BACON 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



•orgia (continued) 



BARTOW 


7,000 












1,880 


BEHIRIEN 




50 


1,510 




39,800 


74 


29.560 


BLECKLEY 


2,100 






BRANTLEY 






720 


BROOKS 


3,600 










58 


sro 








3.030 


BURKE 


5.400 


54 


2.900 




2,200 




1.690 


CALHOUN 


2,000 


50 


1.000 














53 


950 


CARROLL 


8,.5O0 




7.140 




4,500 




3,440 


CH.\RLTON 








CHATHAM 


51.300 


83 


42,640 


CHATTAHOOCHEE 


1.800 




1.250 


CHATOOGA 


5,400 


75 




CLARKE 


iijoo 


72 


8.030 



CLAYTON 

CLINCH 

COBB 



COLUMBIA 

COOK 

COWETA 



FORSYTH 
FRANKLIN 

FULTON 



GILMER 
GLASCOCK 

GLYNN 



HABERSHAM 

HAU^ 

HANCOCK 



•TACKSON 
.TASPER 
.1EFF DAVIS 



2'i,2a0 
6 100 
9.300 



18.700 
2.700 
3,100 



7.740 
3,590 
2,120 



OGLETHORPE 






220 


FATT-DIXO 


2.700 




290 










PICKENS 


2.100 




670 






51 1 












POLK 






960 


PULASKI 


2,000 


fil 1 


2ro 





1,700 




1.130 


RANDOLPH 




5fi 


1.580 


RICHMOND 


44.600 






ROCKDALE 


2.200 


84 


1.849 


SCHLEY 


800 




490 


SCREVEN 


4,100 


54 


2.200 


SEMINOLE 






880 


SPALDING 


8,800 


89 


7.850 




4,900 




3,260 


STEWART 


2.100 




1,280 


SUMTER 


6.200 








1.800 




1.200 


TALIAFERRO 






610 




3.400 


52 


1,780 


TAYLOR 


2.100 


61 


1.280 


TELFAIR 




50 


1,290 


TERRELL 






1.700 


THOMAS 






5.280 


TIFT 






3.340 


TOOMBS 


4.200 


52 











970 


UPSON 


1 1:800 


% 


slsio 


WALTON 






3.350 




9,000 














WASHINGTON 




52 


2,380 


WAYNE 


3,500 













790 


WHITFIELD 


10,.300 




8,900 








1.270 


WILKES 






r,830 




2,200 


52 




WORTH 






2,110 


IDAHO 










182.600 


72 


130.940 


Idams 


25,400 


?s 


520 


BANNOCK 














1.060 


BENEWAH 


1,400 


81 


I,r40 


BINGHAM 






5,250 




1,400 






BOISE 




63 


380 


BONNER 








BON-NEVILLE 


10,800 


84 


9.070 






79 




BUTTE 




en 


480 








180 


CANYON 


17,900 




12,744) 






62 


r,3fO 




3.900 




2.390 


CLARK 








CLEARWATER 






1.470 


CUSTER 










3,300 




2.390 


FRANKLIN 


2,400 






FREMONT 






1.720 
















1,950 


IDAHO 


3,100 


52 




.JEFFERSON 
















KOOTENAI 






7,r90 




6,900 


63 





CLINTON . 

COOK 
CRAWFORD 



EFFINGHAM 



HAjnLTON 
HANCOCK 
HARDIN 



JO DAVIESS 

,TOHNSON 

KANE 



MONTGOMERY 

MORGAN 

MOULTRIE 



ST. CLAIR 
SALINE 
SANGAMON 
SCHUYLER 



6,200 91 



5,190 
6.810 
2.550 



3.490 
9.190 
54,340 
5,140 



rt'ASHINGTON 



ALEXANDER 



WILLIAMSON 
WINNEBAGO 
WOODFORD 



(SET COUNT CONTINUES PACE 52) 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



PENNSYLVANIA'S 



MIGHTY 
MILLION'S 
_ MARKET 



AN,J^ BASIC BUY 

• LUZERNE 

• LACKAWANNA 

• LYCOMING 

• COLUMBIA 

• SCHUYLKILL ^wTV^^ 

• MONROE ^^^^fCllw^^ 

• PIKE ^^^*';:^3wS^'w^ 



• WYOMING 

• SULLIVAN 

• SUSQUEHANNA 

• BRADFORD 

• UNION 

• LEHIGH 

• SNYDER 

• MONTOUR 

• CARBON 

• CLINTON 




WILKES-BARRE SCRANTON HAZLETON WILLIAMSPORT 
8t66eR THAN A BILLION POLLAR MARKCT 

The third highest set count in the state .... reaching your customers in 19 of the 
state's Northeastern and Central Counties. To reach the same audience it would take 
28 newspapers, 36 radio stations, hundreds of billboards, and too much direct mail 

'"•"'■""•"""'" SewA BmI bg ik Miakij 

There's more to WBRE-TV's sales-producing story . . . 

GET ALL THE FACTS BEFORE YOU BUY! ^^^^^ ^0^^ 

WBRE-TV c^H 

—.^ WILKES-BARRE, PENNA. .^^Hf^fa^^ 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



HARTnOLOMKW 
HENTON 
BLACK rORD 



BOONE 
BROWN 
CARROLL 



GRANT 
CBEENE 
HAMILTON 



LA PORTE 
MADISON 



ST. JOSEPH 

SCOTT 

SHELBY 



STELBEN 
SULLIVAN 
SWITZERIx.\Nn 
TIPPECANOE 



NliKRBI IIOH 



ADAIR 
ADAMS 
ALLAMAKEE 



8.200 
lO.SCO 
2.400 
8.200 



33.900 
7.000 
30.800 



22.700 
8.800 
10,400 



8,060 
30,480 
5.540 



35,000 
186.890 
8,380 



3.360 
6,250 
8,360 



BEN-TON 










BLACK HAWK 






33 


690 


BOONE 










BREMER 




84 


4 


730 


BfCHANAN 


.-1.9(10 






600 




7.100 






440 


BTTLra 
















a 


750 


CARROLL 


(!.400 


93 


5 


830 
660 








5 


370 


CERRO GORDO 


11!. 300 










.■i.lOO 


92 




670 


CHICK.VSAW 


4.300 




3 


230 


CI..ARKE 


3.000 


63 




890 


CLAYTON 


I?: 200 


n 


* 


400 












CRAWFORD 


.5.400 






920 






90 














250 


DECATUR 








460 










760 


DES MOINES 










DICKINSON 


3.900 




2 


770 


DmilQUK 


20.700 




[8 


870 


EMMET 


4,200 






680 








6 




FLOYD 






5 


330 




.5.000 


85 






KHEMONT 








960 


greent; 


4.600 


89 




no 


GRTN-DY 






3 


620 










m 


IrA^^LTON 


0.500 


94 


6 


130 


HANCOCK 


4.100 




3 


280 






96 


5 


070 


HENRY 




79 




.330 




3.800 




2 














IDA 


3.200 




2 


920 




4.700 


81 


3 


790 


.TACKSON 




90 






.TASPER 


10.000 




9 


480 


.IRFFBBSON 


5.800 


79 




400 








10 


910 




3. GOO 




5 


m 




5.400 


81 




350 


KOS.'^ITH 


















390 




39.. 500 




37 


880 


LOUISA 


3.200 


63 


2 


1,50 


LYON 


4.100 










3.9C0 




3 


460 


MAHASKA 












7.200 




6 




MARSILiLL 


11.700 












90 


2 


980 




4.000 


82 


3 


290 


MONONA 








600 








2 


010 


MONTGOMERY 


5.100 


90 




610 








10 


090 












OSCKOLA 






2 


2.50 












PAI-O ALTO 






2 


540 




7.200 










4.200 








POLK 






79 


660 


POTTAWATTAMIE 


22.300 


94 


20 


960 


POWESHIEK 








200 








2 


160 




5.200 


77 


3 


980 


SCOTT 


















no 


SIOUX 
















12 


580 








5 


720 


TAYIX>R 


3.S00 






920 










270 


VAN BUBEN 


3.500 




2 






1H.400 


78 


12 


740 










710 


WASHINGTON 


6.300 


81 


5 


090 










530 


WEBSTER 


13,890 


96 


13 


180 








3 


040 










360 


WOODBURY 


36,000 




34 


540 


WIUGHT 


iiiino 


si! 


5 


310 



ANDERSON 


3000 


61 


1.830 










BARBER 


2.800 


72 


2.020 










BOURBON 


6.000 


68 


4,080 



BROWN 


4.900 




?.69fl 


CHASE 


'iloo 


Si 


10.030 
990 


CHAUTAUQUA 


2.100 


60 


1.250 



CHEYENNE 
CLARK 
CLAY 
CLOUD 



DICKINSON 
DONIPHAN 
DOUGLAS 



RAWXINS 
REPUBLIC 



SEDGWICK 



2.600 
1.000 
12,400 



2.190 
2,650 
1.590 



(SET COUNT CONTINUES PACE 56) 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



TV 

GUIDE 



Best- selling weekly magazine in America 




How important sponsors insure their ratings 



They advertise their programs in 
TV Guide, the magazine that 6 ^ ■> million 
TV families turn to for the shows they 
tune to. This audience alone is the equiv- 
alent of a 16 rating. 

Moreover, TV Guide's 51 regional editions 
enable you to coordinate your schedule 
with your station lineup . . . and you can 
position your ads for maximum exposure 
at any hour of any day. 

Listed here are some of the blue-chip 
advertisers now using TV Guide's rating 
-insurance. If you've overlooked this vital 
element in your fall promotion plans, 
get in touch with your TV Guide repre- 
sentative right away. 



TV GUIDE MAGAZINE CURRENT PROGRAM ADVERTISERS 


Aluminum Company of America 


Kraft Foods 


American Broadcasting Co. 


Oldsmobile Division, 


American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 


Genera! Motors Corp. 


Armstrong Cork Co. 


Plymouth Division of Chrysler Corp. 


Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc. 


Prudential Insurance Company 


DuPont, E. 1. de Nemours & Co. (Inc.) 


of America 


Eastman Kodak Co. 


Quaker Oats Co. 


Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 


Radio Corp. of America 


General Electric Co. 


Scott Paper Co. 


General Foods Corp. 


U.S. Steel Corp. 


Hallmark Cards, Inc. 


Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co., 


Johnson, S. C. & Son, Inc. 


Inc. (Listerine) 


(Johnson's Wax) 


Westclox-Div. of General Time Corp. 


Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp. 


Westinghouse Electric Corp. 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE ... A DAILY HABIT 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




THE 

PEOPLE'S 

CHOICE 



FIRST CHOICE 

.IrTTts time period in 

] WASHINGTON 
S CHICAGO . . . 
S LOS ANGELES 
S ST. LOUIS . . 
^ DETROIT , . 
SI CLEVELAND . 

An 4/SB 

^ NEW ORLEANS 40.3 

ARB 3/58 

m HOUSTON . . 26.0 




THE 
PEOPLE'S-.^. 

CHOICE m^^ 



Produced bv IRVING RRFCHFR- Writtpn hw Al I AM I iPQrn-rr ^»^ Dr^D■-^.-r .-.o.lto J 



^ 



jC 3 great years on network 

X^^ Huge, growing weekly audiences 
1st year — over 7 million homes 
2nd year — over ZVa million homes 
3rd year — over 9 million homes 

NTI Total Audience basis 

7^ Sponsored for three years by 
The Borden Company . . . 
co-sponsored second year by 
Procter &' Gamble . . . 
co-sponsored third year by / 

American Home Foods. •' 




Get on the bandwagon for *, 

104 hilarious half -hours ' 

of The People's Choice 

— now finally available 
for local and regional 
sponsorship. 

It's exactly what the'^g^^rs 
viewers want, as national and 
local ratings proudly proclaim. 

It's exactly what advertisers 
are looking for: a show that 
reaches and sells the whole family. 
ARB Nationals from 
October '55 through May '58 
tally 253 viewers per 100 sets 
for The People's Choice 

— 30% Men, 41% Women, 
29% Children. 

This is the winning candidate 
you've been waiting for a 
long, long time. Be sure to 
vote early —-and of ten . 






ABC FILM SYNDICATION 



/no. 



1501 Broadway 
New York 36 
LAckawanna 4-5050 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



Kentucky (continued) 



AXDERSON 
BAliiARD 
BARREN 



V1>EN 




HLAND 


2.500 




19.900 



GRAYSON 

GREEN 

GREENUP 



HENDERSON 



.lESSAinNE 

JOHXSON 

KENTON 



LYON 
McCRAOKEN 

Mccreary 



162.750 
2.130 
3.190 



3.240 
1,630 
2.330 



BEAUREGARD 

BIENVILLE 

BOSSIER 



CALD\VEIJ> 
CAMERON 
CATAHOULA 



JESOTO 

3 BATON ROUGE 

JAST CARROLL 



•TEPFERSON 
•lEFF DAVIS 
LAFAYETTE 



OUACHITA 
PLAQUEinNES 
POINTE COUPEE 



ST. CHARLES 



ST. HELENA 
ST. .JOHN BAPT 



ST. MARY 
ST. TAMMANY 
TANGIPAHOA 

TERRBBON-NE 



2.120 
3.970 
52,750 
2.490 



ALLEGANY 
ANNE ARUNDEL 
BALTIMORE 
CALVERT 
CAROLINE 



CARROLL 

l-ECIL 

CHARLES 



DORCHESTER 




84 


6.910 


FREDERICK 


18.200 


86 




GARRET 




58 






18.100 






HOWARD 










4.300 






NrONTGOMERY 




91 


78.060 




88,200 




79,600 


(JIEBN ANNES 
ST. MARYS 


8;600 


83 


7!l50 


SOMERSET 


5,800 






TALBOT 








WASHINGTON 


25,100 




20,170 



WORCESTER 



FRANKLIN 
HAMPDEN 
HAMPSHIRE 



NORFOLK 
PIA-MOUTH 
SUFFOLK 
WORCESTER 



CILARLEVOIX 


slooo 


73 


2.830 


(.llEBOYGAN 


3,600 


73 


6.540 




3.400 


86 


2.940 








8.980 


CRAWFORD 


1.100 


81 


890 




9.600 






DICKINSON 




82 






14.100 










73 






105.400 








2.600 







MEADE 
MENHFEE 
MERCER 
JIETCALFE 



MORGAN 
ML'HLENBBRG 
N-BLSON 



POWELL 


1.500 


38 


570 


PL-LASKI 








ROBERTSON 


500 




400 


ROCKCASTLE 








ROWAN 


2.500 






IHSSHLL 




53 





'i;.MBERLAND 



I'lSCATAdClS 
SA(!ADAHOC 
SOMERSET 



.SPONSOR • 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



ONLYPULSE 
DELIVERS 
THE 100% 
WHOLE 
SAMPLE 



Of the three major television services, Pulse 
alone delivers the complete sample contracted for 
— a pre-determined sample of high accuracy. 

Unlike mail-diary, meter, or telephone methods 
that miss millions — the educationally handicapped 
millions unable to cooperate in paper work; the 
indifferent millions who refuse the chore of record 
keeping; the millions who lack telephones — Pulse 
alone uses direct, face-to-face interviewing right 
in the home. 

Since 1941 Pulse has developed accredited tech- 



Pulse rings doorbells 
interviews families 
in their homes 




Largest Scientific Sampling 

*'Only U. S. Census talks with more families" 




niques of sampling, a tremendous operation, the 
largest known to the broadcast industry — in fact, 
the largest sampling outside the U. S. Census. 

Looking at a typical example : you have a night- 
time Television Network program? Pulse's sample 
"Base 6,000" for your show means that Pulse in- 
terviewers actually talk with 6,000 different fami- 
lies about your show. This sample of identical size 
— but different families — is repeated next month, 
and the next, and the next, a staggering cumulative 
total. No panel bias, no inertia. 

In an interesting new slide presentation, we 
have compressed the essential Pulse pluses. See it. 
Let your own judgment, not hearsay, decide 
whether or not your firm can use this vital assist, 
profitably. We reported 222 different U. S. markets 
last year, more this year. Please write. Or for an 
appointment at your own best convenience, phone 
Judson 6-3316. 



730 FIFTH A VENUE 



NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



ULSE, Inc. 



LOS ANGELES • CHICAGO • LONDON 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



Michigan (continued) 



I'RKSlUB ISLE 



6.140 
I6S,33« 
3.610 



TODD 

TRAVEniSB 

WABASHA 



3.870 
10.840 
3.010 
2.300 



2.360 
4.060 
2.010 



MSKPII 
"ir.CRAFT 



CASS 

CHIPPEWA 

CHISAGO 



COOK 

COTONWOOD 
CROW wrxG 



FAKIBAULT 
FILLMORE 



LB SIEUR 



MKBKBU 
MILLB I..Ars 
MORIUSON- 



S.I 70 
1.690 
14.450 
11.320 
16.510 



3.370 
5.560 
16.590 



3.360 
5.360 
5,190 



2.130 
2,260 
3.220 





557,600 


57 


315,240 


ADAMS 






5,350 


AMORN 


7,300 






AMITE 




42 


1,680 


ATTALA 








BENTON 


1,900 


53 


1.000 


BOLIVAR 


i.i.iion 


4S 


7,480 


CALHOITN 




41 


1,510 


CARROLL 








CHICKASAW 


4,000 


41 


1,650 










CLAIBORNE 


2,600 






CU\RKE 


4,200 




2,220 


CLAY 
COAHOMA 


S,800 
14,500 


50 


7:23° 
















1,850 


DB SOTO 


5,300 








14,000 




7,300 


FRANKLIN 










2,500 


4!) 


1,230 



LAFAYETTE 



LEFLORE 
LINCOLN 
LOWNDES 



NBAVTON 
NOXUBEE 
OKTIBBBHA 



PERRY 

PnCE 

PONTOTOC 



.lEFFERSON 



l'_ LINN 



24.520 
3,280 
9,540 
3,360 



PIPESTONE 



RICB 
ROCK 
ROSEAU 



STONE 


1.500 19 


730 


SUNFLOWER 




380 


TALLAHATCHIE 


0.700 51 3 


430 


TATE 






TIPPAH 


4,100 53 2 




TISHOAHNGO 


3,400 53 1 


790 


TUNICA 


5,800 .'-,:! 3 




UNION 


5,500 49 2 


690 


WALTHALL 


3,200 47 1 




WARREN 


13,300 G-i 8 




WASHINGTON 




446 




3,600 53 r 


8.10 


WEBSTER 


2,700 47 1 




WILKINSON 


2,900 42 1 


210 


WINSTON 






YALOBUSHA 


3.400 44 1 
8,400 ,59 4 


480 
950 



ST u>ris 


457,500 


90 


439.780 


STK OK.NIvVIEVE 






2,430 








5,720 


SCHUYLER 






910 


SCOTI^ND 


2,400 






SCOTT 


8.900 


74 





13 SEPTEMBER 19,58 



YOU'RE ONLY 

HALF-COVERED 

IN NEBRASKA 
IF YOU DON'T USE KOLN-TV! 




LINCOLN A-Z ARB SURVEY 
JANUARY, 1958 





Viewed Most 
Before 6:00 P.M. 


Viewed Most 
After 6:00 P.M. 


KOLN-TV 


290/0 


48% 


Sfation B 


21 


19 


Station C 


16 


13 


Station D 


4 


9 




No matter how you slice it in Nebraska, you'll still 
come up with only two big TV markets. One is 
Omaha, the other is Lincoln-Land. 

To cover Omaha, obviously, you need an Omaha 
TV station. To cover Lincoln-Land ^ 232,397 TV 
families and 69 counties — you need KOLN-TV. 
No other station fully covers the area. 

Ask Avery-Knodel for all the facts on KOLN-TV— 
the Official Basic CBS Outlet for South Central 
Nebraska and Northern Kansas. 



KOLN-TV 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 1000-FT. TOWER 
COVERS LINCOLN-LAND — NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 

Avery-fCnode/, Inc., Exclusive National Represenlatives 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 195S 



Missouri (continued) 



STOnnARD 

srixiTAX 



WASHINOTON 



CAETER 
CASCADE 
CHOUTEAU 



DAWSON 
DEER LODGE 
FALLON 



GALL-XTIX 
GARFIELD 
GLACIER 



JIDITH BASIN 



UltlSSELSHELL 

PARK 

PETROLEUM 



PHILLIPS 
PONDERA 
POWDER RIVER 



RICHLAND 



STATE a COUNTY 


HOUSEHOLDS 


PERCENT 


NUMBER 


nonoE 


a.coo 


9r, 


9.100 


DOIOLAS 






94.850 




1.100 


48 




FIIJ.MORE 


3,000 


72 


2.160 



KEITH 
KEYA PAHA 
KIMBALL 
KNOX 
LANCASTER 



LOUP 

MC PHERSON 

MADISON 



HEDWILLOW 
KlrH.\RDSON 
ROCK 



SAUNDERS 
SCOTTS BLUFF 
SEWARD 



SHERIDAN 



3.000 80 



N£W JERSEY 



SOMKRSET 



NEW MEXICO 



EDDY 
GUADALUPE 



SOCOKRO 

TAOS 

TORRANCE 



VALENCIA 

NEW YORK 



CATTARAUGUS 



15,740 
31,350 
10.590 



9.630 
9.680 
3.120 



4,526,020 
75,510 
10,470 
390.330 



ANTELOPE 

ARTHUR 

BAN'NER 



CHURCHILL 

CLARK 

I)OUOL.\S 

ELKO 

ESMERALDA 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



CUSTER 
DAKOTA 
DAWES 



2,230 
2.580 
3.030 
3.180 



16.730 
22.280 
13.640 



SPONSOR • 



13 SEPTEMBEK 1958 



Nielsen No. 3 reports 




in. , 
viewl 

greater growth in Rochester, New Yorl( 



ONLY WROC-TV can guarantee maximum circulation 

■oughout the IS-coimty Rochester, New York area... 
WROC-TV gives advertisers greater coverage and more circu- 
lation. Every advertising dollar spent on WROC-TV delivers 
more than five television homes compared to the other sta- 
tion's four. This assures advertisers of the lowest cost per 
thousand in this rich, prime area where nearly a million 
people spend more than $2 billion annually. 

MARKET COVERAGE 

Homes reached 26.5 % MORE than the other 

monthly Rochester station. 



A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 

WROC-TV, Rochester, N. Y. • WSVA, WSVA-TV, Harrisonburg, Va. ||jj|[: 

WGR, WGR-TV, Buffalo . WNEP-TV, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. 



Homes reached 
once a week 



8% MORE than the other 
Rochester station. 



DAYTIME CIRCULATION 



Homes reached 
once a week 



Homes reached 
daily average 



24.7% MORE than the other 
Rochester station. 



38.8% MORE than the other 
Rochester station. 



NIGHTTIME CIRCULATION 



Homes reached 
once a week 

Homes reached 
daily average 



20.8% MORE than the other 
Rochester station. 



28.8% MORE than the other 
Rochester station. 



Represented Nationally by Peters, Griffin and Woodward 

Sources: Sales Management 1958; Nietsen tt3, Spring 1938 



WROC-TV 



NBC- ABC-Channel 5 
Rochester, N. Y. 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



New York (continued) 



ST. LAWRENCE 


31 


BOO 


74 


23,420 


SARATOGA 


25 


100 




22.600 


SCHKNEOTADY 


52 


500 


90 


47.320 


SCHOHARIE 




400 






SCHITTLER 






88 


4.050 


SENECA 




300 










800 






SUFFOLK 


15S 


900 




137.560 






400 






TIOGA 


1(1 


200 




9.070 


TOMPKINS 




900 


84 




ULSTER 


33 


600 


89 


29.900 


WARREN 




200 






WASHINGTON 


la 






12230 


WAYNE 


17 


700 








228 


300 


93 


212.240 


NYYOMING 


8 


900 


89 


7.950 
5.250 



IIOCKINGHAM 










22.000 


SI 


17.810 


lUTHERFORD 


11.300 






SAAfPSON 








SCOTLAND 


fi.2;)n 






STANLY 






10.130 




4.S00 








11.900 






SWAIN 






920 


TRANSYLVANIA 


3.800 






T\-RRELL 


1.200 




720 




10..SO0 








8.000 












31.510 


WARREN 














1.770 


WATAUGA 


4.100 


(50 


2.480 


WAYNE 














7.170 


WII>.SON 


13.400 


71 


9.960 



S-ATE ft COUNTY 


HOUSEHOLDS PER 


CENT NUMBER 


Si^" 


19.300 9 

17.900 n 

7.700 8 


17.290 

2 16 470 

3 I79;i30 


ITLTON 


,s.r>oo 8 


7.530 



9.940 
244.750 
14.950 
8 480 
5,170 
6.300 
8.290 
6.120 



NORTH CAROLINA 



NORTH DAKOTA 



ALAMAN.E 






S8 


18.890 


ALEXANDER 




500 














1.370 


ANSON 




000 






ASHE 






63 


3.270 








61 


1,880 


BEAT7F0RT 




400 




7.900 






900 




3.930 


BL.\DEN 




600 




3.240 


BRINS\VTCK 




500 


55 


2.470 


BUNCOMBE 


3fi 


400 




25.920 


BURKE 








9.100 


CABARRUS 


17 


500 


88 


15.430 


CALDWELL 


11 




75 


8.370 


CAMDEN 




400 






CARTERET 




900 






CASWELL 




300 


69 


2.960 








88 


16,140 


CHATHAM 




100 


63 


3.850 


CHEROKEE 




200 






CHOWAN 




900 




1.720 


CLAY 










CLB\'ELAND 


16 


500 




12.420 


COLLTHBUS 








6.340 


CRAVEN 


13 




78 


10,870 


CUMBERLAND 


28 


400 




15,750 


CURRITUCK 




800 


72 


1,290 


DARE 




300 




770 


DAVIDSON 


1« 


100 


86 


15.490 
















600 




5.480 


DURHAM 


29 








EDGECOMBE 


12 


200 




9.240 


FORSYTH 










FRANKLIN 




000 




3.760 






600 




25,750 


G.\TES 




300 






GRAHAM 








750 


GRANVILLE 




800 




4.520 








86 




GUILFORD 




300 






HALIFAX 


13 






8,520 


HARNETT 




900 




6,930 


HAYWOOD 






62 




HENDERSON 




500 




5,920 


HERTFORD 








3,370 












HYDE 




400 






IREDELL 




600 






JACKSON 




300 




2,410 


JOHNSTON 


15 


700 


62 


9,670 






300 




1,340 






600 


63 




LENOIR 




600 






LINCOLN 




900 


72 


4.950 


MC DOWELL 




800 


68 


4,610 


MACON 








2.180 


MADISON 




300 






MARTIN 




100 




4.060 


MECKLENBURG 


71 


000 


86 


61,150 


MTCHBLL 




400 






MONTOOMrav 




3on 






JIOORE 




200 




5,220 


NASH 




300 


64 


g.rso 


NEW HANOVER 


21 






15,150 






900 




4.I3U 


ONSLOW 




.-.00 


64 


7.360 






100 




7,250 


PAMLICO 






58 


1,450 


PA.SQUOTANK 




300 




5.230 










2,370 


PERQUIMANS 




500 




1,790 






400 




3,700 


PITT 




800 


86 


12,790 


POLK 




000 




2,440 


RANDOLI'H 




000 




11,370 


RICH.MON-D 


I« 






8,050 


ROBESON 


20 


600 


63 


13,050 



BENSON 
BILLINGS 
ROTTINEAU 



BOWilAN 

T^URKB 
BURLEIGH 



DICKEY 
DIVIDE 
DUNX 



GOLDEN VALLEY 




43 


340 


GRAND FORKS 


12,800 








1.600 


82 1 




PRIGGS 






120 


HETTINGER 




49 


890 




1.500 








2,100 




340 


LOGAN 


1.200 








2,800 




640 








ORO 






42 


760 


IniHCKR 


5.200 




780 

1,30 


MORTON- 


5.500 


82 4 








42 f 


0,50 










OLIVER 






270 


PEAfBINA 










1.900 


.■9 1 


130 




3.200 






RANSOM 








RENVILLE 


i.4on 




830 


RICHLAND 








ROLETTE 


2.200 


.-.0 1 


lOO 


SARGENT 


1.800 


74 1 


340 







42 


210 


STARK 


4.000 








1.200 




1.040 


STUTSMAN 


6. 800 


71 


4.840 




1.200 






TRAILL 


2.800 


56 


2.430 
2,570 








9,150 


\\nj.iA.\is 


^■•illo 


']"> 


31900 



ADAMS 




91 


2.061 




ALLEN 


31,100 




27 


790 












ASHTAIUI.A 


28.i;oo 






040 






87 


ri 




AUGLAIZE 




90 


9 


410 


BBLMONr 








790 




7.300 


88 


6 


430 


BUTLER 










CARROLL 


5,800 




5 


160 


CHAMPAIGN 


9,100 


91 


8 


270 


CLARK 


39.200 








CLERMONT 


17,300 




15 


820 


CLINTON 


9.200 








COLUMBIANA 


32.800 


91 


29 


760 


COSHOCTON 


10.700 


85 


9 


080 




13.900 






440 


CUYAHOGA 


485.400 


92 


44J 


440 


DARKE 
DEFIANCE 


8.-00 


90 




820 



MONTGOMERY 



9.600 
2.300 
2.500 
1.700 



74.630 
16.390 
14.190 
6.080 
8.270 
20.020 
3.760 



7.340 
7.650 
6.640 



8,370 
86,810 
138,450 
49,790 
20,690 

5,980 



df;laware 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 





"W #ll» f 



NEW CHANNE 
FOR TOLEDO 







WTOL-TV, CHANNEL 11 

AIR DATE NOV. 1958 



H-R TELEVISION, INC. 

AS NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



The St. Lawrence Seaway, which will make Toledo a deepwater port and trigger 
an explosive boost to its economy. 

Frazier Reams -President Thomas S. Bretherton-Vice President & Gen. Mgr 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



Oklahoma (continued) 



KINGFISHER 
KIOWA 
T^ATIMER 
LB FLORE 



MC CI'RTAIN 



MC INTOSH 

MAJOR 

MARSHALL 



OKLAHOMA 



OKMXnXiEE 

OSAGE 

OTTAWA 



PITTSBURG 
PONTOTOC 
POTTAWATOXnE 



ROGER SnLLS 



SEQUOYAH 



TILLMAN 

TULSA 

WAGONTIR 



WOODWARD 



COOS 

CROOK 

CURRY 



GILLIAM 

GRANT 

HARNEY 



JEFFERSON 
JOSEPHINE 
KLAMATH 



LINCOLN 

LINN 

MALHEUR 



P OLK 
SHERMAN 
TILLAMOOK 
UMATILLA 



8.500 
8.420 
6.590 



7.870 
2.390 
8.480 



54,400 
32,300 
6,800 



.SOlfBRSET 

sillivan 
.tsquehan: 



:STMORELAND 



RHODE ISLAND 



WASiriNGTON !.'->. 90 

SOUTH CAROLINA 



AIKEN 

ALLENDALE 

AN-DERSON 



CHESTER 

CHESTERFIELD 

CLARENDON 



22,3 ro 

55,350 
91.750 



2,290 
3, 150 
47,430 



[4,220 
9.750 
59,240 



.SPARTANBURG 



WII.LIAMSRI RG 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



CODINGTON 



HITTCHINSON 



KINGSBURY 

LAKE 

LAWRENCE 



TRIPP 

TURN'ER 

UNION 



3.400 
1,200 
2,700 



5,r50 
6,670 

15,570 





196,900 6 


3 123.240 


AIRORA 








fi,800 4 




BENNETT 


!IOO 4 




BON HOMME 


2,300 7 


3 1.670 


BROOKINGS 


5,500 6 


7 3,690 




10,600 6 


1 6.420 


BRT'LE 




8 820 


Bl-PFALO 


400 5 








) 920 


CAMPBELL 


800 4 




CHARLES MIX 


4,600 4 


S 2.220 



YAMHILL 9,4( 

PENNSYLVANIA 

3,247,7( 
ADAMS 12,8( 

ALLEGHENY 476,4( 

ARMSTRONG 22,5( 

BEAVER 57, 4( 

BEDFORD 10,8( 



BERKS 



10,660 
439.240 
20,390 



35.970 
13,470 
75,750 



KERSHAW 
LANCASTEI 
LAURENS 



MARLBORO 



RICHLAND 



5,510 
6.760 
6.850 



CANNON 


2'000 


71 


1,410 


CARROLL 


7.500 


53 




CARTER 




71 




CHEATHAM 


2,000 


75 


1,490 


CHESTER 


2.500 


53 








47 


2.590 




1.700 


52 


890 


COCKE 


5,300 




2,710 


COFFEE 






5,350 , 


CROCKETT 


5.000 






CUMBERLAND 










105.200 


87 




DECATUR 






I.OIO , 


DB KALB 


2.(iO0 




1,690 




4,900 


65 


3,180 , 


DYER 






6,090 


SPONSOR 


• 13 


SEPTEMBER 


1958 



MEMO 

tes r: 




,0. Ml K.« Associates S^SS^lf 

^''^^^ '':iSe:'coverase Survey *3-1958 
"'''" oo„ as possible with 1958 

, « see all tl»e buyers soot, as p 
Please see 
Nielsen *3 inforn-ation. 

K»«tc fact that: 
Stress the one basic 

Based on monthly coverage ^^^^iejsdjtatio- 

Cxncidentally. che figures ^"^^^^ ,,, „,,er stations.) 
3,.ead of superiority ---X^^,,,^, City .arUet. 

♦-hftse are homes tn tne Included, 

remember, these adjoining states is it^cl 

rnuntv coverage iti a J ^ 

Ho fringe County ^^^^^^^^J 




ASK YOUR KATZ MAN to show you the A R B. 

figures, too. The combination of # 1 coverage plus #1 

viewer preference is the reason why more people 

make up their minds to buy while watching 

WKY-TV than any other statioa 

in the area. 



NBC — Channel 4 
OKLAHOMA CITY 



WKY-TV 

WKY Television System, Inc. 

WKY-TV, Oklahoma City; WKY RADIO, Oklahoma City 
WTVT Tampa; St. Petersburg; WSFA-TV, Montgomery 
Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY 



13 SEPTEMBEK 19.58 



Tennessee (continued) 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



FRANKbIN 

GIBSON 

GILES 



GRIXnY 
HA>rBLEN 
II.\MILTON 
H.\NCOCK 



HEXDEaiSOX 



LAKE 

LAITJERDALE 

LAWRENCE 



LEWIS 

LINCOLN 

LOUDON 



ROANE 

ROBERTSON 

RUTHERFORD 



SCOTT 

SEQUATCHJB 

SEVIER 



STEWART 
SULLIVAN 
SUJfNER 



WASHINGTON 



ARMSTRONG 

ATASCOSA 

AUSTIN 



BLANCO 
BORDEN 
BOSQUE 



71.900 
1.800 
4.900 



5.500 

157,300 

3.500 



6.900 









3,180 


(WLHOUN 


3.200 




1.760 




2.200 


61 


1,350 




42.300 




27.696 


CAMP 


2.300 








1,800 




r,390 




5.900 






(■\STRO 


1.400 


65 


910 




2,200 






rUEROKBE 


9.400 




5.600 


cmLnRESs 








(•I^\Y 


2,300 




1.800 


COCHRAN 




77 




<OKE 


1.200 
3.400 


65 


810 


COIJ.IN 


13.200 


82 


10.790 




2.100 










61 


2.970 


COMAI. 


fi.OOO 


70 


4.190 














55 


720 








5.780 


roiiYKl.l, 


4,200 


71 


2.980 




1,400 




720 






58 


920 
















1,840 


crl-BERSON 


.■ino 


62 




DALLAM 










263.000 


88 


232,320 










DBAF SMITH 


3.300 










57 


1.030 








10,300 


1)E WITT 


6.200 










58 


980 


nnraiT 










l.rm 


71 


1.060 










EASTI^AND 




62 


4,000 








I7.70O 


KDWARDS 






370 




12,.i00 


79 


9.860 










ERATH 


4,800 


64 


3.060 






63 


4.070 


TANNIN 


7.200 




4,360 






61 


3.450 








1.620 


riX)YD 










1.100 


63 


690 








6.680 


FRANKLIN 


1.300 


57 


740 


FREESTONE 


3.500 


57 


1.980 








1,990 


(lAINES 


2,400 




1.540 




37.000 




30.390 


OARZA 


1.800 


71 


t.270 


GILLESPIE 






1.750 


GLASSCOCK 


200 


65 


130 


GOLIAD 






830 


GANZALES 


5.400 




3,740 






71 


6.510 




24.900 


75 


18,690 


GREGG 






15,640 




3.400 




2,350 


GUADALUPE 








HALE 


10.000 


76 


7,550 










HAMILTON 


2.800 


64 


1,790 




1.200 




980 


HARDEMAN 


3.000 


63 


1,900 










HARRIS 


356.600 




310,600 




13.500 


67 


9.040 


HARTLEY 


3.400 




400 
2.350 


HAYS 


5.100 


70 


3.560 


HEMPHILL 


1.200 


55 


660 








2,920 


HIDALGO 




68 


31.950 




8.100 




6.930 


HOCKLEY 


6.000 


77 


4.630 


HOOD 


1.300 


77 


I.OOO 






57 


3.440 


HOUSTON 


5.100 




2.820 


HOWARD 


9.40O 




6,670 


HUDSPETH 


1.000 


59 


590 






82 


10,310 


HUTCHINSON 


10.600 


88 


9.300 






63 


250 


JACK 


1.900 


76 


1.450 


JACKSON 


3.600 




2,300 


JASPfJR 


5,300 


57 


3,010 








290 


JEFFKIISON 


09.000 


81 


55,900 




1.100 




540 


JIM WELLS 


8,100 


55 


4,490 








9,310 


.rONES 


6.200 


68 


4.190 








2.470 


KAUraiAN 


7.100 


78 


5.510 








1.200 



MAVERICK 

MEDINA 

MENARD 



MILLS 

MITCHELL 

MONTAGUE 



NOLAN 

NUECES 
OCHILTREE 



PALO PINTO 

PANOLA 
PARKER 



REFUGIO 
ROBERTS 
ROBERTSON 



1,800 
2^300 



SAN SABA 

SCHLEICHER 

SCURRY 



SHERMAN 

SMITH 

SOMERVETLL 



2,030 
1,060 
3,360 



2,830 
1,050 
2,790 



6,230 
680 
2,620 



STONEWALL 


900 


67 


£00 


SUTTON 


1,000 


49 


490 




2,400 




1,560 


TARRANT 


173,400 


86 


148. 950 


TAYLOR 


24.700 


76 


16,880 








430 


TERRY 


4,200 


73 


3,070 








620 


TITUS 


4,700 




2,510 






73 


15,740 


TRAVIS 


52,100 


78 


40.830 




2,300 


64 


r.480 


TYLER 


2,900 




1.740 


UPSHUR 


4,800 


60 


2.880 


UPTON 




62 


990 








2.680 


VAL VERDE 


4,900 


46 


2.230 



(SET COUNT CONTINUES PACE 70) 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



* the * 




■ 


■ 


8 








ARB* TOTE BOARD 




NASHVILLE 

SHARE OF AUDIENCE SIGN-ON TO SIGN-OFF 

STATION SHARE 




WIN 


WSIX-TV 


36.4 




PLACE 


STATION B 


35.4 




SHOW 


STATION C 


31.2 




•July 1958 1 





V V, 



Represented by: 

H. R. TELEVISION, INC. 

CLARKE BROWN COMPANY 



WSIX-TV 

NOW NASHYILLES 
No. 1 RATED STATION . . . 
by latest (July) ARB Ratings 



From WSIX-TV sign-on to sign-off — latest (July) 
ARB ratings show WSIX-TV has the largest audi- 
ence of any Nashville station! 
With a 36.4 share of audience and first place 
in 188* quarter hours, WSIX-TV dominates with 
1st or 2nd place in 286* quarter hours out of 
a weekly total of 388*. 

Lowest cost per thousand, top local program- 
ming, together with the great new shows 
planned by OIlie Treyz and ABC, now more 
than ever make WSIX-TV your most efficient buy 
in the rich Middle Tennessee-Southern Kentuc- 
ky-Northern Alabama market. 
Call your H-R or Clarke Brown man for avail- 
abilities. 

* including ties 




13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES 
AS OF MARCH 1958 

5 (continued) 



The SELLibrated (and only full 
powered) station in the 

GOLDEN VALLEY 

(Cent.ol Ohio) 

WHTN 
TV 



A COWLES OPERATION 



PROVED 3 WAYS 
AMERICA'S BEST TV BUY 

ARB. May J958 - highest rated station in 
America in markets of three or more 
stations. 

Te/epulse 7957 Year-End Review — highest 
rated station in America in markets of 
: for the entire 

in the market 

®KRQD-T3r^ 

CBS T.I.,i,io„ N...o,k . Ch.nr.l 4 . El C.o T.,.. 
^ REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



VAX ZAXDT 


5 200 


7.S 


4.070 


VirTORIA 


11.100 








4.100 






WALLER 






2.250 




4.700 






WASm.NGTOX 






3,320 


WEB It 


15.200 


56 


8.480 




9.800 




7.070 


WlIKfXER 


2.300 


52 






35.400 


80 


28.370 


WILHARGEm 


5.800 


70 










3.640 


WIU.1AMSON 


10.000 




7.480 


WILSON 






2.370 


WLNKLER 


3.400 




1.970 


WISE 






3.190 


WOOD 


4.900 


f.O 





CARBOX 


7.100 


55 


3.890 


DAGGETT 






40 


DAVIS 






IS.OIC 


DUCHESXE 




44 




EMERY 


1.400 




770 


GARFIELD 


700 


37 




GRAXD 


1.300 






IRON 








.IVAB 
KAXE 


^'eoo 


37 


860 


IIILLARD 






1.350 




700 


79 


550 


PIUTE 




37 




RICH 








SALT LAKE 






96.860 


SAX .lUAX 


1.300 


44 




SANT»ETE 


3.300 




2.020 




3,100 




1,900 


SIMMIT 


1.400 




I.IOO 




5.400 


83 




T IXTAH 


2.500 




1,100 




26.900 


92 


24.630 



IXGTOX 
NIA 
TDEX 








85 










690 


.';iV\'n<-'k'" 


4'.400 


81 


2.390 


(lULKAN.S 


5.400 


87 


4.700 



WASHIXGTOX 

WIXDHAM 

WIXDSOR 



AMHERST 


4.. 500 


70 


3.(30 


APPOMATTOX 


1.900 






ARLIXGTOX 






66.140 


AIGISTA 






ir,7(0 


BATH 






840 








4.720 




1.400 




800 


BOTETOURT 


4.000 




2,080 








2,400 


BrCIIAXAX 




54 


4.310 




2.500 




1.510 




22.l!00 






lAKOLIXE 


2 700 




2.030 




(i,700 




3.650 


rllAIU.OTTE 






2.200 




900 


71! 


680 


. lll.STEnFIELD 


'f'.SOfl 


75 


11.190 
L3S0 
520 




3.400 




2.350 


rlMBEllLAXD 


l.fiOO 


10 


960 


l.KKEXSON 






2.680 






88 


12.250 


KS.^iKX 






1.130 




47.800 


91 


43.660 



FAIOLHER 


-.700 






J'LOYD 








PLUVAXXA 








FRAXKLIX 




62 




FREDHmiac 


9.700 




7.910 


GILES 






3.670 




3,000 


76 




GOOCHL.\XD 






1.250 




5.700 






OREEN-B 




61 


790 


GREEXSVILLE 






2.660 


IL\LIFAX 














4.350 


HEXRICO 






80.420 




13.200 


75 


9.920 


HIGHLAXT) 




58 


460 


ISLE OF WIGHT 






2,310 


JAMES CITY 


2.800 




2,130 


KIXG & QUEEX 








KIXG GEORGE 


1,700 






KIXG WILLIAM 










2.300 




1,650 


LEE 










5.400 




4.650 


LOIISA 




73 




LIXEX-BURG 






1,990 




2.100 


60 


1.270 


MATHEWS 






1.300 




8,000 




5.270 


MIDDLESEX 


1,900 




1.440 


MOXTGOMBRY 


10.,500 


85 


8.950 










N-ELSOX 


3,200 




2.240 










XBWPORT X-EWS 


49.500 




43.540 






88 


125.640 


XORTH.\MPTOX 




62 


2.850 








1.710 


XOTTOWAY 


4.200 




2,790 






69 


2.280 








2,570 


PATRICK 


3.700 


55 


2,020 


PITTS YLVA^^A 


27.800 






POWHATAX 




73 


880 


PRIXCE EDWARD 


3,800 






PRIXCE GEORGE 


10.200 








20.000 




16.360 


PRINCE WM 


5.800 


86 


4.990 










RAPPAHAXNOCK 






790 


RICHMOXT) 






1.000 


ROAXOKE 


41,000 


87 


35.730 


ROCKBRIDGE 






4.170 


ROCKIXGHAM 






9.500 




6.200 


53 






6.600 


58 


3.840 


SHEXAX-DOAH 






3.760 




7.100 


59 


4.200 


SIHTHAMPTOX 


6.300 




3.920 




6,700 


73 


4.890 






73 


2.420 




1.500 












1,930 




11.600 


57 




WAKUKX 






3.220 



WASHINGTON 



CHELAX 










il.lOO 


80 


7.300 








23.370 


COLUMBIA 


1.600 




1.060 










DOUGLAS 


4..500 


57 


2.560 




1.100 














GARFIELD 


900 


67 


600 


GRANT 








GRAYS HARBOR 






13.080 


ISLAND 


4.300 


83 


3.590 


JM'FERSON 


2.400 


81 


1.950 








252.500 


KITSAP 


26.500 


88 


23.440 










KLICKITAT 


4.200 


5« 


2.490 


LB.VIS 


14.900 


72 


10.670 


LINCOLN 






2,700 


MASON 






4,080 


OKANOGAN 






5,080 


PVCIFIC 


3. .500 


61 


3.370 


I'END ORBaU.E 


2.400 




1,600 


PIERCE 


91.800 






SAN JUAN 


1,100 


83 


910 


SKAGIT 


1.5.800 




11.660 


SKAMANIA 




73 


1,320 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NATIONAL TV SET COUNT BY COUNTIES AS OF MARCH 1958 



ashington (continued) 



SNOHOMISH 


46,900 


87 


40,980 








80,310 


STEVENS 


6.400 












13,370 


WAHKIAKUM 


1,000 


61 


610 



WEST VIRGINIA 





514,800 


74 


382,500 










BERKELEY 






6,300 




7,700 


74 




BRAXTON 








BROOKE 


6.800 


92 


6,260 


CABELL 






31,520 


CALHOUN 








CLAY 






2,040 




2,000 






FAYETTE 






14,730 


GILMER 






900 




2.100 




1,120 


GREENBRIER 


9.100 












r,590 


HANCOCK 


9,700 


90 




H.4RDY 


2.100 


53 










13,170 


JACKSON 


3.400 


60 


2,040 


JEFFERSON 








KANAWHA 


70,500 


87 


61,300 








2,410 


LINCOLN 


4.700 


83 


3,890 








14,000 


MC DOWELL 


20.500 


73 


14.980 








15,490' 




9.000 






MASON 






4,960 




19.400 


72 




MINERAL 






3,080 






78 


8,660 


MONONGALIA 




81 


13,130 


MONROE 


3.000 






MORGAN 


2.100 




1,160 


NICHOLAS 


6.600 


62 




OHIO 






20,560 


PEN-DLETON 








PLEASANTS 






960 


POCAHONTAS 


2.700 


53 










4,750 


PUTNAM 


5,100 


83 


4,220 


RALEIGH 


23.400 


65 


15,260 










RITCHIE 


2.800 


60 


r,330 
2,210 


SUMMERS 


4,200 


60 












nCKER 


2,200 


54 


i.tso 




2,400 






UPSHUR 


4.800 




2,600 






78 


6.660 






54 


2,090 


\\-ETZEL 










1,200 


61 


730 


WOOD 

wyo:ming 


9!200 




14,700 
6.120 





l.ri 2,300 


87 97 


630 






69 


.730 


ASHLAND 










10.800 


81 1 


,740 


BAYFIELD 








BROWN 


30,400 


91 27 


650 




4,300 






BURNETT 




74 2 


,160 










CHIPPEWA 


12,300 


82 l( 


110 


CLARK 












81 8 


,880 


CRAWFORD 








DANE 




87 5 


090 


DODGE 




90 15 






6,500 




790 


DOUGLAS 


14,100 


84 M 


a?fl 


DUNN 




83 ( 


360 


EAU CLAIRE 


17,700 




770 


FLORENCE 




73 


660 


FOND 1)U LAC 








FOKE.-^T 






690 




12.300 


80 ! 


880 








980 




4,600 






IllWA 




73 4 


110 


tT.'ksox 


112 


78 1 


950 
800 




13,400 




120 






69 ; 


520 




26,200 












180 


I.A .:hiii<se 




83 Ij 


030 


I.AFA\ETTE 


5,200 




140 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



LANGLADE 6 
LINCOLN 6 


■500 


79 


5! 100 










MARATHON 2! 


,300 




18,190 






84 












MILWAUKEE 311 


,200 


92 


286,860 








6,950 


OCONTO 7 




89 


6,470 




700 




4,840 


OUTAGAMIE 25 


.700 


91 


23,330 


OZAUKEE : 










.100 


82 


1,730 


PIERCE ( 










.400 


89 


6,580 


PORTAGE 9 






7,660 






73 


3,340 


RACINE 37 


,200 








.400 


73 


3,950 


ROCK 32 








RUSK 4 




73 


3,270 


ST CROIX 


,900 


89 


7,070 






83 


9,390 


SAWYER 2 








SHAWANO 9 


,600 


84 


8,060 


SHEBOYGAN 2b 


.600 


90 


24,060 


TAYLOR 






3.420 


TREMPEALEAU 6 


.800 






VERNON 7 


,400 




5,450 




.900 






WALWORTH 15 


.000 


90 


13,550 



WASHINGTON 

WAUKESHA 

WAUPACA 





97,roo 


54 


52,270 




6,900 




3,560 


BIG HORN 




45 


1,660 


CAMPBELL 


1,300 




500 


CONWERSE 


I'eoo 


55 
53 


2,880 
840 


CROOK 






460 




6,200 






GOSHEN 






1,910 


HOT SPRINGS 


1,800 






JOHNSON 




40 


560 




17,200 


82 


14.020 


LINCOLN 


2,300 




1,200 






53 


7,800 


NIOBRARA 






510 




6,000 








2,400 




I.IOO 


SHERIDAN 




45 


2,710 


SIBLETTE 


900 






SWEETWATER 




43 


2,870 








380 








890 








S40 


WESTON 


2,300 


38 


870 



.LOWSTONB PK 




YOU 
CAN'T 
MISS! 



IN WISCONSIN 



• Programming the BEST of all three 
networks, ABC, NBC and CBS. 

• A single station market in the heart 
of Wisconsin . . . covering twice the 
population and twice the area with 
our new 1,000 foot tower with maxi- 
mum power. 

• Serving the giant land of ^/^ million 
people and two million cows. 

VlfEAU-TV 

EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN 

See your Hollingbery man— in Minneapolis, see Bill Hurley 




Now, you say when 



And how often too! For once programs and commercials are recorded on Videotape*, scheduling is wide 
open. Playbacks can be telecast immediately — hours later — or anytime you decide. At least 100 repeats 
can be made from any one recording. Copies can be made. And tapes recorded on a VR-1000 Videotape 
Recorder can be played back on any other VR-1000, anywhere. 

Never before have sponsors been able to schedule commercials to reach selected audiences so easily. 

Never have stations had so many "live" availabilities to offer. 

Get the complete story on the many things Videotape Recording can do for you. Write today. 

CONVERTS TO COLOR ANYTIME • LIVE QUALITY • IMMEDIATE PLAYBACK • PRACTICAL EDITING • TAPES INTERCHANGEABLE • TAPES ERASABLE, REUSABLE • LOWEST OVERALL COST 



350 CHARTER STREET, REDWOOD CI 



TY, CALIFORNI 

fices in Principal Citi« 




SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



VIDEOTAPE 

{Cont'd from page 42) 

Wade Adv., solved rehearsal time 
problem by taping commercials for 
one weekly show while doing live 
commercials for another on the air; 
thus all commercials for two different 
shows are managed the same evening 
between 8 and 10:45 p.m. All-State 
Carpet probably is first carpet com- 
pany to show off its line via color 
tape. NBC (KRCA is the affil) 
makes no extra charge for color as 
part of its tape promotion program. 

KCOP, Los Angeles: Taping com- 
mercials for clients: White Front 
Stores, Central Chevrolet, Cal Worth- 
ington Motors, So. Calif. Dodge 
Dealers, Howell Chevrolet. The car 
dealers appear to be using KCOP 
tape facilities to make "live" satura- 
tion campaigns monetarily practical. 
AFTRA local talent fee schedules per- 
mit unlimited tape replays at $130 
per week. (AFTRA basic fee for a 
local live commercial up to three 
minutes is $27.50, and may be re- 
peated six times for $130). KCOP 
will tape its upcoming series with 
Mae West dispensing advice to the 
lovelorn, but General Manager Al 
Flanagan does not foresee syndica- 
tion "for at least six months when 
there should be more than 10 or 12 
markets to syndicate to." 

KTLA, Hollywood: Expects its 

first recorder in October, its second 
in December. Plans to do commer- 
cials, special events telecasts, syndi- 
cate, as well as to test videotape for 
feature film production (KTLA and 
Paramount Sunset Corp., both on the 
same lot, are subsidiaries of Para- 
mount Pictures Corp; employees are 
lATSE). 

KHJ-TV, Don Lee Videotape Record- 
ing Service), Los Angeles: Program 
Director James Higson sees biggest 
present value of tape facilities in 
"trial work" (commercials, pilots, 
screen testing for sponsors). A taped 
pilot can be piped via closed-circuit 
to an agency, avoiding expense or 
risk of doing it live. Max Baer, seek- 
' ing sponsors for his new KHJ show, 
landed a beer client through a com- 
mercial he taped. He and Don Sher- 
wood, another personality, have 
pitched other clients same way. Sta- 
tion reports it increased its broadcast 



hours by 32 a week through accom- 
modating a car dealer who wanted to 
sponsor daily movies with commer- 
cials done by himself. KHJ is close 
to a deal for syndicating Hollywood 
Closeiip through Guild Films. 

KTTV, Los Angeles: "Nothing in 
KTTV's 10-year history compaires in 
significance with the advent of video- 
tape," says President Richard A. 
Moore. "Its implications in terms of 
versatile programing and reduced 
costs are revolutionary." Since March, 
KTTV has been using tape in just 
about everything. Its hour-long Di- 
vorce Court is already in national 
syndication through Guild Films (30 
shows are on tape). Tape is used 
in station promotion; a taped presen- 
tation was recently shown to admen 
in New York. As for commercials, 
KTTV has some good "case his- 
tories": (1) For Barker Bros, depart- 
ment store, and its agency (Mays & 
Co.), KTTV taped 23 one-minute in- 
store commercials within five hours at 
an estimated one-fifth the cost if they 
had been filmed. (2) For Squirt 
Bottling Co., KTTV produced five one- 
minute commercials in three hours 
making feasible that client's sponsor- 
ship of Miss Universe Beauty Pageant. 
(3) A national record company esti- 
mated a saving over film of between 
$1,000 in taping two two-and-a-half- 
minute commercials at the station. 

KPIX, San Francisco: All live 
commercials scheduled for after 10 
p.m. release are pre-taped earlier when 
technical crews are on regular duty; 
in the day; Saturday morning shows 
are taped during week. Tape provides 
a new tool for the pr department; 
Press previews are now set up at con- 
venient hours or repeated for different 
groups at different times. Important 
public service programs are preserved 
on tape for later promotional use or 
submission to program awards commi- 
tees. KPIX maintains revenue when 
talent goes on vacation by pre-taping 
commercials, also uses tape for audi- 
tions for prospective clients. 

KRON-TV, San Francisco: Experi- 
menting widely in special effects with 
videotape; has managed many unusual 
combinations with animated props, 
unique lighting, reverse polarization, 
special makeup and costuming. Pro- 
gram Manager Doug Elleson says, 
{Please turn to page 92) 



"How to be in two 
places at once" 




♦^^. 




Mr. Joel Chaseman 
Program Manager, WJZ-TV 
Television Hill, Baltimore 

"We Videotaped* a busy candi- 
date's campaign speech. He was 



on the a 


r "live" 


and actively 


campaign 


ng at the 


same time- 


literally 


n two p 


aces at one 


time, thanks to ou 


r Videotape"-' 


Recorder 







CORPORATION 



850 CHARTER STREET, REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 



*TM Ampex Corpora 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



As dual ownership continues to grow, SPONSOR ASKS: 

Should stations under 

joint ownership (am & tM 



With the increasing need for pro- 
gram promotion, three station men 
(liscuss the pros and cons of cross- 
plugging their radio and tv outlets. 

Jim McNamara, 'lational sales manager, 
ff- ALA, n AI.ATV. Mobile, Ala. 



r 



Cross-plug 
your head 
off and let 
the fittest 



\o amount of cross-plugging will help 
a dog. This is a private theory but a 
valid one. Take any weak show com- 
peting with a program the calibre of 
Gunsmoke, and it is my belief that 
full-page ads in the newspapers, out- 
door billboards, taxi posters, satura- 
tion radio and television schedules 
will help a little rating-wise, but will 
not accomplish an awful lot. 

Perhaps the battle for viewer/ 
listeners might be compared to the 
use of salesmanship in a political cam- 
]>aign. The ultimate goal of the politi- 
cal candidate is to "get a vote from 
each and every registered voter." The 
battle of the radio and television sta- 
tion is "to get a vote from each and 
every viewer /listener" (who might 
possibly be inten'iewed or polled). 
The basic rules of salesmanship apply 
in both cases. The copy must (1) get 
the viewers'/listeners' attention (2 1 
arouse their interest in the show (3 I 
convince them this is the show they 
do not want to miss (4) arouse their 
desire to want to see it, and finally, 
i5[ "ask for the order"' fask for their 
tune-in i . 

Of course all of this presupposes 
that you are programing some broad- 
cast entertainment worth hearing or 
seeing (there must be "something in 
it" for the order-signer). 

Now. moving to the matter at hand 
. . . "to cross-plug or not to cross- 



plug."' Assuming that there is a joint 
ownership of the radio and television 
station, it is inconceivable to consider 
that in "the battle for votes" one would 
not use every possible medium, con- 
sistent with a given budget, and make 
the widest choices possible. 

Certainly, where there is no outlay 
of cash (other than bookkeeping 
swaps) , the use of the opposite medium 
(radio to tv or vice- versa) would be 
the first consideration of any promo- 
tion manager. Next, since every show 
cannot possibly be allocated the same 
amount of promos, due to the limita- 
tions of any broadcaster's schedule, 
onlv the real "vote-getting" shows 
should be plugged. The hope is that if 
the promotion man "gets the order' 
on the good ones, by some miracle, 
they'll stay tuned through the "dogs," 
and the station will have won the 
majority of "votes" for each contest 
(show-) throughout the daytime or 
nighttime schedule. 

The boys on the other side of the 
cross-plugging fence will undoubtedly 
scream that to remind radio listeners 
to Avatch any given television show is 
suicide, or for their television station 
to try to sell its viewers on listening 
to its sister radio station is asking for 
a reduced tune-in. In rebuttal, let's re- 
view the opening statement of the first 
paragraph: "No amount of cross- 
plugging will help a dog" ... so we 
might add ... no amount of air-selling 
will convince a red-blooded American 
to turn off Gunsmoke and listen to the 
Harry Hatband show on WXXX radio. 
Conversely, no amount of air-selling 
will convince a listener to abandon his 
time-temperature-tunes early morning 
radio show to watch a travelogue. 
Lovely Brushwood, Texas on the sister 
tv station. 

So, sage gents, cross-plug your head 
off and let the fittest survive, and as 
long as it beats those competitors of 
yours and you get "the numbers," 
your Madison Avenue trudging will 
be hapjjy forever after. 




Paul H. Goldman, vice president & 

general manager, KNOE, KNOETV, 

Monroe, La. 



Well. 

planned 

cross-plugging 



Radio and tv stations under the same 
ownership which do not use their facil- 
ities to promote each other's programs 
and special events overlook the most 
potent exploitation technique of all. 

In the case of KNOE Radio and 
KNOE-TV, we use both spot and news 
programs to build listeners and view- 
ers for radio and tv shows, personali- 
ties, special promotions and events. 

When KNOE Radio schedules any- 
thing of a special nature, whether it is 
a commercial program or a public serv- 
ice promotion or event of community 
interest, the tv news department pro- 
motes it fully with advance pictures, 
stories and film clips, and runs stories 
and films during the actual course of 
the event as well. Naturally, the event 
or promotion is promoted in advance 
by a schedule of ID's and spot promos. 
The same kind of promotion and news 
coverage is given tv events by radio. 

Regular programs on each medium 
are plugged regularly by the sister sta- 
tion with spot announcement schedules. 

Radio d.j.'s are given tv exposure via 
personal appearances on tv interview 
programs and on live dance party 
shows. 

At sign-off, whichever station goes 
off first on a given night always invites 
the listeners or the viewers to dial or 
tune to the other station for the re- 
mainder of its broadcast schedule and 
gives a brief rundown of what is in 
store for them. 

I am convinced that this sort of well- 
planned cross-plugging and promotion- 
al campaign is greatly responsible for 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



ti:ross-plug? 



KNOE Radio's share of audience being 
as high as all the other stations in the 
market put together, and same goes 
for Monroe having much higher than 
average sets-in-use day and night. 

Nowhere are there two more effective 
media to reach and sell a sponsor's 
product than radio and tv. It is well 
known and thoroughly accepted (to 
put it mildly) that radio and tv can 
sell their sponsors' products and serv- 
ices, so why aren't they used more fre- 
quently to sell each other. Jointly- 
owned operations with an eye for econ- 
omy and an understanding of both 
media can not only build an audience 
but draw from the competitor by 
cross-plugging. 

I believe that most operations where 
both the radio and tv station are joint- 
ly owned do cross-plug — and with a 
high degree of effectiveness. 



Harry Mooradian, gen. sales i 

KGBT & KGB-TV, Harlingen 



Cost-plugging 
can build an 
audience 



Yes, I believe stations under dual own- 
ership should cross-plug. Nationally, 
there are conditions and situations that 
prevail in some operations that make it 
impossible. Of course, they are rare. 
Stations with a dual setup which 
don't cross-plug are missing a most 
potent and economical means of secur- 
ing more viewer/listenership. These 
operations either have overpowering 
policy reasons against it or have never 
realized its potential. 
- Where cross-plugging does exist it 
meets with high praise. Probably for 
the same reasons KGBT & KGBT-TV, 
Harlingen, Texas have continued to 
use it. 

i Please turn to page 94) 





IT'S NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND'S 

TOP MARKET WITH A 
BILLION DOLLARS PLUS TO SPEND 

SEE YOUR WEED TV MAN 
AND GET YOUR SHARE ^ 

WCSH-TV O 



Portland, Maine 



A RINES STATION 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



T.P.T.LS.N. 

brings 
thexn 
back 

alive!^ ^ 





<6 THIS GAS 
GIVES MORE MILEAGE!" 

WCX-TV romnifTcials get results 
because WGN-TV programming 
keeps folks watching. For proof, 
let our specialists fill you in on 
some WGN-TV case histories and 
discuss your sales problems. 

Put "GEE" in your Chicago sales with 

W©iM-TV 

Channel 9 — Chicago 




National and regional spot buys 
in ivork now or recently completed 



^ SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, is initiating a campaign 
for its Oxydol. The campaign starts 15 September, runs for the 
contract year. Minutes during nighttime periods are being sched- 
uled frequency depends upon the market. The buyers are Walter 
Teize and Pat Hawley; the agency is Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., 
New York. 

American Home Products Corp., Whitehall Pharmacal Co., 

New York, as yet has not completed its buying on Anacin. Buying 
is in both major and minor markets. Minutes during nighttime slots 
are being lined up; frequencies vary. The buyer is Jim Curran; the 
agency is Ted Bates, Inc., New York. 

Block Drug Co., Inc., Jersey City, N. J., is going into top markets 
for its Rem cough medicine. The campaign starts 15 September; 



•J minutes during nighttime periods are being used. Frequency depends 
upon the market. The buyer is Al Sessions; the agency is Lawrence 
C. Gumbinner, New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

;J Western Greyhound Lines, San Francisco, is going into West 
Coast markets to promote fall bus travel. The schedule starts 15 Sep- 
tember for nine to 13 weeks, depending upon the market. Daytime 
; and nighttime minutes and packages are being used, during traffic 
S times; frequency varies from market to market. The buyer is Joan 
I Rutman; the agency is Grey Advertising Agency, New York. 

1 McCormick & Co., Inc., Baltimore, is entering top markets for its 
j Fluffy Instant Mashed potatoes. The eight-week campaign starts 15 
'i September. Minutes during daytime slots are being aired; frequency 
1 depends upon the market. The buyer is Bob Widholm; the agency is 
Doherty, Clifford Steers & Shenfield, Inc., New York. 

RADIO and TV BUYS 

J. H. Filbert, Inc., New York, is planning a radio/tv campaign for 
. ', its Mrs. Filbert's Margarine. Start date is uncertain, but will prob- 
■'' ably be late September or early October. The schedule will be for 
eight weeks. In tv, daytime and nighttime minutes, chainbreaks and 
I.D.'s will be bought; in radio, daytime minutes. Frequencies will 
vary from market to market. The buyer is Don Ross; the agency is 
Suliivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, Inc.. New York. 

RADIO RESULTS 

United Fruit Co., New York, is kicking off its banana campaign 
in top markets. The schedules start 15 September, run for 10 weeks. 
Minutes and 20's during daytime slots are being scheduled; fre- 
quency varies from market to market. The buyer is Ted Wallower; 
the agency is Benton & Bowles, Inc., New York. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^ 



NEWS & IDEA 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Boiioiiin's Turkish Tiiffy. product 
of the (iold Medal Candy Corp., 
mapped out its fall advertising 
budget, with a 100% inerease 
over last year. 

Its tv campaign was launched this 
week, with more than 20 new markets 
added and penetrating, for the first 
time, metropolitan centers in southern 
and Pacific coast regions, as well as 
additional states in the midwest. 

Last year, Bonomo's campaign 
centered in markets east of the Mis- 
sissippi only. 

Agency: Emil Mogul. 

Other new campaigns include these: 



• La Rosa, launching its largest 
ad campaign with saturation tv and 
radio, to be tied in with a contest 
offering more than 1485 prizes. Mar- 
kets scheduled for this: New York, 
New Jersey, Albany, Baltimore, New 
Haven, Hartford. Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh and Providence. Agency: Hicks 
& Greist. 

• Du Pont will mark the ap- 
proach of winter with a concentrated 
campaign via network and local tv for 
its Zerex anti-freeze. Beginning next 
week, and continuing through 9 No- 
vember, the company will participate 
on the Steve Allen Show (NBC TV), 
and in a sports program See The 
Pros, to be shown in selected markets 



throughout the country. 

• Scott Paper Co. has realigned 
its fall tv schedules, giving it a dom- 
inant 546 commercial minutes this 
season, as compared to 156 minutes 
last season. Leading off is the Father 
Knows Best series, and then participa- 
tions on the daytime Play Your Hunch, 
Love of Life, Verdict is Yours and 
Secret Storm shows, all on CBS TV. 

• Bell Telephone will use the 
month of October to promote its bed- 
room extension phones, with one of 
the most concentrated sales drives in 
its history. Plans include radio and 
tv spots, supplemented by newspapers 
and magazines. 

• Ralston Purina Co., starts its 
campaign the end of this month for 
its hot and cold cereals, via Bold 
Journey ( ABC TV ) , saturated radio 
spots in 10 major markets, and print. 
Agency: Guild, Bascom & Bonfigii, 
San Francisco. 

Pillsbury has cleared the way for 
diversification outside the milling busi- 



1^^^^ 



PICTURE 
l^ WRAP-UP 





Mis.s IVach.s & Cr.iiin, M.iil- „( In 
(1 to r) Hill Hainlrr. K( Tl. '(akiiiia; 
KJR, Seattle; Hal Sinin...n>. KIT, Va 



Momid.-d by (l.j.'s who chose her 
inpson, KOL, Seattle; Gil Henr> 
.nd Frosty Fowler, KING, SeattI 



Rep service to agencies is demonstrated by host Howdee 
Meyers, of Venard, Rintoul & McConnell as he propels Jim 
Mayfield, of D'Arcy, around pool at second annual pool and 
picnic party given St. Louis ad people by rep firm, V,R&M 

Sealed with handshake: Frank Headley (2nd 1), pres.. 
H-R Tv, Inc.. Frdzier Reams, pies.. \VTOL-TV, Toledo 




It has dropped the "Mills" 
from its name, and become The 
Pillsbury Co. 

Merger: The Squire Dingee Co.. 
Chicago, and Beatrice Food Co. 

Squire Dingee, producers of pickle 
and jellies under the "Ma Brown' 
brand, will retain its identity with the 
same officers, management, products 
brand names, distribution and manu 
facturing plants. 

Strictly personnel: Walter Green 
wood, appointed manager of market- 
ing for the General Electric Receiv 
Tube Department . . . Joseph Oster- 
man, named Chicago district repre- 
sentative of the Electric Auto-Lite Co.'s 
Electrical Products Group. 

AGENCIES 

The J. H. Filbert account, which 
last year spent about S300,000 in 
spot tv, has quit SSCB for \&R. 



Seems that SSCB and the new mar- 
keting authorities at Filbert haven't 
been seeing eye to eye. The account 
is budgeted at around $1.5 mil- 
lion. 

Agency appointments: Warwick & 
Legler, for Mennen's Spray Deoder- 
ant and Speed Stick for men. Last 
June, W&L got Mennen's Skin Bracer, 
Cologne for Men, and its new Gold 
Crest Toiletries gift line, bringing the 
total Mennen business at the agency 
to S3 million . . . Ketchum, Mac- 
Leod & Grove, for the Scott Paper 
Co.'s Hollingsworth & Whitney divi- 
sion. KM&G presently handles Scott's 
Industrial Packaged Products, Dura- 
Weve, and Foam divisions, and prod- 
uct publicity on its consumer products 
. . . Leo Burnett, for Phillip Morris' 
Mayfield Menthol Cigarette . . . 
Keyes, Madden & Jones, for Oral 
Roberts Evangelistic Association . . . 

Add more re appointments : Fuller 
& Smith & Ross, for Cool-Ray. Inc. 



of Chelsea, Mass . . . Calkins & Hoi- 
den, for Duofold, Inc., Mohawk, N.Y.. 
manufacturer of underwear and outer- 
v/ear . . . Daniel F. Sullivan, Boston 
for Clicquot Club Co., Millis, Mass . . . 
Powell, Schoenbrod and Hall, 
Chicago, for the newly created 
Slenderella Hosiery division of Mun- 
singwear, Inc., Minneapolis . . . Ab- 
bott & Earl, Inc., Houston, for 
Southern Fabricators Corp., Shreve- 
port . . . Cole Fischer & Rogow, 
Beverly Hills, for Zia of California. 

Thisa and Data: James Kelly, v.p. 
of Ellington & Co., joins the regiment 
of Madison Avenue novelists. He'll 
have a novel. The Insider (Holt), with 
an ad business theme, coming out next 
month. 

They're expanding their quarters : 

J. E. LaShay & Co., Chicago, has 
moved its offices to N. State St., and 
changed its name to Shaffer, Lazarus 
and LaShay, Inc. . . . The Detroit 
office of Jaqua Advertising, has 




99 years of Dr. G. H. Tichenor Anti- 
septic Co. is celebrated by (1 to r) 
James Noe, Jr., v.p., James A. Noe Ra- 
dio; James Odom, v.p., Robert Moore 
Parker, pres., Dr. Tichenor's; John Vath, 
sis. mgr., WWL, New Orleans; Aubrey 
Williams, pres., A. Williams Advertising 



The cat and the mouse: Kitirik, star 
of Kitirik's Party, KTRK-TV, Houston, 
visits "Mickey Mouse" at Walt Disney 
sets in Hollywood as guest of ABC TV 



Shooting at San Quentin are the film 
and sound crew of KNXT, Los Angeles, 
for hour-long factual program dubbed 
Thou Shalt Not Kill. Crew shot at "Que" 
for two days, interviewing the inmates 



moved to larjier offices at 817 Pen- 
obscot Buildiiifi. 

They became v.p.'s: Harry L. 
Case, elected a v.p. of Creamer-Trow- 
bridge Co., Providence . . . Robert 
Hawkins, v.p. and account supervisor, 
Western Advertising, Chicago . . . 
Jerome Greenberg, v.p. at Scheck 
Advertising. Newark . . . Robert Cun- 
ningham, v.p. at William Schaller 
Co., West Hartford. 

Other agency personnel moves: 
Harold Cabot, named chairman of 
the board and Edward Chase, presi- 
dent and treasurer of Harold Cabot 
& Co.. Boston . . . Ralph Yambert, 
named manager of the west coast 
operation of MacManus. John & Adams 
. . . H. Taylor Protheroe, general 
manager. Cobak-Jessop Advertising, 
Akron . . . Robert Soderberg, to the 
Hollywood office of B&B as an agency 
producer . . . Harold McCormick, 
account manager, D-F-S . . . George 
Lucas, copy supervisor, VanSant, 
Dugdale & Co., Baltimore . . . Ralph 
Braun, director of public relations, 
Hazard Advertising, New York . . . 
Donald Daigh, director of the tv/ 
radio department. Henderson Advertis- 
ing, Greenville, S.C. 

More on the move: Allan damage, 

copywriter in the Detroit office and 
IN'orman Church, account executive 
in the Hollywood office of Grant . . . 
James Cornell, to the tv/radio de- 
partment of N. W. Ayer & Son as pro- 
gram analyst . . . H. T. Eckhardt, 
account supervisor, W. S. Walker Ad- 
vertising. Pittsburgh . . . John Roth, 



accDunt executi\e. Hicks & Greist . . . 
Phil MacMurray, to the creative 
staff, Daniel F. Sullivan Co., Boston 
. . . Patrick Comer Jr., director of 
marketing and research. Hege, Middle- 
ton & Neal Advertising. Greensboro, 
N. C. . . . Clyde Rapp, account 
executive and manager of the Dayton 
office, D-F-S . . . Joel Harvey, pro- 
duction manager in the Los Angeles 
office, K&E . . . Kay Ostrander, to 
.•\nderson-McConnell, Los Angeles, as 
media supervisor . . . Newt Mitzman, 
manager of commercial production in 
the tv/radio department. Ogilvy, Ben- 
son & Mather . . . Bart West, to the 
creative staff of McCann-Erickson . . . 
Jacquelin Molinaro, media buyer, 
Donahue & Coe. Los Angeles . . . 
Dick Schild, to the creative staff, 
Charles Anthony Gross Advertising, 
Miami. 

NETWORKS 

All four radio networks combined 
to do a closed-circuit broadcast 
re the Pepsi-Cola announcement 
campaign beginning next week 
(17 September). 

This was the first time that the 
major networks have produced a 
broadcast of this type. It featured, 
along with the top men from each 
web, Pepsi's new "Refreshment Song." 

Pepsi's saturation radio campaign 
will last through Christmas, and in- 
volves 489 million commercial minutes 
of radio time. 

The broadcast went to all network 
affiliates. 

Here's how the RAB ranks the lead- 



ing network radio users for the seconc 


1958 


quarter, as based on time pur- 


chased: 


1 


Bristol-Myers 


2 


Ford 


3 


General Motors 


4 


Midas Mufflers 


.5 


R. J. Reynolds 


6 


Brown & Williamson 


7 


General Mills 


8 


William Wrigley 


9 


Pabst 


10 


Plough 


11 


Exlax 


12 


California Packing 


13 


Colgate 


14 


Hudson Vitamine 


1.5 


AFL-CIO 


16 


American Motors 


17 


Lewis Howe 


18 


Hertz 


19 


American Optical 


20 


Liggett & Myers 



How the specials did : Nielsen re- 
ports a 25.8% average audience rat- 
ing for all specials aired last season 
(September-March) . 

By program type, they ranged from 
a 15.9 for the eight documentaries, to 
a 33.0 for the 13 comedies. The most 
numerous group 118 varieties) aver- 
aged 25.4 while the 11 dramas were 
clocked at 24.8. 

( For a table and commentary on this 
\ ear's specials, see page 44 t 

Campaign: As part of its Memory 
Vision campaign, NBC Radio is send- 
ing out a new kind of presentation to 
promote its evening show, Nightline. 
The brochure contains six pieces of 
abstract art. designed to match the 




That's Why 

NOBODY FROM NOWHERE 

Can Saturate 

TOPEKA 

like 

AVIBW-TV 

SATURATES TOPEKA 



Topeka has 1 TV Station ^VIB^A/-TV Js it 



ALL DAY— ANY DAY 



Here's why survey-proved WIBW-TV is your best buy for 
complete coverage of the eritire Topeka market. 
. WIBW-TV commonds the viewing audience. Note current 
survey figures: 

Shore of Audience Monday-Sunday 
7:45-12 N. 12N.-6p.m. 6 p.m. -12 Mid. 

57.0% 50.3% 51.1% 



Survey Figures 

Prove 

WIBW-TV's Value 



> of Audience 



WIBW-TV, TOPEI 
Sla. A, Konsos City 10. 
Sto. B, Konsos City 6. 
Sto. C, Konsos City 13. 



57.0""o 50.3% 51.1% 




Topeka, Kansas 



SPO.NSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 19.58 



36% of KRHM-FM listeners have annual incomes over $10,000 a yea' 

-70% make over $7,000 a year. The money is there. Another thing, these people are at the age of acquisition 

—nearly 89% are between the ages of 21 and 49. They are buying homes— furniture— automobiles. 

They are raising families— buying food, clothes, recreation 

A recent independent study easily verifies these points. ' 

These discriminating listeners choose FM for the kind of programminc, 

not generally offered elsewhere. These are loyal and appreciative 

listeners with high interest in their favorite music. They listen to Milton Cross 

on KRHM-FM who leads an ever increasing number of them to new musical experience, 

Ask The John E. Pearson Company about the krhm-fm audience 



Programming designed for FM circulation to America's finest liomes 

Tfie IVIilton Cross Sliow produced for KRI-iM-FIVI is aisc 

available on FM in major marl<ets 

throughout the country 



kk 



Milton Cross 

brings me into 
America's finest homes 



^•) 





^6 THIS FLOOR 
WAX REALLY SHINES!" 

WGN-TV commercials got results 
because WGN-TV programming 
keeps folks watching. For proof, 
let our specialists fill you in on 
some W(;X-TV case histories and 
discuss your sales problems. 



nyoi 



r Chicago sales with 



W©N-TV 

Channel 9 — Chicago 



JACKSON, 
MISSISSIPPI 

is the rfl market buy! 

BUSINESS TREND lists Jack- 
son as city with most im- 
provement (9 point gain) 



FORBES lists Jackson as lead- 
ing the top 10 cities in busi- 
ness gain over last year. 



U. S. NEWS AND WORLD 
REPORT lists Jackson among 
"Cities where Business is 



WJTV 

CHANNEL 12 

is fhe best media 
buy in Jackson! 



REPRESENTED BY KATZ 



copy terms used in describing the 
program: tuneful, thoughtful, humor- 
ous, informal, vital and personal. 
These designs were put through a m.r. 
test to determine whether they fit into 
the mood of the copy. 

ABC will broadcast for a couple 
weeks stereophonic music to its tv and 
radio audience in five cities via its 
Laurence Welk Plymouth Show. This 
experimental "first" requires the home 
viewer to tune in the music on his 
tv and radio sets. 

I Network sales: Lever Bros., for 

three daytime NBC TV shows, exceed- 
ing $2 million. The shows: Country 
1 Fair, Treasure Hunt and Haggis 
' Baggis . . . The Sweets Co. of Amer- 
ica, for two segments of ABC TV's 
Mickey Mouse Club, in addition to 
Tales of the Texas Rangers. Agency: 
Henry Eisen. 

FILM 

Schlitz (through JWT) has made 
another large regional syndication 
buy. 

The buy: CNP's Flight in more than 
20 southern and southwestern markets. 

Other initial buyers for the new 
series: F&M Schaefer (BBDO), for 
Philadelphia. New Haven and Albany; 
Kroger Co. (Campbell-Mithun) , in 
the southeast; General Electric, 
Louisville; and the Triangle stations. 

Other sales: 

• Three eight-market regional buys 
have helped up Screen Gems Rescue 
8 market total to 75. I See FILM- 
SCOPE, 6 Sept.) 

Buyers include: West End Brew- 
ing, for Utica Club Beer, in eight New 
York State markets; Prince Maca- 
roni, eight New England markets; 
Weingarten Markets, eight Texas 
markets. 

Also, Purity Biscuit Co., two 
Arizona markets; Miles Labs, six 
west coast markets; Salt Lake Mat- 
tress Co., Salt Lake; Millers Mar- 
kets and Carter Petroleum, Den- 
ver; Boynton Bros. Tires, Bakers- 
field; Crescent Creamery, Reno; 
Producers' Dairy, Fresno. 

Miller Brewing and Pan Ameri- 
can Bank, Miami; San Antonio 
Savings, San Antonio; Househohl 
Finance, Buffalo; Super Duper 
Markets, Columbus; IGA, St. Louis; 
Big Eight Stores, El Paso. 




HOUSTON'S 

FAMILY 

STATION! 



KTRK-TV,cl.annell3 



SCRAIInsMMORNING SHOW 



^^STATION^^ \sTATI0NB7 

k 11% MmnX ificv / 



'OAictAeeiwo 



SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA 



SPONSOR • 13 SEi'Tn;MBi:R 1958 



acceptance 




WCCO Radio delivers. . . 

MORE ADULT LISTENERS than all other Minneapolis- 

St. Paul stations combined!! 

MORE MARKET . . . 1,014,720 radio families in 114 basic area 

counties of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and South Dakota. 

MORE ACCEPTANCE through vitality of modern 

programming for the audience you want to reach. 

Call or write for full facts. 



Nothing sells like acceptance . 



WCCO 

MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 

The Northwest's^ Only 50,000-Watt 1-A Clear Channel Station 
Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



Radio 



e, 1958 /Station Total, 6 




OUR PUP 
GOES FOR THAT DOG FOOD!" 

^VGN-T\' commercials get results 
because WGN-TV programming 
keeps folks watching. For proof, 
let our specialists fill you in on 
some WGN-TV case histories and 
discuss your sales problems. 
Puf "GEE!" in your Chicago sales with 

W©IM-TV 

Channel 9 — Chicago 



Things you should know 
about 

KMSO 

• 191,000 WATTS POWER 

* CBS, ABC, NBC PROGRAMS 

* SINGLE STATION MARKET 

• 45,000 TV FAMILIES 

* LESS THAN 1^° PER M 

* SUPER SHOWMANSHIP 

* SUPER SALESMANSHIP 

* SUPER CRAFTSMANSHIP 

. . . and now that you know 
CALL OR WRITE 

CILL-PERNA— OR 
KMSO channel 13 

MISSOULA, MONTANA 



Ten stations have also bought the 
series. 

• Thirteen new renewals for ABC 
Film's 26 Men have brought the mar- 
ket tally to 44. 

Among the renewing sponsors are 
Coca-Cola, Pac-a-Sac Stores, Mol- 
son's Brewery, El Paso Mutual 
Federal Savings and Loan, and S. 
H. Deroy Jewelers. 

• The five Triangle stations this 
week bought segments of AAP's Gold 
Mine Library. Other features were pur- 
chased by KMTV, Omaha, WESH- 
TV, Daytona Beach; WGEM-TV, 
Quincy;WJRT.TV, Flint; WZKO- 
TV, Kalamazoo. In addition, WSOC- 
TV, Charlotte, bought segments of the 
Johnny Jupiter series. 

In the foreign markets: 

TPA is negotiating with several 
Iron Curtain countries for film ex- 
changes. 

Foreign operations v.p. Manny 
Reiner returned this week from meet- 
ings with Russian, Czechoslovakian 
and Polish tv officials. All expressed 
interest primarily in two TPA shows: 
Lassie and Fury. 

Here's where negotiations stand in 
each of the three countries: 

• Russians are not yet making 
any deals, although negotiations 
have begun. 

• Czechoslovakia has worked 
out a specific agreement with 
TPA, and officials are now awaiting a 
formal go-ahead. First trade would be 
for a series of 13 Czech films. 

• An exchange with Poland is 
still in the talking stage. 

Strictly personnel: Richard P. 
Moran, Jr., named account executive, 
CBS TV Film. He'll be covering 
Indiana . . . Stan Levine, appointed 
press editor. CNP. 

RADIO STATIONS 

KREM, Spokane, is tooting its 
whistle as a lost steer rounder- 
upper. The station recovered three of 
them for a couple in Fairfield, Wash., 
who discovered, one morning, that they 
(the steers) had wandered away. 

Success story: Dick Sinclair's Polka 
Party, on KFI, Los Angeles, started as 
a 15 minute show back in 1953; in 
1951, it was lengthened to 30-minutes; 
in 1955 another 30 minutes was added; 



in 1956, it bocams a two hour show; 
in 1957, Dick Sinclair was spinning 
platters for three hours ; and today, an- 
other hour has been added on Saturday 
evening. 

KFI holds this as proof that the 
Polka and it's varied tangents has its 
roots with the listener's of Southern 
California. 

If Mohammed won't go to the 
mountain, here's how the moun- 
tain comes to him: Last week, 
WBBM, Chicago, staged a "talent air- 
lift," flying nine of its top personalities 
out to Minneapolis to outline the sta- 
tion's broadcasting philosophy to a 
Minneapolis agency group. 

Covering the news: Just moments 
after a recent armed robbery in Colum- 
bus, WMNI had its news director on 
the scene, and scored an exclusive 
interview with the manager of the 
robbed finance company. 
Airing the editorials: WIP, Phil- 
adelphia, started expressing its opinion 
on vital subjects this week, with an 
editorial in favor of civil defense . . . 
KXOK, St. Louis, also aired its first 
"radiotorial" urging the city against 




^l^^M/0% 




• 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Radio for 

EVELAND ^"^^ 

ROWNS ALL AGES 



WGAR 



PAINESVILLE 



LORAIN CLEVELAND 



b 



AKRON 



WOOSTER CANTON 



NEW PHILADELPHIA 



STEUBENVILLE 



We offer you a large share of 
the Northeastern Ohio buying audience 



You reach Northeastern Ohio's real 
buying audience through WGAR. 
Because WGAR surrounds your 
commercials with radio for grown- 
_ups ... of all ages. 

For example, this fall, WGAR pre- 
sents professional football at its excit- 
ing best featuring the Cleveland 
Browns. Dynamically reported for 
Northeastern Ohio's big sports-minded 
radio audience by top sportscaster Bill 



McColgan . . . whose colorful game 
descriptions are seats on the 50-yard 
line for thousands of the Browns' faith- 
ful and enthusiastic fans. 
WGAR maintains this policy in all 
its programming . . . good music . . . 
variety shows . . . sports . . . accurate 
news coverage . . . drama — featuring 
performers from top CBS talent. 
So reach your real buying audience 
through WGAR. 



Radio for grown-ups 
. o . of all ages 

WGAR 

CLEVELAND OHIO'' 

The Peoples Broadcasting Corporation 

WRFD-Worthington, O. • WTTM-Trenton, N. J. 

WMMN-Fairmont, W. Vo. • WNAA-Yankton, S. D. 

KVTV-Sioux City, la. 

^Represented by the Henry I. Christal Company 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



adopting a reduced garbage collection 
recommendation. 

Station transfers: KRAM, Las 

Vegas, sold to Anthony Morici and 
A. R. Ellman, owners of KIST, Santa 
Barbara . . . KCMR, McCamey, Texas, 
to Robert E. Stuart, Dallas manager 
for Clarke Brown Co. (Brokered by 
Hamilton. Stubblefield, Twining & 
Associates.) Change in call letters: 
KTSA. a pioneer in San Antonia since 
1922. gave way this week to KAKI, 
which will continue under the same 
ownership — The McLendon Corp. 

Promotion ideas at work: 

• Chuck Breece, d.j. on WFBM, In- 
dianapolis, has just completed a four- 
block measuring stint — hot dog, by hot 
dog. It all started when he announced 
a contest on his show, to guess the 
number of hot dogs it would take to 
stretch from the WFBM radio studios 
to the Hi-Fi distributors, four blocks 
away. Winner received a year's supply 
of hot dogs. 

• Station manager, Dave Froh. of 



WTLS, Lansing, aired a "first" live 
broadcast from a jet bomber. Flying at 
speeds up to 600 miles-an-hour, he set 
up direct communication with the sta- 
tion, and described the sights to lis- 
teners. 

• WMET, Miami, is sending out 
its first progress report, after two 
months of active ownership and man- 
agement. Enclosed with it, is the sta- 
tion's new rate card, and a list of 
studies it made, new programing it 
plans, and recent advertisers on the 
station. 

• WIP, Philadelphia, launched its 
attack on rock "n roll last week, by de- 
voting an entire day to the listenable 
sounds of big bands only — old and 
new. Also featured was live, tape and 
beep-phone interviews with leading big 
band personalities. 

Anniversary: WWRL, New York, 
celebrates 32 years of broadcasting 
under the same management and own- 
ership. A special Homecoming party 
was held at the station for the occasion. 
Station staffers: Tom Thuman, 



MEET K. A. CASEY 

Kans. 



in Mkme 



r 

I in News 




** 



I'\vcnty-t\vo (22; consecutive montlis of being FIRST in every 
^ . . Tulsa survey (Hooper or Pulse)! An overwhelming FIRST we 

/might modestly add. KAKC has an audience as big as the 
next two Tulsa stations combined, and with a rate lower than 
either. Your cost-per-thousand is so low it's almost free! 

** l^i Recipient of the coveted Associated Press Award for best news 
coverage in 1957 of all A. P. radio and tv stations. 




P 




^^A PUBLIC RADIO CORPORATION STATION 
The New KAKC - 1st in Tulsa 
The New KIOA - 1st in Des Moines 



appointed general manager of WORD. 
Spartanburg . . . Ray Owen, general 
manager, KCEE, Tucson . . . Edward 
Kemp, program-production manager 
for KDYL, Salt Lake City . . . Paul 
Kasander, named promotion man- 
ager for WABC, New York . . . Ray 
Colonair, local sales manager and 
director of community relations, 
WICC, Bridgeport . . . George Berke- 
ley, news director, WILD, Boston . . . 
Robert Hodges, to he sales staff, 
WJBK, Detroit . . . Elliott Litt, pro- 
gram director, KPAL, Palm Springs 
. . . Larry Lane, account executive 
at WTTM, Trenton, N. J. 

TV STATIONS 

WBTV, Charlotte, racked up a 
first this week: the first tv station 
to tape a program in color and 
play it back on the air. 

The program. The Betty Freezor 
Show, was taped on an RCA color 
video tape recorder, and played back 
an hour later. (See Special Report on 
Videotape, page 40.) 

The Oklahoma Criminal Court of 
Appeals affirmed the right of tv 
cameras to cover court trials. 

The defendant in a burglary case 
had appealed the jury's verdict on the 
grounds that his rights were jeopard- 
ized by the admission of tv cameras 
in court. 

The NAB, concurring with the 
court's opinion, hailed this decision, 
which gives radio and tv equal status 
with the press in covering court trials. 

BAR is extending its tv monitoring 
activities to include additional 
230 tv stations in 100 city areas. 

This raises the total number of BAR 
monitored stations to 312. 

One of the major features of this ex- 
tension will be the monitoring of local 
breaks around prime network pro- 
Each of the 100 new markets will be 
monitored four times a year. 

KTTV, Los Angeles, has climaxed 
its IS-months research project 
with the development of a satura- 
tion package. 

The plan: A single sponsor, by uti- 
lizing eight syndicated programs, can 
reach 85-95% of Southern California 
homes during a four-week period. 

To service twice the number of spon- 
{ Please turn to page 92) 



13 SKPTEMBER 1958 



// 



to sell th^ most Hoosiers 
be sure ybui' product 



is cooking in the}iiotfest pot! 



nLi 




every minute is a selling minute on WFBM 



• First all day , . . "most listened to" and 
hottest of any as indicated by recent audience 

studies!* 

Why ? Because WFBM sounds good to Hoosiers 
—fresh, exciting and neighborly. It's the "go- 
ingest and growingest" station in the market! 
City's biggest news staff of 12 men and 3 
mobile units keep WFBM's audience best in- 
formed. Hot local news gets on-the-spot priority 
handling . . . fast-moving world-wide coverage 



by exclusive WFBM-TIME Washington News 

Bureau. 

Top personaHties are warmly human, strongly 

appealing. Their audiences grow week after week 

. . . and remain attracted to WFBM's popular, 

more diversified programming. 

You have every reason to place saturation spot 

campaigns here, where you reach an even larger 

cumulative audience. Check WFBM first — where 

every minute is a selling minute! 



* C. E. Hooper, Inc. (7a.m.- 6 p.m.) June ,1958 
Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



a>e umnialkm^ ohcnd^^hhiidMlvK ammz^daU , 




(^^tktnamtCadcaJU 



cams^LW. 



Cascade P.cfures of Californ.a, Inc., 1027 No. Seward St.. Hollywood 38. Calif.. HO 2-6481 




Marketing tools, trends, 
research data and trade tips 



^ FILM-SCOPE 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Two more national advertisers are seriously considering syndication as their 
next tv strategy. 

Advertiser #1: Pepsi-Cola, via Kenyon & Eckhardt. Pepsi just bought a heavy radio 
schedule, and is considering syndication as its tv move (since its original plans for a spec- 
tacular were cancelled) . 

Advertiser #2: Dow-Chemical, via MacManus, John and Adams. Although no presenta- 
tion has yet been made to the client, the agency thinks syndication is a natural tactic for 
next year. 

First-run syndication will be the heavy ammunition in a pending battle among 
four brewers for leadership in the Chicago market. 

All but one have picked half-hour films as their tv weapons. 
The brands and their local tv strategy : 

• MILLER HIGH LIFE: Two half-hour shows per week on WGN-TV. 

• SCHLITZ: Three half -hour shows on WNBQ and one half-hour on WGN-TV. 

• BUDWEISER: A half -hour weekly on WBKB. 

• HAMM: The exception to a syndication policy, Hamm is spending about $6,000 a 
week for minutes at night, along with supplementary other-type schedules. 

Those dribbles of new-to-tv pre-'48 features that are coming from major distributors 
are being snatched up by stations as soon as they're made available. 
The obvious reason: To freshen fading feature film stockpiles. 
Two more packages were made available this week. Included are: 

• About 50 additional Warner Films, from AAP, that were originally held back for 
theatrical re-release. 

• A new package of 86 20th Century features, from NTA. 

In addition there will be another package this fall from Screen Gems, which will include 
about 50 Columbias and Universals. 

(For an up-to-date report on how the current supply of features is holding up, see p. 
44) 



Nationwide Insurance won't be going into a new series until January, even 
though cut-off dates on its current Mama series have already started. 

Bulk of the cut-offs in its 36 markets will be December. Part of the reason for the delay: 
Nationwide's agency, Ben Sackheim, still can't find a new series that's as compatible with 
the product as Mama. 

Rheingold's buy (via Foote, Cone & Belding) of CBS TV Film's Rendevous 
in three eastern markets (New York, New Haven and Binghampton) was some- 
thing of a record in program costs. 

The brewery paid more than $10,000 for show alone (per episode) in the three mar- 
kets. 



You'll be seeing a lot more merchandising among banks that use syndication. 

Bankers, especially away from New York, are beginning to apply the latest techniques 
of promotion and exploitation in going after new business. 

(For further news on film developments see NEWS AND IDEA WRAP-UP, page 80.) 

SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 87 



Key trends and developments 
in marketing and research 



^ MARKETING WEEK 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 Tv and radio may soon be airing new cigarette themes. 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Reason : it looks like the bloom is off the filter sales boom. Filter sales for the second 

quarter were down from the first three months. But cigarette sales overall were not 
down. Brisk sales by Pall Mall was cited as one factor in the strong non-filter showing. 
The cigarette industry is particularly sensitive to changes in public taste and moves fast 
when smoking habits show a new trend. If filter sales don't pick up, look for new com- 
mercial approaches on the part of both filters and non-filters. 



Don't underestimate the marketing importance of the small specialty store, 
Grey Advertising warns. 

Marketers have become so enamored with the retail giants, the agency says in its month- 
ly letter, they are developing blind spots — particularly to the small store designed for 
60-second shoppers. 

The growth of such stores was ascribed to the failure of big retailers to offer con- 
sumers speed and convenience in shopping. 



The first national tv spot campaign by a men's hosiery maker will hit the con- 
sumer starting 22 September. 

The advertiser is Interwoven Stocking Co. Five markets have been bought: New York, 
Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Lancaster, Pa. Interwoven will use a song popu- 
lar in the SO's for its musical theme. Title: Happy Feet. 



Station merchandising can be too effective sometimes. 

Some station crews have become sharp enough to take orders from stores for ad- 
vertisers. This is strictly off-the-cuff, of course, and is confined to independent outlets. 

However, some stations have begun to complain that clients are beginning to 
expect this added service. So station men are trying to discourage it. It's an effective 
technique when used sparingly, said one station man, but can put an impossible burden on mer- 
chandising crews if advertisers come to consider it part of the station's regular merchandis- 
ing service. 



Highway retailing has been an important factor in bolstering auto radio lis- 
tening. 

And it looks like it's going to become even more of a factor. Doyle Dane Berbach's 
merchandising director, E. B. Weiss, calls highway retailing The Next Great Retailing 
Revolution. Weiss takes an in-depth look at this field in the eighth of his marketing and L 
merchandising studies published by the agency. I 

He describes a fast-growing trend on the part of retailers to open up in solo loea- | 
tions as opposed to the shopping center type of operation. Even the food super is I 
showing an interest in such locations, he says. a 

The food super's interest, Weiss concludes, shows it is satisfied it can — entirely by itself f 
— draw all the traffic required for a profitable food plus non-food operation. ', 

The growth in highway retailing means: more driving, more nighttime shop- i 
ping, more Sunday shopping, more drive-in shopping, more family shopping. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 195fli' 

,1 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The FCC returned from its August vacation to find that not a single one of 
its problems had evaporated while it was away. 

The Clear Channel case, the appeal of the daytimers for longer operating hours and 
the specific proposal to duplicate stations on half of the 24 clear channels were among the 
questions in the immediate mill. 

The Barrow Report remains to be acted upon, with its sweeping recommendations for 
changes in tv network practices. The section of the report dealing with programing is still 
awaited, however. 

Only in the case of allocations of tv channels does the Commission appear to have any- 
thing like a breathing spell. The final findings of the Television Allocations Study Organiza- 
tion as to the capabilities of UHF will not be available before the end of the year. 

The TASO report, aside from delving into what sort of coverage UHF can really pro- 
vide, will also concern interference problems, perhaps to the extent of shedding some light 
on plan such as that proposed by ABC to drop-in new VHP assignments at shorter distances. 



Another matter which is causing the Commission more concern than almost 
anything else took the center of the stage this week. 

Specially appointed FCC hearing examiner, retired Pennsylvania Supreme Court chief 
justice Horace Stern, kicked off the FCC's Miami channel 10 hearings. 

The hearings will rehash all the scandal dug up by the Harris House Commerce Legisla- 
tive Oversight subcommittee. The Appeals Court has directed the FCC to delve into whether 
any of the applicants should be disqualified because of improper activities in connection with 
the case. Also whether the final award to Public Service Television should be voided because 
ex-Commissioner Richard A. Mack should have disqualified himself from voting on the case. 

Public Service Television, National Airlines subsidiary, is not the only applicant under a 
cloud for allegedly improper approaches to Commissioners, although it did win out in the 
end. Losing applicant Col. A. Frank Katzentine is also in danger of disqualification. 

First stage of the hearings saw FCC assistant general counsel Edgar W. Holtz trying to 
establish that Katzentine had brought as much pressure to bear as he could. 

Katzentine was charged with seeing Mack twice, with having had a number of others 
contact the ex-commissioner, and with attempting to secure the aid of a number of Senators. 
Later on, the incredible dealings between Mack and Thurman Whiteside — retained by Na- 
tional Airlines — will be explored. 

The FCC is not particularly upset because it may be necessary to label these two appli- 
cants as miscreants. It appears to have been a time-honored custom to approach Commis- 
sioners off-the-record in contested cases. 

If the Public Service license must be cancelled, many other contested cases may be 
similarly reopened. 

Even while TASO solemnly measures uhf coverage and potentialities, and while 
the FCC keeps open its proposal to switch tv to uhf, the last remaining uhf lobby- 
ing group went on a part-time basis. 

The one-and-only employee of the Committee for Competitive Television, executive direc- 
tor Wallace Bradley took a full time job with the radio-tv center of Syracuse University. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



89 



A round-up of trade t4dks, 
trends and tips for admen 



^ SPONSOR HEARS 



13 SEPTEMBER 1958 Falslaff — mainly because of its production expansion — has nudged Ballantine out of 



CMyrlght 1958 
)0R PUBLICATIONS II 



its long-held position as No. 3 seller among beers. 

The top two, in that order, are Schlitz and Budweiser. 



If there's any broadcast organization that takes the motto "Plan Ahead" seriously it's 
CBS. 

In tv it operates on a five-year forecast, with the blueprint re\ ised each year. The 
original long-distance plan, .set up in 1948, was for 20 years. 



If you want an insigb* into how the print media are faring in the soap-toiletries 
field, note this: 

Benton & Bowles, which is the largest P&G agency, has but one P&G brand — 
Crest — currently in a major magazine campaign. 



The marketing director of a food account is observing with impatient eye his 
ad manager's tactics of playing the tv program executives of two of its agencies against 
each other. 

Already one of the agencies has felt that its own program man on the account wasn't 
taking the competition bitterly enough and has replaced him. The marketing direc- 
tor now feels that the intramural hubbub may be getting out of hand. 



If there's one feature that distinguishes Lever from P&G, it's the basic philoso- 
phy of production. 

P&G is in the business of producing products for itself, whereas Lever is more 
interested in keeping its plants running at capacity — even if somebody else's label ap- 
pears on the goods. 

Hence about .50% of the shortening Lever produces goes to private brands, which 
not only are in direct competition with but undersell its own brand. Spry. 



Sponsors of network tv plainly are not interested in the occult. 

CBS TV made the admission this week, noting that prospect after prospect during the 
recent selling season observed he would be glad to watch this type of show but that 
he wouldn't underwrite it. 

Among those put on the market this spring: 

Witchcraft, The Veil, Tales of Frankenstein, One Step Beyond, the Invisible Man, the 
World of Giants. 



Some of the long-lasting programs have interesting origins. Here's one: 
Truth or Consequences originally emerged from a sideshow which Compton staged 
with Ralph E<lwards, who was then one of its announcers, for a meeting of P&G dis- 
trict sales directors. 

Another piquant recollection about T or C: When the air version was put together, the 
producer recorded about 30 versions of the Bronx cheer before the one with the 
right pilch and implication was chosen. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 




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SPONSOR • 13 SEl'TEMBER 1958 



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WRAP-UP 

[ConI d from page 84) 

sors possible with a single eight-show 
package, KTTV is offering two undup- 
licated packages, "The Big Reach" and 
"Cover-All". 

Station application: Joseph Bryan, 
president of the Jefferson Standard 
Broadcasting Co. submitted, this week, 
an application to the FCC to construct 
and operate a $1.5 million tv station 
in Greensboro. 

The company, a wholly-owned sub- 
sidiary of Jefferson Standard Life In- 
surance Co., presently operates WBT 
AM & TV, Charlotte and WBTW-TV, 
Florence, S. C. 

For public service: WVEC-TV, 

Norfolk, offered to televise educational 
programs daily, in case the schools are 
closed during the intergration crisis. 
Paul Schweitzer, chairman of the 
Norfolk school board accepted the of- 
fer this week. 



Idea at work: In line with NBC-TV's 
"Vote for NBC" campaign, and the 
general political atmosphere of an elec- 
tion year, WFBM-TV, Indianapolis, 

has launched its audience promotion 
under the theme: "Mr. Six, Favorite 
Son in Indiana". 

Thisa and Data: WNTA-TV, New 

York, televised a two-hour spectacular 
last week, dubbed What Will Channel 
13 Be Made Of? The special produc- 
tion was designed to tell viewers what 
they'll be seeing during the coming 



Strictly personnel: Alvin Slep will 
head the newly consolidated publicity 
and exploitation departments of WRCA 
& WRCA-TV, New York; John 
O'Keefe remains as publicity manager 
. . . Keith Royer, named assistant 
promotion manager, KETV, Omaha 
. . . John Conley, general sales man- 
ager; Robert Pryor, director oj pro- 
motion and information services; John 
Dolphe, program director, at WCAU- 
TV Philadelphia . . . Nicholas Pitasi, 
named sales account exectuive, WABC- 
TV, New York . . . William Flynn, 
apointed national sales manager, Ken- 
neth Wilson, local sales manager and 
Henry Davis, program manager at 
WAGA-TV, Atlanta. ^ 



VIDEOTAPE 

{Contd from page 71) 

"We're attempting to reproduce ani- 
mated film commercials that are simple 
enough in technique to lend them- 
selves to videotape, and find that many 
animation effects may be achieved at 
greatly reduced cost." Among com- 
mercials KRON has taped are some 
for: Oscar Mayer Meat Products, Alka 
Seltzer, Nabisco, Dr. Ross Dog Food. 
Woolyn Soap, Regal Petroleum. A 
number of programs are being taped: 
outstanding examples: award-winning 
Science In Action series for American 
Trust Co. (Mc-E), and Sea Power For 
Peace produced with the Navy. Pro- 
gram was rehearsed and taped in one 
Friday evening. One tape was in Los 
Angeles the next day, two tapes in 
Washington, D. C. by Monday, a fourth 
was aired on KRON on Sunday. 

KING-TV, Seattle: One of the most 
dramatic moments in taping occurred 
during KING's coverage of the recent 
Gold Cup Races when a hydroplane 
went out of control at 160 m.p.h. and 
crashed a Coast Guard picket boat. 
The disaster sequence was immediately 
replayed for tv viewers. Tape also is 
a boon to KING advertisers. Thriftway 
Caravan, a variety series for Associat- 
ed Grocers scheduled for a nighttime 
slot when studio facilities were not 
normally available was made possible 
by daytime pre-taping. Some other 
clients who have been using tape are: 
Nabisco, Frederick & Nelson Dept. 
Store, Arthur Murray Studios, Block 
Shoe Stores, Union Oil, West Side 
Ford, Gold Shield Coffee. 

KOIN-TV, Portland, Ore.: This 
CBS affiliate reports "tape has brought 
a major change to most departments." 
It has practically eliminated the need 
for large technical staffs on weekends; 
early morning shows are being taped 
the afternoon before; "live" shows 
run back to back without crew prob- 
lems. The KOIN sales dept. also 
makes full use of tape for presenta- 
tions and auditions. 

WOR-TV, New York: Since June, 
when tape was put into use, more than 
a dozen clients and agencies have used 
WOR facilities for commercials. A 
lot of interest has been evidenced in 
tape by other sponsors — but not by 
sponsors new to WOR. Smaller clients, 
however, for whom film commercials 
have heretofore been economically pro- 



.SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 






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hibitive are now using tape. WOR re- 
ports that a number of sponsors have 
taken advantage of tape's flexibility to 
change commercials on a day's notice. 
In programing, videotape is already 
producing a regularly scheduled series, 
Don Mahoney and His Kiddie Troop- 
ers. Eventually the station hopes to get 
into syndication via tape. 

WNEW-TV (formerly WABD), 
New York: "In five years," says Ben- 
net Korn, vice president, "we will look 
back and say. 'How did we ever get 
along without tape'?" A number of 
advertisers with limited budgets that 
permitted only one or two commer- 
cial messages are now looking forward 
to a variety of commercials at reason- 
able cost. On the programing side, 
WNEW plans to seek out show pro- 
perties and talent for gyndication. 
"Prior to the advent of tape," says 
Korn, "it was impossible for local tv 
stations to financially compete for the 
services of top grade talent.'" 

WBKB, Chicago: This center of the 
ABC web in the midwest is the heart 
of the network's daylight saving opera- 
tion with six tape recorders. For the 
net, it tapes such shows as Polka-Go- 
Round, Stars of Jazz, Cowtown Rodeo, 
Confession, Midwest Hayride for delay- 
ed telecast. At the local level, WBKB 
is using the tape facilities for commer- 
cials and programing. One interesting 
use was demonstrated on 19 August 
when the staff was able to go on an 
annual outing because the entire day's 
programing had been pre-recorded. 

WBBM-TV, Chicago: At the mo- 
ment, this CBS o&o looks forward to its 
videotape equipment to effect eco- 
nomies in programing. "We can tape 
our weekend shows during a regular 
work week in studio dark times when 
the network feed is on," they say. 

WGN-TY, Chicago: Two recorders 
are now in operation, another is on 
order. The station reports "consider- 
able interest" on the part of agencies 
in its tape operation. WGN is now in 
the process of compiling a videotape 
rate card as a service to clients. In the 
area of syndication, however, the sta- 
tion which had been all set to go with 
Ding Dong School, suddenly thought 
better of it and withdrew. Reasons: 
difficulty at present in syndication lies 
in delay of development in duplication 
and distribution centers. ^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

{Cont'd from page 73) 

In a sense it is a public service, but 
more than that it is beneficial for both 
station and client. No person views/ 
listens to just one medium. In two-sta- 
tion markets such as Harlingen, cross- 
plugging takes on an even greater role. 

Most of the operations that deprecate 
the effectiveness of cross-plugging are 
of the opinion that you are "stealing 
from one pocket to put it in the other." 

The fact is it can build audience. A 
person who listens to your radio outlet 
does not necessarily view your tv out- 
let. Should he hear a plug on radio 
about a program of especial interest 
to him, he may skip his regular pro- 
gram on the competition and tune in 
you. This may be the beginning of 
steady tuning. The reverse holds just 
as true for a television plug. 

In summary, viewers or listeners 
have the oportunity of more selection, 
more information and more entertain- 
ment if stations inform them of what 
can be gained by the turn of a switch 
or the twist of a dial. It is also of im- 
portance to stations — it has won view- 
ers/listeners. ^ 




^6 THIS SOFT 
DRINK TASTES GOOD!" 

W(iN-TV coinnu'iTials get results 
because WGN-TV programming 
keeps folks watching. For proof, 
let our specialists fill you in on 
some WGN-TV case histories and 
discuss your sales problems. 

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SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



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Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



P. A. (Buddy) Sugg, who joined NBC as 
head of the o&o"s and the spot sales divi- 
sion in April, has been promoted to execu- 
tive v.p. along with Joe Culligan, top man 
of NBC Radio. Sugg, who has been in the 
business for about 30 years, working in all 
facets of station operation, management 
and development, came to NBC from the 
Oklahoma City Publishing group. There he 
served as general manager of WKY-TV-AM, Oklahoma; WSFA-TV, 
Montgomery, Ala., and WTVT, Tampa, Fla. Sugg got his start in 
radio as a control room engineer at KPO, San Francisco, in 1929. 
The next step was supervisor of NBC engineers in that city. He 
then moved to WKY as station manager in 1945. He is regarded 
as a conspicuously industry-minded executive of the business. 




w 



Morton L. Salan has been appointed a vice 
president of W. B. Doner & Co., advertis- 
ing, it has been announced by W. B. Doner, 
president. Headquartered in Baltimore, 
Salan is supervisor of many of the agency's 
local, regional and national accounts. In his 
new position he will assume additional ad- 
ministrative duties. Salan joined the agency 
last year after a seven-year association with 

the Joseph Katz Co. At Katz he was copywriter, then account exec 
until 1952 when he became radio/tv director. He was made general 
manager of the Baltimore office in 1956. Prior to joining Katz, 
Salan spent three years as production manager and copywriter for 
a small retail agency. He is a graduate of Baltimore City College. 



Pax Shaffer has been appointed sales man- 
ager of woe and WOC-TV, Davenport. la. 
according to a recent announcement by 
Ralph Evans, executive v.p. of Central 
Broadcasting Co. and Tri-City Broadcast- 
ing Co. Shaffer returns to Davenport from 
Chicago where he was director of the new 
business dept. for the Midwest office of 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, national radio/tv 
representatives for WOC-AM-FM-TV. Prior to joining PGW, Shaffer 
was vice president and partner in the L. W. Ramsey Advertising 
Agency in Davenport. A graduate of the State U. of Iowa, he has 
been active in the advertising field as a copywriter, account executive 
and consultant. With his wife and two children he resides in Glen- 
view, III., will shortly move to Davenport. He is a member of SRA. 



13 SEPTKMBER 19.58 





TAMPA- ST. PETERSBURG 

• • • market on the move! 



Important cargo is on the move in the MARKET ON 
THE MOVE —TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG— via swift, 
modern air transports that hnk the Twin Cities of the 
South with important world markets. Excellent air trans- 
portation facilities help spark the amazing industrial 
expansion in TAMPA- ST.PETERSBURG -NOW IN TOP 
30 MARKETS— 30th in retail sales, 27th in automotive 
sales, 29th in drug sales! 

'And, keeping pace, is the station on the move— WTVT 

—with 30 of the top 50 programs* — the station with 

top-rated CBS and local programs that blanket the 

MARKET ON THE MOVE —TAMPA- ST. PETERSBURG. 

*Latest ARB 



Station on the move... 

WTVT 

TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 
(^} Channel 13 



The WKY Television System, inc. 

WKY-TV I WKY-RADIO WSFA-TV 

Oldahoma City Olclalioma City Montgomery 

Represented by the Katz Agency 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Pooled public service 

The plan {)roposed by NBC Chairman of the Board Rol)ert 
Sarnoff to eliminate unwarranted duplication and triplication 
of public service programing by the tv networks has rapidly 
developed into a heated and healthy debate. 

Proponents of the plan cite the wasteful economics to both 
sponsors and networks of an unharnessed policy; the nega- 
tive aspects of a public service that sometimes (unneces- 
sarily) cuts off all but one program in a market. Opponents 
stress the damages in tampering with public service program- 
ing in any way; the importance of network competition at 
all times, even when it results in duplication; the problems 
inherent in one and two station markets. 

As we understand the plan nothing will prevent duplica- 
tion or even triplication of programing when, in the opinion 
of the networks, extra coverage is desirable. Pooling tech- 
niques so common in newspaper and magazine coverage can 
be frequently employed. What is involved basically is an 
inter-network committee that will weigh the merits of dupli- 
cation in each instance and reach a mutually acceptable 
decision. This decision will favor duplication and pooling 
techniques whenever necessary. 

Such a plan could well result in better (and perhaps more) 
public service offerings by the networks — and within the 
boundaries of simple business economics as well. 

Next Week— Chrysler's new air strategies 

In our next issue, sponsor's editors report in detail the 
new media and marketing planning that will accompany 
Chrysler Corporation's introduction of its 1959 line. 

You will want to read this story carefully, both for the 
light it throws on Detroit's forthcoming strategies and as a 
fascinating discussion of the methods used by one giant 
corporation in introducing and pre-selling its new models. 
Among other important facts: a new corporate concept built 
for Chrysler by Leo Burnett. 

THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Continuing and re- 
lentless pressure by agencies, advertisers, sta- 
tions and representatives, for greater simplifi- 
cation of spot radio and television buying 
and selling. Let's cut down the paper work. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Ultimate: Martin Katz, sales develop- 
ment director for Blair-Tv, has de- 
veloped a show of his own, certainly 
worth serious consideration bv the 
networks. It's called Name That Game. 
Four panelists must guess the identi- 
fication of film clips taken from all the 
game shows on tv. Prizes are spon- 
sors' merchandise from the other 
shows. Transportation is supplied by 
Greyhound Bus. 

Next idea: Another wag suggests a 
network tv series about a circuit judge 
to be titled, Have Gavel, Will TraveL 

Winner: The current D.A. investiga- 
tion into tv prizes which throws suspi- 
cion on tv winners has led to this 
Madison Avenue gag about that fellow 
who never loses — Wyatt Earp. "It's 
fixed," they say. 

Rocketry: A spaceman landed his fly- 
ing saucer on Chicago's Michigan Ave- 
nue bridge during a noon hour when 
it was crowded with agency people. 
His antennae bristled with rage and 
his little green face turned purple as 
he shouted, "Okay, which one of you 
promotion-minded wise guys sent up 
that mouse in a nose cone? It scared 
hell out of my wife!" 

Addendum: On the same subject and 
also from Chicago comes this one by 
Norman Ross, tv emcee: "When the 
mouse landed on Mars, his first utter- 
ance was, "Take me to your Lieder- 
kranz." 

Tv-guidance: A dump truck was ob- 
served the other day over in New 
Jersey which carried the names of two 
tv shows on the mud skirts of its rear 
fenders. On the left-hand side (okay 
for passing) the skirt bore the legend: 
"This is Your Life." The right-hand 
skirt said, "Medic." 

Beau jest: Columnist Earl Wilson 
said it: "What most people are looking 
for in a cigarette is a less-irritating 
commercial." 

The clock-watch: Madison Ave. 
executives whose secretaries arrive late 
are reported to be presenting them 
v/ith gift copies of the new kiddie 
book, "How to Tell Time" published 
by Simon & Schuster in cooperation 
with the Gruen Watch Co. The Cover 
features a Gruen clock face with 
movable hands which the boss can set 
at 9 o'clock. Don't punch the clock; 
punch the boss. 



SPONSOR • 13 SEPTEMDER 1958 




Indlpstrial Crescent 



f-T-: 



TT 



^ 



.^^i*^^ 



(defined, by the Ford Foundation) 

dominated by wfmy-tv 



^ 



Just \efhat is this area . ...this Piedmont Industrial Crescent? Defined by 
the Ford Foundation, it is a vast "area Laboratory/' stretching across 

North Carolina's fertiie Industrial Piedmont. It Is more, too. It-is a 
bustling, urban complex engaged in unsurpassed growth patterns of manufacturin 
distribution and marketing. Strategically centered at the hub of this massive 
urban market is WFMY-TV, the most powerful selling influence, by far. 



North Carolina's INTERURBIA^" 

At the very axis of the CRESCENT lies INTERURBIA . . . 

the largest metropolitan market in the two Carotinas. 
INTERURBIA plus the Piedmont CRESCENT where more than 
two million people are sold by WFMY-TV. 




■^ 



uifmi|-tv(J) 



GREENSBORO, N 



j|JiiiJAiiJAij.njimi.iJUAiiiiJiiiJ.iiiJJiJiiiiJJJiiJjiJUJiJ1jj;iMUii..iM.aii.i.w. 




. . . number one in America's 37tli TV market, reports Nielsen *3 

Now confirmed and certified by the Nielsen Coverage Survey #3, is the clear-cut domination by 
WSTV-TV Channel 9 of the prime Steubenville-Wheeling television market : 

• over 200,000 more TV homes covered than its nearest competitor • lowest cost-per-thousand, by far 
• highest TV set coverage in all total Nielsen survey categories: monthly, weekly, daily, daytime and evening 

For advertisers, WSTV-TV delivers deepest penetration into the 39 densely populated counties comprising 
the rich Upper Ohio Valley where retail sales hit $3,159,860,000. And only WSTV-TV offers FREE 
"Shopper-Topper" merchandising service — "promotion in motion" designed to move food store products in 
America's Steel and Coal Center. For more details, ask forour new "Shopper-Topper" brochure. 



A Member of the Friendly Group 

52 Vanderbilt Ave., N. Y. • 211 Smithfield St., Pittsburgh 

Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



ee 



WSTV-TV 

CHANNEL 9 • STEUBENVILLE-WHEELING 

"Best Buy by Any Known Source." 



20 SEPTEMBER 195|| 
20< a copy • $3 a yea 



PART ONE OF 2 PAKTS 



N3 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




you get greater 

FLEXIBILITY with SPOT-TV 

the basic advertising medium 






^ 



and hundreds of advertisers are using these 
great stations for their basic advertising: 



KOB-TV Albuquerque 

WSB-TV Ariania 

KERO-TV Bakertfield 

WBAl-TV Baltimore 

WGN-TV Chicago 

WFAA-TV Dallas 

WICU-TV Erie 

WNEM-TV Flint-Bay City 

WANE-TV Fort Wayne 

KPRC-TV Houston 

WHTN-TV . . . Huntington-Charleston 

KARK-TV little Roeic 

KCOP Los Angeles 

WPST-TV Miami 

WISN-TV Milwaukee 



KSTP-TV .... Minneapolis-St. Paul 

WSM-TV Nashville 

WTAR-TV Norfolk 

KWTV Okla. City 

KMTV Omaha 

WTVH Peoria 

WJAR-TV Providence 

WTVD Raleigh-Durham 

KCRA-TV Sacramento 

WOAI-TV San Antonio 

KFMB-TV San Diego 

KTBS-TV Shreveport 

WNDU-TV .... South Bend-Elkhart 

KREM-TV Spokane 

KOTV Tulsa 

KARD-TV Wichita 



Television Division 



Edward Petry& Co. Jnc. 

The Original Station Representative 

New York • Chicago • Atlanta • Boston • Dallas • Detroit • Los Angeles • San Francisco • St. Louis 



CHRYSLER'S 
NEW AIR MEDIA 
CAMPAIGNS 

Sharply revising previ- 
ous patterns, nation's 
No. 3 auto company is 
introducing new mod- 
els, with strong spot 
radio for all divisions, 
plus big tv special 

Page 27 



Special report on 
rating services: 
The Pulse Inc. 

Page 30 

New products 
changing old 
ad tactics 

l^age 34 

MARKETING 
Set-up grows 

Page 38 



DIGKST ON f*AGi^ 



WHEELING: 37" TV MARKET 

*Television Magazine 8/1/57 

One Station Reaching The Booming Upper Ohio Valley 



NO. 8 IN A SERIES: 

NATURAL GAS 




An outstanding contributor to the prosper- 
ous progress and the far-reaching future of 
the WTRF-TV area is the Manufacturers 
Light & Heat Company of the Columbia 
Gas System. Since 1945 Manufacturers has 
expended more than $165 milhon to improve 
its distribution of vital natural gas to the 
industrial giants which make the WTRF-TV 
area the Ruhr of America . . . gas, too, for 
heating, cooking and cooling to the 425,196 
TV homes which comprise the WTRF-TV 
market, where 2 million people spend $2K 
billion annually. Manufacturers $6 million 
annual payroll (estimated for the WTRF-TV 
area) helps make this a super market for 
alert advertisers. 



Typical of Manufacturers prog- 
ress is this new $4 million com- 
pressor station at the Majorsville, 
W.Va., storage field, a vital 
link in Manufactui 
gas distribution system. More 
than 30 billion cubic feet of gas 
are in underground storage at 
Majorsville. 



WHEELING 7, WEST VIRGINIA 



Hvtrf'tv 



eachinq a market that's reaching new importance! Ci^g^ 



mt toufita! 

inMIMTV 



Strategically located to exclusively serve 
LANSING.... FLINT.... JACKSON 



C..^^^^..ABC 




Represented by the P.G.W. Colonel 



I 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Editor and Publishor 



20 September 19Sa • lol. 12, ^o. 38 

DNSC 

THE WEEKLY MAOAZiNC TV/RADIO ADVCRTISERS USK 



S«cretary-Treasur«r 



Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENl 

Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 
Managing Editor 
Alvin W. Outcalt 
News Editor 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Chrysler Corporation's startling new air strategy 

27 N^illi sales ilown and budgets cut, Chrysler is planning a surprise for 
the automobile industry- with a strategic move in radio and television 

Shirtsleeves and slip-stick 

30 A pr..fil.' of The Pulse Inc. and man who made it— Dr. Sydney Roslow. 
First in a series of articles exploring the work-load behind the rating 

Tv spots in kids' shows prove No. 1 apple seller 

32 Washington State Apple Commission found spot tv so successful last 
year, it's putting a majority of its budget there this coming season 

New product cascade jolts ad tactics 

34 '^'■**' products — foods, soaps, tobaccos, drugs, toiletries — now have two- 
thirds share of market. As a result, many ad patterns are obsolete 

Kroger tests new spot radio pattern 

36 'n an unsual marketinginedia approach, this chain pushed seven 
piivule label items, 10 national brands using saturation spot radio 

Tv revenues in multi-station markets 

37 SPONSOR lists 1957 income figures, released by FCC for the 70 U. S. 
markets which last year had three or more tv stations in operation 

Marketing in the modern agency 

38 A behind-lhe-scene look at BBDO's marketing department points up the 
increased focus of attention on the role of marketing in advertising 

Short wave: quick route to sales in Latin America 

40 American Express is one of many advertisers using short wave radio 
to reach Central and South American markets. Here's what they buy 



SPONSOR ASKS:: Has the local television station be- 
come merely a film medium? 

42 As syndicated and feature film sales soar in most markets, three sta- 
tion men discuss the effects of film programing on the tv industry 



Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editor 

W. F. Milcsch 

Associate Editor 

Russ Carpenter 

IMidwest Editor (Chicago) 

Western Editor (Les. Angela 

Pete Rankin 
Film Editor 
Beth Drexler Brod 
Assistant Editors 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Fiorowltz 
Contributing Editor 
Joe Csida 
Art Editor 
Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 
Florence B. Hamsfi«r 
Editorial Assistant 



Vlkki 



Iskki 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Advertising Promotion Manage 

Jane Pinkerton 



VP-Westei 



Managei 



Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 
Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sdndra Lee Oncay. Asst. 

Administrative Staff 

Dorris Bowers 

Georqe Becker 

Jessie Ritter 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 

Emily CtNIo 

Harry B. Fleischman 

Accounting Department 



FEATURES 

53 FilniS.opc 

22 J9th and Madison 

54 Marketing Week 

58 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

41 Radio Basics 

58 Picture Wrap-Lp 

48 Hadio Results 

56 >ponsor Hears 



IHSEl 



10 >|)onsor Backstage 

17 Sponsor-Scope 

72 Sponsor Speaks 

4G Spot Buys 

72 Ten-Second Spots 

S Timebuyers at Work 

70 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

55 Washington Week 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49Hi St. 
(49th & Madison) Nlw York 17, N. Y. TeU- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Offico: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. 
mingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 



Hollywood 4-8089. 
Baltimore 11, 
Canada and 



Sunset Bouleva 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. %3 a y 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Krinted in u.i.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered at 
2nd class matter on 29 January 1948 at the Balti- 
more postoffice u ■ ■' ' ■ ' ' •■ 
£)1958Spon 




This month wnep-tv becomes one of 
America's most powerful television 
stations . . . zooming up tower height and 
visual power to deliver a bonus of about 
80,000 additional tv homes ... penetrat- 
ing even fringe areas with maximum signal intensity on 
direct hne-of-sight. 

WNEP-TV will now deliver the best possible coverage of 
the prosperous Scranton — Wilkes-Barre trading area at 
the lowest cost-per-thousand. 



In North Eastern Pennsylvania's 21- 
county area, wnep-tv will now be hit- 
ting a total of 336,157 tv homes (plus 
about 65,000 more reached by two satel- 
htes) ...blanketing a booming industrial 
center with annual retail sales of over $2 billion. 
Add ABC-TV 's top-rated shows . . . fine new local program- 
ming from studios in both Scranton and Wilkes-Barre... 
and WNEP-TV makes the "prettiest picture" for advertiser 
and viewer alike! 



REPRESENTED BY AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



WNEP-TV 

Channel 16 • Scranton— Wilkes-Barre 



A TRANSCONTINENT STATION 

WROC-TV, Rochester, N. Y. . WSVA Radio, WSVA-TV, Harrisonburg 
WGR Radio, WGR-TV, Buffalo . WNEP-TV, Scranton— Wilkes-Barre 

OPnCES: 70 NIAGARA ST., BUFFALO, MOHAWK 230O • 15 E. 47th ST., NEW YORK, PLAZA 1-3030 



pnTSymt 

liirservi 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^^tB 



(^ (TM-^ 



t 








i.iRH«ii if 



(llllli;^ 



DIRECT HIT! 



UllvXIiVyl r±i± ; Smack on target fromfh^ 
mark again and again with astute advertising agencies. Among those who t 
are J. Walter Thompson, BBDO, Young & Rubicam and Campbell-Mitl 







k 



fjofiitant of release, FLIGHT is hitting the 
^ho eady ordered FLIGHT for their clients 
iKJey know an aerodynamic when they see it. 



NBC TELEVISION FILMS A DIVISION OF 



CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 




JlERCnANDISIXG AWARD 

Thanks. Ed. f 

k&E and CBS ^ 

We ^vear our medals proudly 
iu KEL-0-LAND, America's 
most award-winning market. 
And we give the advertiser a 
broad front to pin them on. For 
KEL-0-LAND comprises 73,- 
496 square miles of viewers in 
four states.* Joe Floyd's 
unique tv, booster hookup en- 
ables you to buy this huge sec- 
tion of America from one 
single-station rate card, at low- 
est -cost -per -thousand offered 
anywhere. 

*South Dakota, Minnesota, 
Iowa, Nebraska 
(See X.C.S. #3 Composite. 
KKLOKDLO KPLO, Report.) 

CBS • ATU' • XBC 

KEL-0-LAND 

KELO-TV 

Sioux Falls: "»<' boo.^tn-s 

KDLO-TV 
KPLO-TV 

Pierre- Valentine-Chamberlain 
General Offices: Sioux Falls, S.I). 
JOE FLOYD, President 

Evans Nord, Gen. Mgr., Larry Bentson, V.P. 

REPRESENTED BY H-R 

In Minneapolisi: Wayne Evans & Assoc. 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Last iveek, officers and technicians of the U. S. Third Army, 
paid a special visit to Charlotte, M. C, to talk with an 
energetic Arkansas-born Carolinian, whom columnist John 
Crosby once called ^^one of the most sincere salesmen in 
radio.''"' The reason: The Army wanted a closer look at the 
operations and equipment of an outstanding tv station which 
has just added another to its long line of distinguished firsts. 



The ne^^smaker: Charles H. Crutchfield, executive v.p. 
and general manager of the Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Co., 
whose blue ribbon outlet, WBTV, broadcast on 5 September the first 
color videotape show ever originated by a local station. 

Equipped with the seventh color video tape recorder built by 
RCA (the first six were shipped to NBC TV recording centers), 
WBTV taped its Betty Freezor Show at 11 a.m., played it back 
at 1 p.m. with perfect sound and picture quality. The $100,000- 
plus installation, which records both color and black and white, net- 
work and local, makes WBTV the 
first tv station in the country to be 
equipped with all known means of 
color programing. 

For Crutchfield, and for Jeffer- 
son Standard, which also operates 
WBT, Charlotte, and WBTW, Flor- 
ence, S. C, both the "firsts" and 
the recognition were an old fa- 
miliar story. 

WBT, third commercially li- 
censed radio station in the U. S. 
and the first in the South, has won 
numerous awards for showman- 
ship, promotion, public service and news. 
the Carolinas, it broadcast the first color 
had the first tv studios in the nation designed for color telecasting. 

Creative force behind these accomplishments is Crutchfield himself. 
Joining WBT as an announcer in 1933. he became program manager 
in 193.5, and in 1945 at the age of 33, general manager — the youngest 
general manager ever appointed to a network-owned outlet (CBS). 

By 1951, a well known figure in the broadcast industry, he was 
selected by the U. S. State Department from a group of 18 of the 
nation's top radio experts, to act as advisor in setting up a radio 
network in Communist-threatened Greece. 

Five years later he was touring Russia with 47 other high-ranking 
AmeHcan businessmen for a special survey of Soviet economic con- 
ditions. His verdict on Russian tv: incredibly backward. 

A color tv fan, Crutchfield is pushing for more color programs and 
greater color set coverage (at present there are 3,000 sets in the 
Charlotte area). He hopes eventually to present 100% color sched- 
ules, predicts "it could happen in as little as two or three years." ^ 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Charh 



■hfield 



The first tv station in 
in the Southeast (1953), 





'^^^ 



W M 






I 



fe^A«e 






''Oris I 






'^■c.^, 

'^^&i^l 



**"».5fi 




SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



WHAT 
IS A 
TIMEBUYER? 

A timebuyer is an indoor 

sportsman with a keen sense 

of humor, who keeps on target 

by pinpointing his markets with 

well-directed, incisive thrusts. 

>A/HAT DOES HE DO? 

He buys 

WGBI 

radio 
scranton— Wilkes barre 

because the 

station has consistently increased 

its dominance over its 

combined market since 1925. 

In the latest Scranton- 

Wilkes Barre Pulse, 

WGBI has 45 per cent more 

listeners than "Station B," 

and 325 weekly quarter-hour 

wins — 305 more than 

its closest competitor. 

CBS Affiliate 

4/10^ Represented by H-R 




<« 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Sam Vitt, Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, New York, media 
supervisor on Bristol-Myers products and Noxzema, makes some 
-uuucstions for buying tv schedules for this coming season. "One," 
Sam says, "don't have set ideas about frequency. What applied last 
year doesn't necessarily apply this year. There are too many varia- 
bles that upset any formula ap- 
proach. Then, too, new discount 
packages may enable you to con- 
siderably increase your frequency 
and effectiveness. Two, study the 
shows and personalities on each 
station carefully. They are con- 
stantly changing, and unawareness 
of these changes can result in bad 
buys. Three, watch for inflated 
ratings. Secure from the station 
a list of its feature film titles and 
the play-dates, then check the 

schedules of the important features against the ratings and you'll get 
a pretty good idea of how accurate and representative the ratings 
are. Four, be careful not to spread your budget too much. If the 
client's budget is limited, it is better to buy on a market-by-market 
basis, concentrating on each area, rather than to hit the entire coun- 
tr\ or marketing area at one time with a low-pressure campaign." 



Marie Coleman, Donahue & Coe. Inc., New York, timebuyer for 
MGM and Carolina Rice, feels that radio's audience will grow even 
bigger in the next few years because of the steady sale of radios. 
■'Nevertheless.' Marie says, "the stations must provide more and 
better data if thev want their billings to keep pace with circulation. 
I think advertisers and agencies 
would like to see, in particular, 
^^^^^^ more success stories from stations 

^flHHj^^ on national advertisers. The trade 

^^m ^^m press, especially sponsor, reports 

^Hp»" » jB in careful detail the successful 

^fc ^,-- A campaigns of national advertisers, 

^^^■■j^^^^^ and these are very helpful, but still 

^^^^^HP^^^^^^^ more are needed. I am fully aware, 

^^^^^K^. J^^^^B of course, of the difficulty in secur- 

H^^^^BK^^^^^I case histories from advertisers. 

Advertisers, for good reason, are 
often reluctant to provide such in- 
ill help their competitors. But secrecy 
ridiculous extreme that information 
that is common trade knowledge is guarded like a secret rocket 
formula. Let us hope more advertisers will realize the long-range 
value of case histories so there will be a freer flow of information." 



formation because the\ fear it 
is sometimes carried to such 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^-MJi 




^■■■•■■^^^^^^BUT...With WKZO-TV 



AMERICAN RESEARCH BUREAU 

MARCH 1958 REPORT 
GRAND R&PIDS-KALAMAZOO 



TIME PERIODS 



MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

7 30 a m. fo 5 00 p m 
5 00 p m to midnight 

SATURDAY 

8 30 a m. to midnight 
SUNDAY 

9:00 a.m. to midnight 
TOTALS 



NOTE The surv 
Grand Rapids and 
ARB's opinion t' 




Kent County, and 6 



You Always Get Aces 

In Kalamazoo -Grand Rapids! 

It takes accuracy, plus a lot of luck, to score an ace in 
golf — but for a real winner in market coverage 
you need only WKZO-TV in Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids! 
The latest "scorecard" from ARB shows why — see left! 
WKZO-TV telecasts from Channel 3 with 100,000 watts 
from a 1000' tower. It is the Official Basic CBS Television 
Outlet for Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids — serves over 
600,000 television homes in one of America's top-20 TV 
markets! 

*Chances of scoring an ace are 8,606-to-l {Based on 20 years 
of play in New York World Telegram & Sun tournament). 




y^KZO-TV 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • 1000' TOWER 

Studios in Both Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids 

For Greater Western Michigan 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



by Joe Csida 




the Metro Area 

IN THE TOP 50 OF ALL 
262 METRO AREAS IN 
PERCENTAGE OF 
GROWTH IN 

• POPULATION 

• E.B.I. 

• RETAIL SALES 



the TV Market 



47 COUNTY 


NIELSEN 




COVERAGE 


AREA 


POPULATION 




1,095,200 


FAMI 


lES 




268,300 


TOTA 


L RETAI 


L SALES 


736,664,000 


FOOD 


STORE 


SALES 


201,960,000 


CEN. 


MERCHA 


NDISE SALES 86,418,000 


APPAREL STORES SALES 43,313,000 


FURN 


& HOUSE APPLIANCES 








40,228,000 


AUTOMOTIVE 


DEALER 


STORE 








155,451,000 


CAS SERVICE 


STATION 


72,523,000 


DRUG 


STORE 


SALES 


24,150,000 


EATING & DRINKING 


29,170,000 


BLDC 


MTS. C 


HDWE. 


48,755,000 


TOTA 


L NET E.B.I. 


1,256,409,000 






Source: 




Cover 


gc from 


NCS #3—1958 


Markc 


t Data 


from Sales Management 


Survey 


of Buyi 


ng Power- 


-May 10, 1958. 






the 


Station 




[ COLUMBUS^EORGIA | 

CALL HOLLINCBERY CO. 




^ Sponsor 
backstage 



Tv's fall forecast 

In the fall season I think you may see: 
... An even more widespread and imaginative 
use of videotape than was indicated in sponsor's 
recent VTR report. Ampex's semi-automatic 
splicer will be largely responsible for this. Up 
till now all splicing on vtr had to be done man- 
ually and required a degree of skill not generally 
possessed, even by many of the best engineers. 
New splicer should result in even greater use of videotape in film 
syndication than has been the case up to the present. Like every- 
thing the careful Ampex folks make, production on the splicer is a 
little on the slow side. But it should reach a level of about 40 or 50 
a month very shortly according to Ampex brass. Splicer will enable 
few firms producing commercials for agencies and advertisers to 
work more proficiently and effectively for their clients, too. RCA's 
color vtr, incidentally, got its very first station usage, just a week or 
so ago, when WBTV in Charlotte, N. C, tape recorded its Betty 
Freezor Show in color. The half -hour stanza was taped between 11 
and 11:30 a.m. on Friday, 5 September, and played back on the air 
between 1 and 1:30 p.m. Station brass tells us picture and sound 
quality were absolutely perfect. . . . 

More spectacular spectaculars 

... At least one, and possibly several more, efforts are underway 
to produce major spectaculars on which television alone won't have 
to pick up the entire tab. The big one, presently to be live, and 
scheduled for video presentation via NBC TV on Easter Sunday, 
29 March, is the Mary Martin Show. Mary, as you may know, left 
Saturday, 6 September, via Mitchell Field, Long Island, for Alaska. 
She is doing a complete show of the highlights from some of her past 
successes, including Peter Pan, first for the Armed Forces, then for 
civilians, live across the United States in some 60 cities. 

Mary's tour is under the aegis of the Department of Defense and 
the USO in coordination with NBC. In Alaska the company will 
make the Elmendorf Air Force Base, the Ladd Air Force Base, the 
Eielson Air Force Base, Fort Richardson, Fort Greeley, the outpost 
of Kotzebue, just outside Nome, King Salmon village and the Kodiak 
Naval Station. They will also play a couple of benefits including one 
for the Crippled Children's Association in Anchorage. The Alaskan 
phase of the tour will run about two weeks. 

Members of the troupe will include Mary's husband and producer, 
Richard Halliday; the Chief of the Armed Forces Professional En- 
tertainment Branch, Lt. Colonel Lionel Layden; Luis Bonfa, an out- 
standing guitar player from Brazil; Dirk Sanders, a dancer. Musical 
conductor for the show will be John Lesko, while Ernest Flatt will 
handle the choreography, and Peter Lawrence will be stage man- 
ager. Also with the troupe, and representing NBC, will be the grand 
old man of show business, John Royal. John was with our radio 
group when we made Europe in 194.5, and he'll probably be with the 
first troupe that makes the Interplanetary Circuit. And talking about 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Get Adam Young to tell you 

what's available — or talk to 

KOWH General Manager 

Virgil Sharpe. 



Omaha 



REPRESENTED BY ADAM YOUNC INC. 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




"Sentiment's got no place in figuring the 
RIGHT time-buy, buddy. When it comes to 
getting the most for a client's dollar, give me 
facts — the straight, most recent facts, I mean. 
"Like the way I figure KFWB in the Los 
Angeles market is what I'm talking about. 
Color Radio on KFWB's Channel 98 is the 
kind of new, exciting radio that has pulled 
listeners right in close. 

"Cold hard facts tell the story: as of July, 
Hooper shows KFWB as the NUMBER ONE 
station in the market . . . with a solid 95.5% 
gain in share-of-audience. Nielsen is UP 
82.7% ... and Pulse is UP 37.1% ... all since 
January. 

"So, buddy, here's one time-buyer who's quit 
buying stations strictly by ear ... or by 'tradi- 
tion'. The smart time-buyer will always buy 
KFWB . . . first in Los Angeles. It's the thing 
to do!" 



Call or write for your copy of 
this fact-filled brochure: "TIME- 
, BUYING FOR FUN AND PRO- 
FIT". Loaded with lots of handy 

ools which make it easy to buy 

,'olor Radio. 




CrU3wxn£^ 




1 ^*^o»u^ 



^t^ 



m^ 



6419 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD. HOLLYWOOD 28 HOLLYWOOD 3 5151 



ROBERT M. PURCELl, Pres. and Gen. Mgr. • MILTON H. KLEIN, Sales Mgr. 
Represented nationally by JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



Sponsor backstage 



old friends, let me parenthetically wish the best of luck to Ed Kirby, 
our escorting oflicer on that same V.I.P. trip to Europe in '45. Ed's 
just been made public relations director for the USO. 

But back to Miss Martin's tour — after she completes the Armed 
Forces phase of the tour, as I've indicated, she will take the show to 
60 cities in the United States. By 29 March, it will no doubt come 
off on the NBC telelanes as one of the finest spectaculars ever pro- 
duced. And Miss Martin will have done herself incalculable pr good; 
made the substantial quantities of loot to which she has grown ac- 
customed; and all without the network, sponsor or agency being hit 
with an exhorbitant tab for a star and show of this magnitude. 

Another indication of this continuing — sometimes successful, some- 
times not so successful — effort to get maximum mileage out of costly 
show business and television properties is CBS TV's plan to offer to 
stations, free of charge and purely as a public service some of the 
great shows on some of the fine public affairs series. Meaningful 
episodes from such significant skeins as face the Nation and See It 
Now will shortly be offered bv the web's film sales division. . . . 

Showmanship and statesmanship 

... In the fall season I think you may also see: 

. . . The most solid of the quiz shows stage a remarkable resur- 
gence, and regain their positions as top buys for some shrewd ad- 
vertisers in spite of the continuing newspaper campaign to knock 
them out of the tv picture entirely. . . . 

. . . An increasing use of show business and shows, off-television 
as well as on, by major advertisers. The recent Oldsmobile presenta- 
tion of a refurbished "Good News" at the Broadway Theatre in New 
York was an excellent example of priming dealers and sales force 
through effective showmanship. Starring the Olds team of Bill Hayes 
and Florence Henderson, the DeSylva, Brown & Henderson musical 
(oniedy of the '30's came off as excellent entertainment and potent 
internal salesmanship. 

Olds did a smart thing in using real pros, not only in the starring 
roles, but in every other department as well. Carol Haney, of "Pa- 
jama Game" fame, for example, did the show's choreography. And 
in the middle of August, this same General Motors staged one of the 
biggest spectaculars in the streets of Flint, Michigan, that any city 
has ever seen. 

I've done a number of pieces on the desirability of the major 
agencies organizing show business departments, just as they organ- 
ized, and developed to a high degree of efficiency their radio/tv 
departments. I still believe it will happen one of these days. 

. . . And in the fall season you'll see more and more statesmanship 
on the part of television network brass. NBC Board Chairman Bob 
Sarnoff recently got off a widely heralded stroke of statesmanship, 
when he proposed that the tv webs pool their resources and facilities 
in covering events of national and international significance, spe- 
cifically the 1960 political conventions. Bob will get off a few more 
in the months to come, and Frank Stanton, a tv leader who has long 
evidenced a flair for statesmanship as well as showmanship will toss 
in a few sound ideas of his own. 

. . . And in this fall season, you'll see very little new in the way 
of network television programing. The tried and true formats, both 
on commercial and public service levels will continue. And as far as 
I. as out" observer am concerned, that's not too bad. ^ 



20 SEPTEMBKR 1958 




(Aesop updated) 
A dispute arose between the Wind and the Sun as to which 
was the stronger. They agreed to try their strength upon a 
traveler to see which could take his cloak off first. The Wind 
blew a cold, fierce blast; but the stronger he blew the closer 
the traveler wrapped his cloak about him and the tighter he 
grasped it. Then the Sun broke out with welcome beams and 
dispersed the vapor and cold. The traveler was soon overcome 
with the heat and cast his cloak upon the ground. 

So it goes with some radio stations. They think a show of 
force gains more listeners than friendly persuasion. 

Moral: pick a 

Radio Balfimore Radio Boston 

Radio CIticago Radio Mempltis 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



b 



MR. WEATHERWATCHER. 



. . . who plays the law of averages — average temperatures that is — because 
his sales peaks are set by the weather. He holds his fire until the weather is 
right, then he lets go with both barrels — sight and sound! 

Market-by-market his Spot Television advertising moves in when the selling is 
good . . . moves in with great power — and no waste. 

To help you plan your strategy we've prepared a booklet we call "SPOT TELE- 
VISION COST YARDSTICKS" which shows average temperatures month-by-month, 
and Spot Television costs regionally, seasonally and market-by-market. We'd 
like to send it to you. 

Just write to Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Spot Television, 250 Park Avenue, N. Y. C. 



/% 



ff 



B 


WEST 




KBOI-TV 


Boise 


8 


KBTV 


Denver 


KGMB-TV 


Honolulu 


fe 


KMAU KHBC-TV Hawaii 


«.' 


KTLA 


Los Angeles 


ti 


KRON-TV 


San Francisco 


^ 


KIRO-TV 


Seattle-Tacoma 


i 










MIDWEST 






EAST 


£. 






s 




WHO-TV Des Moines 


13 


NBC 


WBZ-TV 


Boston 


4 NBC 






WOC-TV Davenport 


6 


NBC 


WGR-TV 


Buffalo 


2 NBC 




u 




WDSM-TV Duluth-Superior 


6 


NBC-ABC 


KYW-TV 


Cleveland 


3 NBC 




2 CBS 


WDAY-TV Fargo 


6 


NBC-ABC 


WWJ-TV 


Detroit 


4 NBC 




1 


9 ABC 


KMBC-TV Kansas City 


9 


ABC 


WJIM-TV 


Lansing 


6 CBS 




9 CBS 


WISC-TV Madison, Wis. 


3 


CBS 


WPIX 


New York 


11 IND 




n 


WCCO-TV Minneapolis-St. Paul 


4 


CBS 


KDKA-TV 


Pittsburgh 


2 CBS 




5 IND 


WMBD-TV Peoria 


31 


CBS 


WROC-TV 


Rochester 


5 NBC 




fi 


4 NBC 
7 CBS 


SOUTHWEST 






SOUTHEAST 










6 


CBS 


WCSC-TV 


Charleston, S 


. C. 5 


CBS 






KRIS-TV Corpus Christ! 


6 


NBC 


WIS-TV 


Columbia, S 


C. 10 


NBC 






WBAP-TV Fort Worth-Dallas 


5 


NBC 


WSVA-TV 


Harrisonburg 


Va. 3 


ALL 






KENS-TV San Antonio 


5 


CBS 


WFGA-TV 

WTVJ 

WDBJ-TV 


Jacksonville 

Miami 

Roanoke 


12 
4 

7 


NBC 
CBS 
CBS 


f 



Peters, Griffin 

Spot Televis 



Pioneer Station Representatives Since 7 932 



, INC. 



SAN FRANCISCO 






^#' 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Bartell Family Radio is 
an exciting package, en- 
thusiastically accepted by 
the American consumer 
market. The product has 
wide appeal, containing a 
tempting basic ingredient: 
Family Fun. This consists 
in part of copyright featur- 
ettes, companionable music, 
imaginative news reporting 
— all presented w^ith w^arm, 
friendly professionalism. 
No "formula radio" here! — 
but programing continu- 
ously researched toward 
maximum response, best 
results. 

Each advertising message 
carries the prestige of more 
than a decade of radio 
leadership; reaches more 
buyers at lo\ver cost. 




BARTELL IT . . . and SELL IT! 




AMERICA'S FIRST RADIO FAMILY SERVING 15 MILLION BUYERS 

Sold Nationally by ADAM YOUNG INC. 



• 20 SKI'TEMBICR 1958 




Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 

Copyright 1958 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



National spot billings for October and November should be as good at the sta- 
tion level as they were in the 1957 months. 

What makes the billings outlook for September somewhat less spectacular is the fact that 
the majority of fall contracts had late starting dates. 

The obvious reason : Advertisers delayed longer than usual in making their tv net- 
work commitments. 



Ford and Chrysler have encountered scarcely any objections to a hedge they've 
inserted into their latest spot contracts, namely: 

Each is asking for immediate relief in the event of a strike. 

J. Walter Thompson, for Ford, explains that its lawyers had insisted that no or- 
ders be issued without a production-interruption clause. 



The big national spot radio newcomer of the week was Rival Dog Food (GB&B) 

with a 16-week campaign in a long list of markets. 

Other imminent starters: S&H Green Stamps (SSCB), four weeks of 20-40 spots a 
week; Pertussin (McCann-Erickson), eight weeks of minute announcements, beginning 20 
October; Pall Mall (SSCB), supplementary station list, effective 13 October. 

Incidentally, Time magazine (Joe GanS agency) is testing a spot radio campaign 
in Sacramento, Columbus, 0., and Springfield, Mass., 13-15 October, using 50-60 spots for 
the three days. 

The flow of new national spot tv business reached almost deluge proportions 
the past week, giving the reps more pressure than they've had in a long row of months. 

Included in the New York swim were Wildroot (BBDO) ; Lever's Handy Andy 
(K&E) ; Vaseline Hair Tonic (McCann-Erickson), 109 markets; Gallo Wine and Philip 
Morris (Doyle-Dane-Bernbach) ; Texaco and Folger's coffee (Cunningham & Walsh) ; and 
P&G's Crisco (Compton). 

Among the new tv spot buys out of Chicago and Minneapolis: Tea Council 
(Burnett). 20 weeks in 20 top markets starting 19 October; Gillette's Thorexin (North); 
Helene Curtis' Suave (Gordon Best), top 40 markets; General Mills' Protein-Plus (Knox- 
Reeves) ; Trylon Products' Bathe & Glo (Do" Kemper) ; Lanolin Plus (EWRR). 

(For more details on some of these placements see AGENCIES— NEWS WRAP-UP, 
page 62.) 

With 14 evening half-hours still open on the tv networks, don't be surprised if they 
start flirting more ardently with regional advertisers. 

In eyeing this potential, the networks are fully aware of the problems facing them from 
two angles: (1) getting regionals whose distribution doesn't overlap on a hookup, and 
(2) appeasing affiliates who might be excluded or who feel that the regional advertiser be- 
longs to spot. 

The one area where the networks have met with no affiliate opposition on this score 
is sports. 

ABC TV has been making mighty strides in delivering live clearances. 

By mid-October it will be in a position to offer a live coverage factor of 86.5% for all 
U.S. homes at night. 

Daytime live coverage will come to 84%. 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



T 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



Traveling agency media executives lately have run into a type of quizzing from 
major station managers that betrays their passionate desire to trim costs. 

The nature of the question posed: Would it be practical for a top-notch station to 
deal directly with agencies, thus dispensing with tlie services of a rep? 

Mediamen have told SPONSOR-SCOPE that their answers invariably have been 
negative. 

This is the agency viewpoint: The mechanics of agency operation make it imperative 
that the buyer get quick, convenient service; an agency that deals heavily in spot can't afford 
the time, facilities, and expense to carry on directly with individual stations. 

When one media executive observed that he was curious what was behind the question, 
he got this reply from station people: "We've been taking inventory of ways and means of 
matching our percentage of profit to our rising gross but without doing damage to 
that gross." 

(See 13 September SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 9, for report on move initiated by the SRA 
to formulate the rep's role in air media via a code of fair trades practices.) 



Following CBS TV by several months, NBC TV has taken contractual action to stop 
triplespotting trouble. 

In response to continuing pressure from agencies, NBC TV submitted to affiliates an 
amendment to their agreement whose intent is to eliminate the opportunity for triplespot- 
ting in chainbreaks. 

The amendment commits the station not to delete any production credits at the end 
of the program or eliminate the network identification or promo. 

Affiliates also are required to certify regularly that no material has been clipped, or 
conversely to "identify the exact timings of anything clipped." 



For an agency that not so long ago almost wasn't on speaking terms with the medium, 
McCann-Erickson has started to show a marked interest in radio. 

The agency now has about $50,000 a week riding in network radio for Lehn & Fink, 
Lewis Howe, and Buick plus even more than that in spot radio. 

Of course, the radio stake looks paltry compared to the estimated $1.5 million McCann- 
Erickson pours into all-tv weekly; but for radio it's at least a beginning. 



The business of bartered time seems to have drifted into a quiet groove. 

Merchants of this commodity are boasting that the explosive or spectacular barter 
operators have departed for other fields and that the business is now content to deal only 
in marginal time. 

One of the barter firms has branched out as a timebuying "consultant." Its function: 

After ascertaining a small advertiser's needs, it evaluates time that can be bartered 
and contracts for it. 

Basically what hampers the barterer is coming up with a cost-per-thousand 
that outmatches the average rating-point buy. 

NBC Spot Sales this week extended its probe of the timebuying fraternity 

to opinions about station executives and under what circumstances they like to see them. 
The areas the latest Spot Sales questionnaire covers include: 

• Are visits from station people helpful? What should they bring along by way of 
information? 

• Have such visits influence, directly or indirectly, on a schedule purchase? 

• Does the timebuyer object to the station man going direct to the account execu- 
tive or the client without prior knowledge? 

• What months are most convenient for seeing station visitors and when can such 
visits influence buying decisions most? 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



The ever increasing intricacy of agency operation is vividly evident in the wheels 
within wheels involved in the initiating, buying, and following-through of a spot tv 
campaign. 

Here's a list of the specialists within a product group that are essential to the spot 
machinery at Y&R; sometime during the course of the campaign all of these actually will 
come in contact with the client: 



1. Account supervisor 

2. Account executive 

3. Assistant account executive 

4. Media supervisor 

5. All-media buyer 

6. Assistant media buyer 

7. Tv-radio program supervisor 

8. Tv-radio account man 



9. Marketing or merchandising 

10. Copy supervisor 

11. Art man 

12. Research contact 

13. Commercial producer 

14. Tv-radio traffic supervisor 

15. Commercial traffic man 



This team sets up the ground rules before the campaign hits the tv stations. The 
share the responsibility not only in the strategy but in choosing the schedule. 



Life gets more and more complex for the station rep, particularly the traveling 
from contact to contact. 

Listening to reps, SPONSOR-SCOPE this week noted this continuing trend: 
Not only do rep salesmen go through a hectic chain of command at the agency it- 
self (see item above), but they are asked to visit the client involved — usually the ad man- 
ager and the sales manager — and then go back to the agency with a report on the client's 
reaction. 

NBC TV has just compiled a set of statistics — based on January-June compari- 
sons — which show that the bloom still is on the tv rose. 

Among the upward trends indicated by these facts and figures: 

1) The lime spent watching was 5.37 hours per day per home this year, as com- 
pared to 5.33 hours in 1957. This adds up to 229,122,000 home hours per day vs. 211.244,- 
000 last year. 

2) Nighttime sets in use for the first half of this year averaged 59.9%, com- 
pared to 58.4% the year before. In terms of average total homes, the jump was from 23,146,- 
000 to 25,558,000. 

3) Total rating points for the three networks in the evening went from 62.4 to 
63.3, an increase of 1%. (Notes NBC TV: "this is particularly significant since syndica- 
tion has contributed a good deal of quality and flexibility in local programing 
schedules.") 



The critics notwithstanding, network tv viewers keep drifting away from the 60- 
minute drama and giving more of their attention to westerns. 

An NBC TV analysis, out this week, shows that: 

• Between 1956 and 1958 (using the January-June period as base) the average audi- 
ence for westerns went up 33%, while the hour drama took a 9% drop. 

• Westerns are topping hour dramas by 48% in their average minute audience, where- 
as in 1956 it was a virtual standoff. 

The following table documents this thesis: 



Avg. Eve. Show 

Hour Drama 

Western* 

*No. denotes half-hour 



1956 




1957 


1 


958 


AA RATING 


NO. 


AA RATING 


NO. 


AA RATING 


19.9 


127 


20.4 


129 


20.1 


20.8 


10 


19.5 


6 


18.9 


20.9 


10 


25.1 


18 


27.9 



periods. 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



T 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



Toiletries outscored foods as the No. 1 classification in network tv for July. 

It's the first time that toiletries have held that position. The gross billings for the 
month for the winner came to S8,680,100, compared to $8,363,650 for the food group. On 
the first seven months, foods still are in the lead. 

According to the same source (TvB), Winston in July replaced Tide as the biggest 
monthly brand spender. Winston's outlay was S834.485 for July, with Anacin and Chev- 
rolet coming next in order. Tide wound up No. 4. 

Alcoa (F&S&R) will spend around $150,000 with NBC Radio for a tie-in with 
the Boat Show in New York 16 January, combining the broadcasts of Guy Lombardo with 
a batch of five-minute segments. NBC also got an order from Pharma-Craft via JWT, 
Chicago. 

CBS Radio's new business includes Seeley Mattress (JWT), for Arthur Godfrey; 
Mennen's Skin Bracer (W&L), 10 segments; Dodge (Grant), nine segments; Lorillard 
(L&N), 12 segments a week for 13 weeks; and Chrysler, the 9:25-9:30 p.m. newscast. 

Watch for an industry-wide promotion on the part of the building industry — 
with the electric appliance manufacturers contributing — to step up consumer interest 
in lower and middle income housing. 

The slacking-off of home building for these classes has been tough on the appliance 
business, which proved so conspicuously sensitive to the recession. 

Where advertising will gain: The electrical field's role will include either self- 
supporting or tie-in campaigns in the various media. 

This use of videotape doesn't mean a buck to advertising, but it does demonstrate 
broadly how the device will serve to influence tv production: 

With KNXT, L.A., videotaping the Rams football game, the coach and players 
can review their first-half performance on a dressing-room screen during intermission. 

It will enable them to see their mistakes and good points and indicate where they can 
improve. 

(See special report on videotape's status in 6 and 13 September sponsor.) 

The recruting of media buyers in the major Madison Avenue agencies is now 
moving along well-defined lines. 

Those agencies who claim to have established a solid basis for upgrading from within 
their own ranks report that more and more of the buyers are coming out of merchan- 
dising and account contact. 

The advantage that the merchandising man specifically offers : His personal 
knowledge of many markets and his ability to view a client's problems in their broader 
aspects. 

A Madison Avenue agency in the $60-$70-million class this week declined to send 
a man on the road to buy time at local rates for one of its regional accounts. 

The agency advised the client that it was against the practice on principle, and that 
if the client insisted on paving the lower rate he could do his buying through his dis- 
tributors or district managers. 

Added the agenrv: If the client wanted it that way. the distributor or district manager 
could relay the bills to New York and the agency would pay them. 

This agency recently did a wholesale quiz among stations on how they determined 
their local vs. national rates: the results generally shows no hard-and-fast patterns. 

For other news coverage In this Issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 46; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 58; Washington Week, page 55; sponsor 
Hears, page 56; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 70; and Film-Scope, page 53. 

SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



IN INLANlTCAUfbRNIAiARD WESTERN nevada) 



V 



"BEELINE-^-o 







Fast, accurate news coverage is one 
reason Beeline stations deliver a large 
and responsive audience in the Billion- 
Dollar Valley of the Bees. The five 
Beeline stations have their own news 
staffs for on-the-spot local news 
stories. They work closely with Mc- 
Clatchy newspapers and tie into avail- 
able network news shows to add depth 
. to their coverage. 

As a group purchase, these radio 
stations deliver more radio homes 
than any combination of competitive 
stations ... at by far the lowest cost- 
per-thousand. (Nielsen & SR&D) 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Paul H. Raymer Co., 

National Representative 



KOH^RHNo 

KFBK O SACRAMENTO 
KBEE O MODESTO 
KMJ O FRESNO. 

^ ' \ 

KIRM^AKERSFIEUD 




20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



from CBS-TV 
Spot Sales will 
be only too happy 




i 49th and 
Madison 



:i 




Oklahoma oil 

All of us here at Needham, Louis & 
Brorby were most pleased when we 
opened this week's issue of sponsor 
to see the article on our client's recent 
special promotion in Indiana, titled 
"Oklahoma Oil Builds an Air Net- 
work.' Not only were we pleased at 
the recognition given this effort but 
at the way your Midwest Editor, put 
in perfect phraseology the entire feel 
and excitement of this campaign. 

In our opinion, you did a wonderful 
job in tracking down the story. 

Harold A. Smith 

Program Pr-wollon and 
Merchandising Manager 

Needham, Louis and 
Brorby, Inc. 

Chicago 

Buyers guide 

Has SPONSOR stopped publishing its 
annual BUYERS' GUIDE TO RADIO 
AND TV STATION PROGRAMING? 
Or have we simply misplaced both our 

1957 and 1958 issues? Or have we 
only misplaced the 1957 issue, as the 

1958 issue has not been published yet? 
Whatever has happened, we are lost 

without it. Would it be possible to 
send us two copies of the latest edi- 
tion, post haste? 

Patricia Clark 

Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

• SPONSOR hss shipped Miss Clark i«o <-.,pios 
(post haste) of our latest edition of the Buyer's 
Guide. This was puhUshrd in 1957. We plan no 
new issue in 19.$8. 

Highlights 

Thoroughly enjoyed your August 16th 
issue. 

Highlights: John E. McMillin's 
"way of a pro" comment on mashed 
murphies, and salute to the commer- 
cial chef. 

The Leo Burnett quote: "When you 
reach for the stars, you may not quite 
get one, but you won't come up with 
a handful of mud, either." 

How the cop, who provided the 
bucks for lunch and gas — on behalf 
of Messrs. Griffith and Riccobono — got 



his reward: "He's now a salesman for 
the firm, doing very well too." If that 
fact had not been revealed, I would 
have wondered about his recognition. 
It made the story complete, warmly 
reassuring. 

The WVNJ "Great Albums of 
Music'" story was also melodic reading. 
And I liked the 10-second spots 
feature about the three-way letter file 
of a St. Louis agencvman: "IN. OUT, 
and WHOOPS!" 

Plus the touch of feminine beauty 
here and there. 

Ed Boyd 
Okanagan Radio 
Kelowna, B. C. 
Canada 

Barter 

Thank you so much for supplying me 
with your tear-sheets on BARTER so 
promptly. It has enabled me to ac- 
quaint our key personnel with the 
pertinent data. 

SPONSOR Magazine has been one of 
the main sources for my knowledge of 
radio and television affairs. 

Marjorie C. Scanlan 
Kudner Agency, Inc. 
New York 

Case history 

Thank you very much for sending us 
the article on Lestoil. 

Its completeness again convinces us 
of the thoroughness with which each 
article in sponsor is handled. 

Robert C. Hall, Jr. 

Media div.. 

Car gill & Wilson, Inc. 

Richmond, Va. 

Prudential commercials 
I have a feeling that I've been remiss 
in thanking you for that great piece 
Prudential likes public service 
•ials. Herewith thanks and 
ilations on a fine joli of tight 
and editing! 

Walter Henry Nelson 
Director, pr & publicity 
Reach, McClinton & Co. 
New York 



sponsor • 20 SKPTEMBER 1958 



on why 
commei 
congrat 
writing 



FARM GALS EYE NEW PAS^UITES I 

But they've been warned,~By^irMotb§i|§,- 
to stay off Madison Avenue! 
Seriously,4hls picture is merely to show'fffdt^ 
our farm families of today, here in the land 
of Milk and Money, look and act just like 
their Cityjlousins . . . except the farmer, 
of course, has more money. 
Eye our market: 42% rural and 58% urban 
. . . more than 1,350,000 folks spending^ 
$1,750,000,000 in retail sales yearly . . ^ 
over 400,000 families enjoying Chanihe! 
2.CBS Television. 1...^ J J 

miikes a pretty picture, do 





THE LAND 
OF MILK 
ANotONEY 
WBAY ch. 2 
GREEN BAY 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




and yiforth 




First (Bnd still the best) MBvy^ln^Bctlon series, NAVY LOG 
Is noyw sweeping Into regional and local markets yiflth 
the most distinguished service record In all syndications 

Threo'year uninterrupted hitch on netwifork television; 

i Exceptional sales action for such gold^hrald sponsors as 
^ UmSm Rubber, SheaWer Pen, Maytag and American Tobacco; 

Press citations from The Billboard C'Superlor dramatic 
serles'')mMmMew York Herald Tribune C Absorbing, loaded 
with suspense, full of reallsm'')mmmand a hold-' full more; 

A Zl^gun salute from the Navy Recruiting Sm^lce which 
votes MAVY LOG Its top television source of enlistments; 

^Superlcr'^ratlng from viewers: a 25,1 total Nielsen on the 
CBS Television Network* (NAVY LOG has a ready-made 
audience of 22 million ex-servicemen and their families); 

104- headline-fresh, authentic half -hour films stowed on 
board ^provisions for two years' continuous sales duty, 

NAVY LOG commands the high sees! Signal orders to the 
nearest office of CBS TELEVISION FILM SALES, INC. 



f^l.nvly 

( If nil expression) 



S\veet Sixteen 



WorJs ty 



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Love Char-lotte as you've ne - ver loved be - 




first 


you 


start 


- ed 

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^Nation's 16th television market — Television Magazine TV set count — July, 1958 



^SPONSOR 



20 SEPTEMBEI 




^pML- 



Chrysler's startling new air strategy 



ZZ'. ^ This week, Chrysler Corporation will kick off a heavy 

j spot radio campaign that will be a surprise to the industry 

g ^ It will be followed by a net television special that may 

— ' possibly turn out to be the season's biggest television show 



^^ MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 

\^hrysler Corporation — fourth larg- 
est national advertiser and an air me- 
dia stalwart — is about to break a 
surprising new radio/tv campaign for 
its 1959 model cars. 

In exclusive interviews with SPONSOR 
at this Florida resort, Chrysler adver- 
tising executives revealed plans for the 
new campaign which departs from tra- 
ditional automobile industry advertis- 
ing practices. 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



The campaign involves these two 
highlights: 

1) In the past, each Chrysler make 
— Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto, Chrysler 
and Imperial — has conducted its own 
pre-announcement teaser campaign. 
This year, the divisions are virtually 
foregoing teaser campaigns. Instead, 
the corporation is running a massive 
teaser campaign in spot radio featur- 
ing the whole Chrysler line. 



2) Chrysler, No. 3 among network 
television spenders last year, is revising 
its net tv strategy this year. After 
dropping Climax! last June, Chrysler 
(the corporation, not its divisions) will 
probably postpone until spring buy- 
ing any regular net television show. 
Instead Chrysler will use a net tv "spe- 
cial" to introduce all five 1959 model 
cars to the public. 

What's behind this unusual air me- 
dia strategy? Interviews with Chrysler 
admen point to these four basic rea- 
sons: 

• First, limited ad budgets for the 
fourth quarter of 1958. It's no secret 
that Chrysler Corp. sales are hurting. 
Compared to 1957's first six months, 
Chrysler sales this first half plummeted 
42.2%, and its share of market dropped 
to 14.27%. Even worse, while Chrysler 



Corp. profits hit almost S90 million in 
the first half of last year, the company 
suffered a net loss of more than $25 
million in the same period this year. 
Although no one at Chrysler will 
admit it. it seems apparent that this 
financial cloud has resulted in severe 
cuts in ad budgets. Thus Chrysler's 
unusual strategy is based, in ))art. on 
the need to stretch ad dollars further 
than usual. 

• Second, the corporation had to 
develop the teaser campaign because 
most of the divisions had no teaser 
campaigns planned ; in fact, of the four 
divisions, only the Chrysler-Imperial 
division will run any teaser commer- 
cials at all. The divisions wanted to 
drop traditional teaser advertising in 
order to concentrate their budgets on 
announcement and post-announcement 
campaigns. So the corporation had to 
step in and fill the gap. 

• Third. Chrysler felt that its com- 
petitors were copying many Chrysler 
Corp. styling features, i.e., tail fins, 
and wanted to get this point across to 
the public before all the new cars were 
out. The leaser campaign will hit hard 
on {:hr\sl(M"s ?l\ling leadership. 



• Fourth, and last, there is grow- 
ing belief that the individual divisions 
should sell the product and its fea- 
tures, while the corporate budget 
should concentrate on creating a cor- 
porate image for all Chrysler cars. 
While this has been true in the past, 
she new campaign carries this strategy 
out to an even greater degree. 

The spot radio campaign will start 
1 \ September and run for three weeks. 
Both 20-second and 00-second spots 
will be used in the 50 top markets, 
with at least one station (and perhaps 
more, depending on availabilities) in 
each market. 

National spot will also be used, on 
i)oth NBC's Monitor (probably the full 
165-station lineup I and CBS' Impact 
I again, probably the full 163-station 
lineup). Only 60's will be used on 
Monitor, both 60's and 30's will be 
used on Impact. 

The spot radio campaign will have 
three phases, which will overlap and 
have similar overtones: 

• The opening phase, according to 
Chrysler's corporate advertising and 
sales promotion director Richard E. 
Forbes, will be a "thought-provoking" 




Chrysler Corp. corporate advertising and 
^ales promotion manager Richard E. Forbes 



effort aimed at potential new-car buy- 
ers and emphasizing Chrysler's styling 
leadership. 

• The second phase will start the 

"hard sell" aspect of the campaign. 

The theme: "Cars that can do what 

tiiey look like they can do — and they 

i Please turn to page 65) 



HERE ARE THE RADIO AND TELEVISION PLANS 



Plymouth Division: 

Fou Ilagopian, Plymouth 
d(\ and sales promotion 
director, reports that 
PI) mouth's advertising 
theme for its 1959 models 
\\ill be, "If it's new, Ply- 
iiKuith's got it." Plymouth 
will have no teaser cam- 
|MiiirK will use spot radio 
in i()l,,|) markets for four 
ucrk- starting 16 October, 
with mostly 60's, some 
2()'s and 30's. Plymouth 
will also use national spot on CBS' Impact seven nights a 
week (60's only I, also starting 16 October and running for 
four weeks with possibility of extension. Plymouth, which 
last year had Date ivtih the Angels (ABC IV), one quarter 
oi Climax! (CBS TV l and one half of Faurence Welk (ABC 
TV I, this fall will have full sponsorship of The Plymouth 
Shoiv starring Lawrence Welk, Wednesday nights, ABC TV, 
7:30-8:30 EST, on about 180 stations. Plymouth's agency 
is N. W. Aver. 





Dodge Division: W. I). 

"Pete" Moore, ad and 
sales promotion director, 
explains that Dodge's ad- 
vertising theme will be 
"The newest of everything 
great, the iireatest of ev- 



erything 



.ill l>r 



ad- 
jsed, 



^^^^ ^^^^^^.^J^ introductory campai: 

^^^^^k^ ^y ^^ will start 1 October with 

^^^^^^^ ^mB^^^ 3 radio campaign 

^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 20's and 60"s several times 

a day on several stations in each market, will also buy into 
NBC's Monitor sports package. Dodge is still looking into 
other possible net radio buys. Net tv buy will be Dodge 
Dancing Party, Saturday night Fawrence Welk show on 209 
ABC TV stations which will cover 200 major markets for 
Dodge. Dodge, unusual among all automotive divisions in 
industry in that more than 50(* of every ad dollar went into 
net tv in recent years, this fall will shift heavily into spot 
radio. Dodge's agency is Grant Advertising. 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



How Chrysler Corp. sales compare to net tv/ radio expenditures 





PASSENGER 
CAR SALES 


SHARE OF 
MARKET 


TOTAL AD 
BUDGET » 


NET TV 


NET RADIO » 


1950 


1.113.794 


17.60' 6 


$19,980,713^ 


$495,532 


$904,908 


1951 


1.103.330 


21.80' 


$21,072,729" 


$1,263,636 


$880,861 


1952 


884.667 


21.27% 


$20,378,198 ■! 


$1,611,362 


$945,321 


1953 


1.165.357 


20.31% 


$28,229,177'' 


$3,006,792 


$905,005 


1954 


714.347 


12.91% 


$30,829,359 " 


$8,820,955 


$1,867,212 


1955 


1.206.195, 


16.82ff 


$53,789,249 '= 


$17,272,769 


$1,300,000" 


1956 


922.043 


15.48% 


$48.140.471 » 


$18,198,264 


$750,000 " 


1957 


1.096.359 


18.33^0 


$61.429,589 '' 


$18,915,776 


$1,100,000 " 


1st half 
1958 


337.917 


14.27^0 


$13,880,975 8 


$9,577,069 


$200,000 " 



b— SPONSOR estimale. 
c — Includes net tv, net radio, magazines, 
d — Includes net tv, net radio, magazines, 
publications (est.). 



t.), net radio (est.), magazines and Sunday supplem 
B., B0.\. 0.41, and SPONSOR estimates. 



ALL FOUR CHRYSLER CORPORATIONS DIVISIONS 



DeSoto Division: J. L. 

Wichert, ad and sales pio- 
motion director, says De- 
Soto will have two ad 
themes. First will be "K\- 
ery thing you see, evei \ - 
thing you touch is new." 
Second theme will \>f 
"The smart way to iid 
places," which will In- 
backbone of year-rountl 
campaign. DeSoto will 
not use either net tv or 
net radio this fall, al- 
though looking into possible net tv shows to start next 
spring. Two major campaigns will be in spot tv and spot 
radio. Spot radio will be saturation campaign in top 10 
markets, averaging about 4 stations per market, five to 10 
«pots per week, including lO's, 20's, 30's and 60's, starting 
ivhout 16 October and running through early December. 
SiJot tv campaign will be national spot, using about 175 sta- 
tions in 60 top markets, lO's, 20's, 30's and 60's, starting 
about 16 October. DeSoto's agency is BBDO. 




Chrysler-Imperial Divi- 
sion: James C. Cowhey, 
only recently appointed 
ad and sales promotion 
director for both Chrysler 
and Imperial, says Chrys- 
ler will use as theme "The 
lion-hearted car that's ev- 
ery inch a new adven- 
ture." Imperial theme will 
be "Excellence without 
equal." Imperial will use 
no air media, Chrysler 
will be heavy in radio, 
will be only division employing teaser campaign. Three- 
week spot radio campaigns will break about 17 October, 
using 300 stations in top 100 markets, lO's, 20's, 30's and 
60's, will also use Monitor. Teaser theme will be pegged on 
"Lion-hearted Chrysler," announcement theme will stress car 
is now on display, post-announcement will urge buvers to^ 
see and drive. Cowhey is considering possibility of returning 
to tv next year, probably in network, has allowed for it in 
1959 budget. Agency for both Chrysler and Imperial is Y&R, 




SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



r;, 



dk 



r 




kilh clients: Dr. 



?(islovv (center) chats with vet 
r for BBDO, and Maxwell Ule, 



■n Frank Sihernail In shirtsleeves, with slip-stick: Roslow can 

g president at K&E be found like this often in his N.Y. office 



BEHIND THE RATINGS SYSTEMS— PART ONE 



THE PULSE — in-home interviews 



^ Since 1941, when this broadcasting service was 
founded, cHents have gone from four to more than 1,400 

^ Here is the story behind The Pulse, behind its growth 
and about the man who buiU it — Dr. Sydney Roslow 



What Pulse surveys in air media: Net- 
work radio, monthly in 26 markets; by % 
hours. Network tv, monthly in 22 markets; 
by Vi hours. Syndicated film, monthly in 22 ^ 
markets; by programs. Spot radio, from two 
to 12 times a year, depending on market; in 
200-plus markets ; by % hours. Spot tv, from 
two to 12 times a year, depending on market; 
in 157 markets. 

Out of home radio: measured along with 
and included in regular radio reports. 
Technique: All personal interviews in the 
home; auto data gathered at same time. 
Time covered: From 6 a.m. to midnight. 
Extras: Qualitative data such as audience 
composition, market or product research. 

It was a rainy night in Chicago when 
the young lady interviewer represent- 
ing The Pulse, Inc. punched the door- 
bell of a swank apartment. Almost in- 
stantly, as if she were expected or even 



long-awaited, she was admitted by a 
suave, hot-eyed gentleman decked out 
in a white tie and smoking jacket with 
satin lapels. 

"Come in, come in," he said. "You 
must be soaked, darling. Let's get 
those wet things off and irieanwhile 
I've a drink all ready and waiting for 
you." Somewhat shaken, she followed 
him into a cozy living room complete 
with couch, fireplace, and bar. It 
wasn't until he had relieved her of her 
coat and clip-board that she got around 
to mentioning she was from The Pulse. 
He didn't withdraw his offer of a 
drink, and he answered her questions 
— but his heart wasn't in it. 

As she left, the buzzer sounded. In 
the doorway was a svelte blonde, obvi- 
ously not froin a research firm. But 
this time. Don Juan took no chances. 



"You are Miss So-and-so?" he asked 
carefully. 

"There's no substitute for people 
talking to people," says Dr. Sydney 
Roslow, president, director and foun- 
der of The Pulse, Inc., and a con- 
firmed protagonist for the personal in- 
terview method of determining radio 
and tv ratings. "And there'll be no 
substitute," he adds, "as long as peo- 
ple — and not automatons — are the 
audience." 

The Pulse is a personal interview, 
aided-recall survey conducted in the 
home. It uses a printed roster of pro- 
grams and a modified probability 
sample based on U.S. Census block 
statistics and standard Sales Manage- 
ment data; interviewers have no con- 
trol over either of these. Pulse does 
not employ diaries, metering devices, 
or phone calls. (In 1954, The Pulse did 
make a move in the direction of auto- 
mation with the development of its 
DAX, an electronic peeper-counter 
that not only computed ratings but 
typed them in finished form; once de- 
veloped, however, it was promptly 
shelved.) The basic equipinent in a 
Pulse survev is shoes. Pulse inter- 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



viewers, on their round of doorbell- 
ringing, wear out an estimated 10,000 
pair a year. 

Along Madison Avenue and its coun- 
terparts across the country, it is easy 
to get into arguments over the relative 
superiority of one rating service over 
another. Some media people will tell 
you that Pulse ratings "run too high, 
favor stations and confuse timebuy- 
ers." Others are quick to retort that 
Pulse ratings "are the most realistic, 
credible, are happily free from 'freak' 
overnight rises or falls that can ob- 
scure a market picture." Critics of the 
Pulse personal interview say that per- 
sons trapped in their living rooms by 
an inquisitor are apt to come up with 
some highly suspect answers either 
through impatience or in the hope of 
being accommodating. Proponents of 
the technique say that it is psycho- 
logically sound and the only real way 
to get qualitative data (audience com- 
position, commercials recall). 

The one significant fact that tran- 
scends all argument is that in its 17 
years of history. The Pulse has never 
veered from its personal interview 
technique; the only changes have been 
enlargement of samples and expansion 
of markets. And during that time, 
clients of The Pulse have swelled from 
an original four to more than 1,400. 
To understand the growth of this re- 
search firm, it is necessary to know 
something of the man who made it. 

Stocky, soft-spoken Syd Roslow has 
come a long way since his birth, in 
1910, up in New York's upper East 
Side. But as the prototype of the suc- 
cessful executive he hasn't begun to 
keep pace with the company he built. 
The Pulse, since its 1941 beginning, 
has increased its annual dollar volume 
from $59,000 to well over $1 million. 
But Roslow, in his tastefully-appointed 
Fifth Avenue office, still greets visitors 
in his shirt sleeves with collar and tie 
stripped open. His New York office 
staff has swelled from the original two 
(himself and his wife, Irma) to 125, 
and his desk is well-equipped with in- 
ter-com and buzzers. Yet Roslow 
ignores the buttons, still sings out for 
his secretary. 

Although the facts and figures he 
deals with are often decisive in the 
purchase of millions of dollars of air 
time, Roslow remains a man without 
pretense — and without delusions. As 
one adman put it, "Syd can't even seem 
to believe in his own luck." 

{Please turn to next page) 



HOW THE PULSE DOES A REPORT ON 
STATIONS IN A TYPICAL MARKET 



4. 



1. The market: Bangor, Me., where Pulse surveys twice a year, 
March and November. 

2. In October, Pulse checks to learn of any changes in market; 
writes stations for program schedules; alerts local Pulse 
supervisor and her field crew. 

3. Checks local newspapers and TV Guide (if available), also 
program schedules that come from stations. Prepares pro- 
gram roster that the interviewers will use. 
Date of survey is set. Field supervisor brings her staff to- 
gether and gives them a refresher course [or where new 
people are used — a training course). 

5. Meantime The Pulse home office lias selected the sample. 

6. Supplies— including program rosters, sample, etc.— go to 
the field supervisor. 

7. The interview crew goes to work. Only housewives are used 
as interviewers; Roslow finds them most responsible. 

8. Local supervisor spot checks the crew while the survey is on. 

9. The completed questionnaires start to come into the mail 
room in N. Y. Pulse headquarters. {They come directly 
from interviewers.) All these envelopes go directly to one 
department where they are opened, sorted. Mail verification 
cards are sent to the homes interviewed. This is another 
check to make certain that the sample has been observed and 
that homes reported called on actually ivere interviewed. 

.0. Meantime, the tabulating department takes over and starts 
totalling replies to each question. 

At same time, the program roster department is updating 
the program schedules — entering, correcting, verifying. 

12. From tabulating, returns go to computing where the ratings 
and shares are prepared in the rough. 

13. Rough ratings and revised programs schedules are put to- 
gether. This happens in the typing department. Here for 
the first time one person sees all parts of a report. Up until 
this point no one person handles more than one page of a 
report. As fast as tabulators, or calculators finish a page 
(they work with time segments or an old report) it is 
double-checked by another person. All the way down the 
line department heads spot check for inaccuracies. 

14. Report goes to multilith for printing. Final inspection. 

15. Dr. Roslow makes final-final inspection. Reports mailed. 



11 




Pulse inter>iewers (all house^^i\es) at office for a pre-survey briefing 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




THE Pl'LSE (Co/if'rf) 

Perhaps it is this streak of increduli- 
ty — the suspicion that things are not 
always what they seem — that led Ros- 
low into the twin fields of psychology 
and research. It might also explain 
why, with a capable staff of expert 
analysts, he himself is frequently found 
checking and rechecking their figures 
with his own slide-rule. 

In his time, Roslow has probably 
rung more doorbells than any other 
figure in broadcasting. He worked his 
way through New York University 
(winding up with a Ph.D. in psychol- 
ogy) as a door-to-door researcher for 
Psychological Corp. On one such as- 
signment, in 1931, he proposed to the 
interviewer working the other side of 
the street, a pretty brunette from the 
Bronx, and also an NYU student. They 
were married the following year. 

With his wife. Irma, Roslow started 
The Pulse in October 1941. after about 
a year of pre-testing the personal in- 
terview technique. A small office at 
1674 Broadway, skimpily furnished 
with rented furniture was the head- 
quarters; the accoutrements didn't 
matter much; Roslow and his wife 
spent most of their working days out 
on the streets ringing doorbells along 
with 20 interviewers. Since then. The 
Pulse outgrew two other offices (seven 
years at US West 46th, five years at 
Fulton and Broadway). The staff of 
interviewers grew to the present 
strength of about 3,000 in some 200 
markets, doing studies also in Europe. 
Canada. Mexico. Puerto Rico, and Ha- 



waii. Chicago and Los Angeles offices 
have been added, as well as a 12-man 
London office. In the New York head- 
quarters, Mrs. Roslow^ still has her own 
office, serves as a troubleshooter ready 
to leap in when things get hectic. 

The very first clients of The Pulse 
were four New York radio stations, 
WNEW, WOV, WEAF, and WABC. 
Later in 1941, Roslow got his first ad- 
vertising agency subscriber, N. W. 
Aver, which is still one of the 128 
agencies that now use The Pulse. The 
following year he acquired his first 
advertiser client — Bulova Watch Co. 
The present list of Pulse clients in the 
advertiser, producer, and management 
bracket numbers 33. 

The list of stations that are Pulse 
clients has swelled to an average of 
about five radio outlets per market in 
about 200 markets, or about 1,000, 
plus some 250 tv stations. It is the 
broadcast surveys from which Pulse 
now derives most of its income — about 
two-thirds. The remaining third comes 
from market, product, consumer, and 
print-research. About its largest single 
survey was a special one for a tv net- 
work which needed to study a market 
before filing an application. The cost: 
S23,000. 

During the earlier World War II 
years, when Pulse was still a single- 
market survey in New York (the sec- 
ond market, Philadelphia, wasn't added 
until 1944; Boston, Chicago, and Cin- 
cinnati were included in 1946), The 
Pulse acquired a rather strange sub- 
scriber — British Broadcasting Co. It 
(Please turn to page 67) 



Spot tv o 



I his coming season the Washington 
State Apple Commission will, for the 
first time, allocate a major part of its 
consumer advertising budget to spot 
television. 

This decision is no whim but is, 
rather, based on firm test results last 
season. Then, as always before, the 
Commission began its campaign with 
primary reliance on newspapers and 
consumer magazines. As the season 
wore on, and various test results be- 
came known, spot tv kept growing. 
This year tv will lead all the way. 

The significance of the new strategy 
is simply that the Commission has 
learned through experience that it can 
generate more excitement for its high- 
ly seasonal product through spot tv. 
The Commission has a peculiar mar- 
keting problem. Its perishable com- 
modity, apples, must annually make a 
cross-country "market march." Speed, 
flexibility and dramatic impact are all 
important; spot tv, the Commission 
has learned, provides these as a matter 
of course. 

The new campaign strategy marks 
an almost complete turnabout in think- 
ing: traditionally newspapers were the 
primary medium, with consumer maga- 
zines second. This coming year, spot 
tv has an allocation of 53%, with sup- 
plemental radio claiming another 3%. 
National consumer magazines are 
tabbed for 25 '^y . while newspapers will 
pick up only about S'^/i . The balance 
goes for production, trade publications 
and special supplemental media. 

While the budgetary breakdown is 
already established, the exact figure is 
unknown because it is tied-in, via a 
levy-per-box, to production. Best esti- 
mates are that it will approximate last 
year's figure which approached $1 mil- 
lion. Of this amount, well over half is 
devoted to media advertising, while 
$200,000 goes for point-of-sale and 
other merchandising aids. 

The Commission looks to its con- 
sumer advertising for two jobs: 

• Build consumer demand — for 
apples generally. Washington State ap- 
ples in particular, and 

• Support for its extensive in-store 
"package promotion" merchandising 
plan. 

The over-all marketing problem 
faced bv the Commission, while com- 



20 SKPTKMBKR 1958 



%ds' shows proves No. 1 apple seller 



^ Washington State Apple Commission turns to spot 
television for its cross-country 'market-by-market march' 

^ Budgeted last year as a 'supplement,' air media 
bested all others in promoting a perishable commodity 



mon to other producers of perishable 
commodities, is more than a little un- 
usual. It corresponds roughly to 
launching a product into national dis- 
tribution, but doing it every year. 

Washington State apples are the 
only apples marketed and advertised 
nationally, yet distribution never 
blankets the whole country at any one 
time. At the start of the season, in 
early fall, distribution and advertising 
are concentrated in the West and 
South. As the season progresses, the 
boxcars and the campaign move into 
the southeast coast, then the upper 
Mid-Central area, finally reaching the 
Northeast after the first of the year. 

This year's budget reflects a "change 
of pace," says W. H. Sandiford. the 
Commission's account executive at 
Cole & Weber, Seattle. "The majority 
of our advertising has been concen- 
trated in newspapers for a good many 
years, but we believe the account can 
benefit from this change of emphasis," 
he adds. 

The pattern this year, will be similar 
to that tested and developed last sea- 
son. Spot tv will be used on some 70 



stations, in about that number of mar- 
kets, at a concentration of two or more 
spots a week on specific kid shows. 

"Because apples are a commodity 
that appeals particularly to children," 
Sandiford says, "we believe the par- 
ticipation-for-children shows, in late 
afternoon-early evening times, offer the 
best opportunity to talk to an inter- 
ested audience of both youngsters and 
adults." 

To add dramatic interest, the spots 
feature Lew Burdette, noted Milwau- 
kee Braves pitcher. He displays some 
baseball technique, then talks to "Lit- 
tle Leaguers" about the "big league 
energy" in Washington State apples. 

In-store merchandising and promo- 
tions come in for special attention 
from the Commission in its total mar- 
keting plan. This year's new advertis- 
ing strategy is shown in the coming 
"package promotion" plans which 
carry the theme "TV time is APPLE 
TIME." In the past the theme has 
been selected independently from such 
appeals as timeliness, variety or price. 
This year the theme emerges from the 
advertising itself. 



A national advertiser for the past 20 
years, last year was the first time the 
Washington State Apple Commission 
had ever drastically revised its media 
strategy. 1957's campaign began in 
the customary fashion with a small 
($15,0001 radio budget in the extreme 
western and southern markets. 

As distribution spread, and ship- 
ment schedules were established, the 
need for quick-acting "overnight" spot 
scheduling disappeared and newspa- 
pers moved to the fore. But the Com- 
mission found tv was producing out of 
proportion, so strengthened it to 
where it about equalled newspaper ex- 
penditures by January-February. With 
the March-May period it became the 
dominant medium. Result: from a pre- 
season "supplemental allocation" it 
finally garnered 40% of the total 
budget, compared to newspapers' 44%. 

"We saw the results of the media 
change in the statistics," notes Sandi- 
ford. "Though the 1957 crop was one 
of the largest in history, with almost 
35.000 cars, we had moved 12,000 cars 
by January 1, 3,000 more than the 
year before. Each month surpassed 
previous figures with the result that 
the record crop was moved to market 
in good order by the end of our selling 
season in June." 

The Commission's advertising and 
promotion budget is tied directly with 
the size of the crop. There is a levy 
of 5(# on each 40 pound box. A rail- 
road car holds 800 boxes. ^ 



1 1 ,'yi"g" 



the Commission will secui( 
) displays such as this 



extra point-of-sale impact by Viewing h 

vith local spot tv advertising Albertson. 




Avalanche of new products change 



^ Agencies and advertisers are revising old theories of 
budgeting and media buying for new "speed up" era 
^ No more "established" brands, say admen, as new- 
comers claim 30-90% sales volume in some industries 



l"e\v pioflucts, cascading into the 
n^rket in an unbelievable torrent, are 
profoundly changing the face of Ameri- 
can advertising, and upsetting many 
old cherished principles, theories, tac- 
tics and strategies of advertising pro- 
cedure. 

That's the one inescapable conclu- 
sion to be drawn from a just-completed 
SPONSOR study on "New products and 
what they mean." 

With newcomers grabbing off from 
30*^ f to 909* of sales volume in such 
key industries as foods, drugs, soaps, 
cigarettes, cosmetics (see box), and 
thousands of even newer products being 
readied in research laboratories the im- 
pact on traditional advertising concepts 
is truly staggering. 

Among many old-fashioned theories 
being challenged, and in many cases 
discarded are: 

• The long steady pull techniques 



of the "keeping everlasting at it brings 
success" school of admen. Nowadays, 
emphasis has shifted to short-term 
high-horsepowered campaigns for prod- 
ucts that are "here today and may be 
gone tomorrow." 

• The established brand concepts 
of 15-20 years ago when manufactur- 
ers could comfortably figure that at 
least some of their products were firm- 
1) and solidly entrenched with a loyal 
public. "Hell, there are no established 
brands any more," an agency v. p. told 
SPONSOR last week. "There are popular 
brands. But any one of them could be 
shoved out of the picture next year by 
some new improved upstart." 

• Investment spending tactics, by 
which advertisers poured back all 
jjrofits on a new product into addition- 
al advertising over a period of several 
years, are being carefully reconsidered. 
At one time P&G allowed as much as a 



ll!ree-\ear "paNout"' on a new product, 
before expecting profits. Nowadays, 
say many marketing strategists, "pay- 
outs must be shorter or the competi- 
tion will kill you." 

• Media franchises no longer are 
held in the same high regard they once 
were. Not so many years ago adver- 
tisers and agencies believed (with con- 
siderable encouragement from space 
and time salesmen) that by advertis- 
ing consistently in the Saturday Eve- 
ning Post or network radio that they 
built up a solid, and important "fran- 
chise" in the medium. At present, due 
to new product speedup, there's rela- 
tively little of this long-term franchise 
thinking, but greatly expanded empha- 
sis on short-term opportunities and re- 
sults, with radio and tv spot getting a 
bigger play for speed and flexibility. 

Behind these, and other equally revo- 
lutionary changes in advertising phi- 
losophy, lie some almost unbelievable 
new product facts. 

According to Paul S. Willis, presi- 
dent of the Grocery Manufacturers of 
America, products which did not exist 
10 years ago now account for more 
than a third of all food sales. And, 
predicts Willis, 10 years from now. 



THE SPEED-UP: THREE CASE HISTORIES 




Pall Mall, first cigarette to go 
modern, redesigned 1939, then 
stepped to 7th place in four years. 
Previously, the brand sold under 
various formulas for more than 40 
years. Now in second place and 
sales holding up better than any 
other non-filter — king or regular 




Marlboro, 30 years a ladies" filter, 
bombshelled in 1935 with the new- 
sales approach to men — climbed to 
7th place in two years. Now in 
both box and soft pack, brand's 
comprehensive advertising, mar- 
keting campaign regarded as one 
of the most outstanding in years 




Kent, which introduced Micronite 
filler in 1956 enjoyed favorable 
nicotine-tar reports by two inde- 
pendent magazine studies, zoomed 
in two years to probably 7th, possi- 
bly higher, presently includes a 
claim to 1st place in N.Y. market. 
Kent didnt exist six years ago! 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



§nI tactics 



."0% of all food sales will be in prod- 
ucts not yet on the market today. 

Grocery manufacturers are spending 
upwards of $100 million annually on 
product research, and all trade sources 
expect the tempo of new product in- 
troduction to increase sharply in the 
next few years. 

The drug field is also boiling with 
new product research, and the devel- 
i>pment process is picking up speed. 
Recently, the research director of a 
large drug firm told his staff when the 
lab problems of a new drug were 
solved, "Congratulations. Now get back 
to work and find me the drug that will 
put this one out of business." 

Many new proprietary (name brand) 
drugs are coming from the startling 
Ineakthroughs being made in medical 
-cience, and in the ethical drug field. 
"^uper Anahist, for example, was based 
nn an ethical drug introduced in 1947. 
Two years later, Warner-Lambert 
adapted the anti-histamine for over- 
the-counter sale, and applied it to new 
spray packaging, conventional lozenges 
and other forms. 

Drug men forecast mass markets for 
other new products based on ethical 
drugs in the near future, even though 
such established leaders as Bayer As- 
pirin, Listerine, Alka-Seltzer are hold- 
ing up well. 

In the soap field, where P&G reports 
two-thirds of its business in products 
not in existence 12 years ago, the big 
story, of course, is the continued rise 
of detergents. First introduced in 
1947, the swing now is toward the 
liquid form. Eventually, says the 
spokesman for a major company, liq- 
uid detergents will replace all conven- 
tional soap. 

Meanwhile though, the bar soap 
business is lathering with new prod- 
ucts and packaging changes, and with 
the introduction of color to such old 
favorites as Lux and Dial. 

In toiletries the speed-up in new- 
product developments is perhaps fast- 
est, and most furious of all. The in- 
dustry has been swept by a wave of 
new items based on research develop- 
ments — lanolin, chlorophyl, ammoni- 
ates, fluorides, vitamins, etc., and it is 
believed by leaders in the field, that 
the flow of fads, inventions, new addi- 



MAJOR INDUSTRY BOX SCORES 




Food: luuie than 33 
today's volume in new prod- 
ucts. Frozen, instant, pre- 
cooked, other convenience 
products making big growth 




Drugs: 70% of ethical jirod- 
ucts now prescribed were un- 
known 10 years ago; these 
new discoveries may dras- 
tically alter proprietary sales 




Soap: at least 65% current 
business in detergents, liq- 
uids and other products that 
didn't exist a decade ago. 
Also, old brands are revising 




Toiletries: innovations in 
formulas, additives and dis- 
pensers plus entirely new 
products account for as much 
as 80-90% of current sales 



tives, and new packaging will build in 
volume. 

Significant fact about toiletries: 
products in this category have a short- 
er average life than almost any other 
type — ranging from a few years for 
toothpastes to a few months for some 
cosmetics. 

In the cigarette industry, products 
and brands are changing positions fast- 
er than ever before in history (see 



boxj and the pressure for new filters, 
and packages has tobacco men con- 
stantly revising ad plans and schedules. 
Add all these industry facts togeth- 
er and it's easy to see why old leisure- 
ly advertising concepts won"t fit the 
modern picture. The new product ava- 
lanche is so overwhelming and so stag- 
gering that practically every old adver- 
tising textbook must be rewritten to 
deal with it properly. ^ 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Products featured in the Kroger-WERE promotion. 

Kro^'er pushed sevt-n pri- 
vate labels, 11 national 
brands in its promotion 



KROGER 
"PRIVATE LABEL" 

Tomato juice 

Pineapple-grapefruit drink 
Pork & beans 
Glazed donuts 
Wiener rolls 
Sandwich buns 
Sliced white bread 
Footballs 



NATIONAL BRANDS 

Banquet fried chicken 
Swift Premium bologna 
Carling Black Label beer 
Pepsi-Cola 

Hellmann's mayonnaise 
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee 
Sealtest ice cream 
Silver Dust soap powder 
Milani's 1890 Dressing 
Hills Brothers coffee 
Durkee margarine 



Pointing out personality tie-in in Kroger ad is Ed Paul, WERE sales 
rngr. Kroger execs diet Lowe, grocery merchandiser, Tom Kinsella, 
asst. ad rngr. and Lawrence Flynn, ad and sales prom, dir., look on 



Kroger tests new spot radio pattern 



^ This third largest grocery chain used a week-long 
saturation spot radio promotion for 35 Cleveland stores 

^ Plugging seven private, 10 national brands, the pro- 
motion tied in the station personalities with the products 



^Lvery food advertiser, and his agen- 
cy, will be interested in the pattern of 
a recent saturation spot radio proino- 
tion in Cleveland by the Kroger chain. 

The significance of the promotion 
lies in its bearing on the current battle 
between chain "private labels" and na- 
tional brands (see sponsor, 30 August, 
page 39) . 

On behalf of its 35 stores in the 
greater Cleveland area, Kroger (third 
largest chain with a 1957 gross of 
S1.6 billion and 1400 stores I pushed 
seven "private label" products, as well 
as a regional brand, a national brand 
and a non-food item via a week's pro- 
motion on a Cleveland independent ra- 
dio station — WERF'.. 

As part of the same plan, 10 national 
brand items were plugged through in- 
store merchandising. The promotion 
was called "Kroger WERE Value 
Days," and ran from 25 August to La- 
bor Day weekend. It was preceded by 
a teaser campaign on Wednesday, 
through Friday of the week before. 



The promotion had several inter- 
esting facets. First, it comprised a 
new media strategy for Kroger, using 
as it did a week-long spot saturation 
complete with a three-day preceding 
teaser. Second, it was devoted prin- 
cipally on the air to "private labels." 

A third, and somewhat unique, facet 
was the identification of product with 
personality, whereby each station per- 
sonality was given one Kroger deal to 
push. Fourth, radio was used to spear- 
head the complete promotion package. 

There's little doubt of the campaign's 
success. Grocery chains are tradition- 
ally uncommunicative about business, 
and Kroger in this case is no exception. 
But Lawrence Flynn, ad manager for 
Kroger's Cleveland division, admits 
this: "I think the idea has tremendous 
potential. It gives both Kroger and 
WERE something through mutual ef- 
fort that neither of us could buy. It 
was the most extensive campaign we've 
ever (■()iidu<ted. We certainly look for- 
ward to incorporating this type of 



promotion in some future campaign." 

Kroger has been advertising on 
WERE for four years. "During that 
time," reports station sales manager 
Ed Paul, "we have seen the trend in 
advertising of national brand foods 
develop a new concentration on the 
local level." 

Using that knowledge as a corner- 
stone the chain called in the station to 
explore ways to capitalize on this 
trend. Recalls Tom Kinsella, assistant 
advertising manager for the chain's 
Cleveland division: "We were striv- 
ing for the maximum 'retail sales ef- 
fect' aimed directly at shoppers." The 
promotion, as devised, used the strong 
merchandising idea of in-store promo- 
tion and added a completely new ele- 
ment. 

"We decided," Ed Paul says, "that 
the way to hypo the sale of specific 
items was to mechandise the air per- 
sonality directly with the product in 
three ways; on the air, in the store and 
in other media." 

The resulting promotion used WERE 
personalities in a heavy spot schedule 
on the station, in the in-store mer- 
chandising pieces and, for the kick- 
off, a product-personality tie-in in a 
"double truck" in the Cleveland Press. 

The promotion had two separate 
phases: on-the-air commercials and 
in-store displays, so that consisli nt 
cross-plugging occurred. 



^ 



20 SKI'TKMBKK 1958 



r 



In the first phase, on-the-air, com- 
mercials were devoted, with one ex- 
ception, to Kroger "private label" 
products. Quite apart from the pro- 
motion plan, but running in tandem 
with it, the station tied in its regular 
scheduled sponsors whose products 
were featured in Kroger with the pro- 
motion, though no personality was tied 
in directly. 

In the other phase of the promotion, 
the in-store displays, Kroger spot- 
lighted — with banners, pushcart dis- 
plays, end displays and shelf talkers — 
the products it wanted to feature. 
Among these were, of course, the "pri- 
vate label" items being plugged on 
WERE, but in addition there were sev- 
eral national brands. 

Featured on-the-air were Kroger 
"private label" products, each tied in 
directly with a station personality, 
with each man assigned to plug a par- 
ticular product. There were 10 spots 
each in the Wednesday-Friday teaser 
preceding the campaign. During the 
following week, 12-13 spots a day were 
used. 

The station's morning man, Ernie 
Simon, sold the chain's private label 
tomato juice and pineapple-grapefruit 
drink. Tom Edwards, with a 10:30 
a.m. to 2 p.m. show aimed at house- 
wives, had pork-and-beans. Bill Han- 
dle, with an afternoon show, plugged 
glazed donuts, followed in the evening 
by Phil McLean, who pushed frank- 
, furter rolls, sandwich buns and sliced 
white bread. From midnight to 5:30 
a.m., Carl Reese sold Banquet Fried 
Chicken, a regional item. On Satur- 
day Bob Ancell promoted the sale of 
footballs, a non-food item Kroger is 
handling. Jimmy Dudley, who does 
play-by-play for the Cleveland Indians 
on the station, pushed Swift's Premium 
Bologna during the games. The latter 
was a natural tie-in since Swift has a 
regular contract for Dudley's pre-game 
baseball show. 

If "localizing" food advertising is 
advantageous, the principals reasoned, 
what would "personalizing" add? To 
find out, the campaign went a step 
further: each WERE air personality 
had copy prepared specially to pin- 
point his particular food-sale item, as 
well as take advantage his particular 
style of presentation and delivery, and 
his show's "atmosphere." This "man- 
to-product" assignment had an addi- 
tional virtue, it is believed, through 
adding a competitive air to each man's 
(Please turn to page 68) 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



I 



TV REVENUES IN MULTI-STATION MARKETS 

Here are income figures (1957) as released by FCC 
for all U.S. markets having three or more tv stations 



Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y. . 

Albuquerque, N. M. - 

Amarillo, Tex. 

Atlar 



, Md. 



Boston, Mas 

Buffalo-Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Cedar Rapids-Waterloo, Iowa 
Charleston-Oak Hill-Huntington, W. Va. 

Ashland, Ky. . -- - - 

Chicago 111. — - - 

Cincinnati, Ohio . 



m, N. 



i-eland, Ohio - 
Colorado Springs-Pueblo, Colo. .. 

Columbus, Ohio -- 

Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex 

Denver, Colo. 

Des Moines-Ames, Iowa 

Detroit, Mich. .. 

El Paso, Tex. .. 

Evansville, Ind.-Henderson, Ky. 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Fresno-Tulare, Cal. 

Galveston-Houston, Tex. 

Green Bay-Marinette, Wise 

Greensboro-High Point-Winston 

Harrisburg, Penn. 

Hartford-New Haven-Bristol-New Britain, Conn. 

Indianapolis-Bloomington, Ind. 

Jacksonville, Fla. -. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Las Vegas-Henderson, Nev. 

Little Rock-Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Madison, Wise 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Miami-Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. .. 

Milwaukee, Wise 

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. 

Nashville, Tenn 

New Orleans, La. 

New York City. N. Y. 

Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport \eu-lIampton, Va. 
Oklahoma City-Enid, Okla. 

Omaha, Nebr 

Philadelphia, Penn 

Phoenix-Mesa, Ariz 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Portland, Ore 

Raleigh-Durham, N. C 

Richmond-Petersburg, Va. 

Roanoke-Lynchburg, Va. 

Rochester, N. Y 

Sacramento, Cal. — 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Antonio, Tex. .... 



South Bend-Elkhart, Ind 

Spokane, Wash 

St. Louis, Mo 

Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Tucson. Ariz 

Tulsa, Okla 

Washington. D. C 

Wilkes Barre-Hazelton-Scranton, Pa. .. 

Wichita-Hutchinson, Kans. 

Youngstown. Ohio-New Castle, Pa. .... 
Honolulu, Hawaii 



TOTAL 70 MARKETS 
MARKETS LESS THAN 3 STATIONS 

TOTAL 207 MARKETS . 

TOTAL 277 MARKETS 



3,329,010 
31,301,334 

7,609,081 
12,972,834 

1,162,821 

5,849,008 



7,8 



1,021 



5,358,236 
2,973,447 
15,767,107 
1,523,539 
1,361,484 

2,509,362 
6,788,065 
1,982,078 



4,525,198 
7,182,849 
2,655,448 
6,555,300 
1,815,313 
939,993 
1,888,189 

35,587,678 
1,542,551 
4,089,935 
6,460,262 
6,699,085 
8,957,996 
3,386,742 
4,554,624 

52,904,223 
3,054,129 
4,542,447 

17,812,183 
2.878,898 
9,787,303 
4,466,440 
1,437.049 
2,663,035 
2,085,528 
3,546,281 
3,072,159 
3,178,470 
3,443,524 
12,579.01 I 
5,802,093 
1,551,504 
2,473,434 
8,223,163 
3,473,198 
1,318,303 
3,409,170 



8,701,0 



The BBDO marketing setup grows 



^ Agency divides department into "brand"' and "staff" 
groups for distribution studies and campaign planning 

^ Marketing findings aid in media selections, copy 
approaches, and in promotions to trade 



I he marketing department of the 
modern agency has been growing 
more arms for client service than an 
octopus has tentacles. BBDO, whose 
marketing operation was begun under 
Ben Duffy nearly 30 years ago, is a 
typical case in point. 

A look at the charts on these pages 
will give an idea of its scope. About 
the only question left to be answered 
is: How does such an agency dove- 
tail marketing with advertising? 

At BBDO, they are dovetailed 
through a dozen sales development 
and sales stimulation techniques — be- 
fore and after the ad campaign gets 
under way. Here is how BBDO ties 
marketing in with the ad campaign. 



Before the campaign begins — 

(1) Analysis of market potential: 
What share of market does client now 
have? How can it be increased? How 
much money will it take to do it? 

(2) Distribution studies: Sources 
include syndicated services, clients, 
other research. Areas of opportunity 
are defined. 

(3) Sales projections: From the dis- 
tribution studies, reasonably accurate 
future trends can be predicted. 

(4) Potentials in special markets: 
The possibilities in such markets as 
farm, Negro, college, etc. are studied. 

(5) Package analysis: With more 
and more similar products crowding 
store shelves, this area comes in for 



heavy study. Agency may simply ad- 
vise or it may even design the package. 
(6) Field' tests and checks: BBDO 
has offices in 15 cities, can get a quick 
picture of what is happening to client 
and competitor in the field. 
After campaign is underway — 

(1) Consumer promotion: Works 
on ways to stimulate sales via trade 
channels or tie-ins, helps plan promo- 
tions. 

(2) Trade promotion: Develops 
plans for intelligent use of co-op funds 
or anything else that is pertinent at 
distributor and dealer levels. 

(3) Trade cooperation: Assists in 
securing trade paper publicity for 
client. 

(4) Point-oj-purchase activity: Self- 
service selling of today makes help in 
this area from agency marketing de- 
partment welcome. 

(.5) Media merchandising: This 
"extra" includes direct mail, personal 
trade calls, other media services. 

(6) Sales training and communica- 
tion : Agency marketing men will often 
advise on strengthening links between 
client, its management and its field 
force. ^ 



BBDO'S MARKETING DEPARTMENT 



RISTEEN 

ASSOCIATE DIR 
OF MARKETING 



TROUT 



MANCHEE 

EXEC. V-PRES. 



HEAD 

V-PiDIR. ofMKT'G. 



^M*.. 




MAYERS 


1 




1 


CRISWOLD 




DAY 



LIOEEN 
ASSOCIATE DIR 
OF MARKETING 



Oj 



BATES - OLSEN 




specific brands, i 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 





HOW BBDO REVIEWS CLIENT MARKETING 




Here is BBDO's "suggested outline" for reviewing the marketing of cli- 




ent products. It serves as a pattern 


for the agency's client presentations 1 


1. 


Statement of facts 


3. 


Objectives 


A. 


Sales history 


Th 


s involves enumerating all the objectives toward 




Should be defined year by year for a sufficient 


wh 


ich future planning should be directed. 




number of years to be significant in terms of 








dollars, units and share of market. 


4. 


Outline of future planning 


B. 


Price history by years 








This should include deals, other promotions. 


A 


Advertising plan 


C. 


Product history 




Copy: basic copy policy; examples of the 




This covers quality problems that may have 




basic copy idea; copy themes directed to 




been encountered; product improvements; any 




special groups or areas; possible copy tests. 




swings in consumer preference between client's 




Media: specific media recommended; the cost, 




product and competitive products; the pack- 




amount and schedule of advertising in each 




age, and changes that have been made. 




medium; possible media tests. 


D. 


Competition 

Principal competitive brands, nationally and 




Trade advertising: basic copy policy; ex- 






amples of the basic copy idea; copy themes 




locally; competitors' business in terms of vol- 




directed to special groups or areas; possible 




ume and trends ; advantages of the competitors 




copy testing; specific media recommended; 




vs. the client. 




cost, amount and schedule of advertising in 


E. 


The market 




each medium; possible media tests. 




Is it growing, declining or static? Who uses 


B. 


Promotion 




the product? Who makes buying decisions 




This covers specific dealer promotions; speci- 




among retailers and wholesalers? What 




fic consumer promotions; timing of promo- 




changes are taking place in consumer income. 




tions; possible promotion tests. 




population, distribution patterns? 


C. 


Selling activity 


F. 


Consumer attitudes 




This includes the amount and type of sales 




What do consumers like or dislike about 




work. 




client's and competitors' products and why? 


D. 


Special activities 


G. 


Distribution 




These are to meet problems or exploit oppor- 




The distribution picture at all levels; the 




tunities in media, promotion and/or sales. 




strong and weak markets and the reasons. 


E. 


Possible product changes 


H. 


Advertising expenditures 


F. 


Possible package changes 




A history by years; cost per unit; % of sales. 


G. 


Possible pricing changes 


I. 


Selling expenditures 


H. 


Possible research projects 




A history by years; cost per unit, % of sales. 


I. 


Establish overall timetable 


J. 


Promotion expenditures 


J. 


Summary of expenditures 




A history by years; cost per unit, % of sales. 




In total dollars related to projected production 


K. 


History of advertising 




and as % of net sales; broken down by media. 




Media strategy; copy philosophy and themes; 




promotion, testing, by sales areas, etc. 




can ad effectiveness be pinned down? 






L. 


Summary of product facts 










5. 


Summary 


2. 


Problems and opportunities 


A. 


Significant facts 


The identification of problems and opportunities 


B. 


Problems and opportunities 


comes from an analysis of the facts as outlined, in 


C. 


Major objectives 


the section above. 


D. 


Recommended plan 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SHORT WAVE: 
the quick route 
to sales 
in Latin America 




Waltor S. Lemmon, president of the World Wide Broadcasting Sys- 
tem. The potential for advertisers is tremendous south of the border 



^ In countries south of the border, more than half of 
the 16 niilHon radio receivers have short wave bands 

^ American Express is one of many U. S. advertisers 
who use short wave to boost their sales in Latin America 



\^n one of hi? frequent trips to Latin 
America recently. American Express 
Co. vice president James A. Henderson 
was surprised at the impact on local 
businessmen of a short wave broad- 
cast in English from New York. The 
show, which reached more than 
100,000 American and Latin Ameri- 
can businessmen, offered stock market 
reports on some 200 stocks and dis- 
cussed business and market trends. 

Henderson was especially impressed 
because one of his responsibilities is 
to advertise American Express Trav- 
elers Cheques. In fact, AE has a 
more than $1 million ad budget (via 
Benton & Bowles I to sell these Trav- 
elers Cheques. This Latin American 
business audience seemed perfect for a 
short-wave pitch from the U.S. on 
Travelers Cheques. 

When Henderson returned to the 
I .S., he ordered a 13-week schedule 
on the show, called American Business 
Bulletins, over WRLL. the interna- 
tional radio station with studios in 
New York and a 50.000-watt transmit- 
ter just outside Boston. The buy in- 
volved two 10-second spots a day, five 
days a week. 

In buying time on WRUL fthe only 
private enterprise radio station broad- 
casting on a commercial basis to Latin 



America I American Express joined 
many other far-flung U.S. advertisers 
using short wave to reach the Latin 
American market. For example, Mer- 
rill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith 
have been using American Business 
Bulletins for about 10 years, with ex- 
cellent results. Another investment 
counselor. United Business Service of 
Boston, also sponsors the show. 

Other WRUL advertisers include 
Philco International Co.; Firestone In- 
ternational, which sponsors broadcasts 
of the Indianapolis 500 Race to Latin 
America; Texaco and Mennen, co- 
sponsors of the World Series baseball 
broadcasts to Latin America; General 
Dynamics, United Fruit, Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways, and Minnesota 
Mining & Manufacturing, all spon- 
soring institutional programs over 
WRUL. 

Some of these shows are in English 
and are broadcast directly by WRl L: 
others broadcast in Spanish and Poi- 
tuguese are channeled into the Inter- 
American Network, a chain of 82 sta- 
tions in all Central and South Ameri- 
can countries. Philco International, for 
example, uses WRUL for both English 
broadcasts and also the Inter-Ameri- 
can Network. Short wave in Latin 
America, unlike the U.S.. is mote the 



rule than the exception — for over eight 
million of the 16 million existing sets 
are equipped for short wave. 

After only a month, reaction to 
Travelers Cheques' short-wave radio 
spots has been gratifying. Here, for 
example, are some typical letters re- 
ceived by American Express: 

• From Santiago, Cuba, a busi- 
ness man wrote, "When we go north 
for our vacation, we usually use an- 
other type of checks. From now on, 
nothing but American Express." 

• From Montevideo, Uruguay, an- 
other businessman assured AE that 
"As of now, I will assure you all I 
will buy is Travelers Cheques, start- 
ing with $2,000 worth I need for a trip 
today." 

• From St. Thomas in the Virgin 
Islands came this letter, with a prom- 
ise of even more future business: 
"Three hundred fifty of us at the oil 
camp listen to your broadcast regu- 
larly, and all of us will certainly use 
American Express Travelers Cheques 
in the future. And we're waiting for 
the day when AE credit cards are 
available so we can use them also." 

Walter S. Lemmon, president of 
W Orld Wide Broadcasting System 
I which operates station WRUL) be- 
lifves that this kind of reaction proves 
the impact of international radio ad- 
vertising. "And," adds Lemmon, "with 
the increasingly closer ties between the 
Americas and with the eventual sta- 
bilizing of Latin America's economy, 
the countries south of the border will 
bo worthvvliilc markets for interna- 
lional a.K.Mlisers.- ^ 



SPONSOR • 20 SKPTF.MBKR 10.i,'l 



RADIO BASICs/sEPT 

Facts & figures about radio today 



1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 




1958 


1957 




48.9 
radio 
homes 


1 


f 


48.1 
radio 
homes 




1 

50.8 
U.S. homes 


■ 

50.0 
U.S. homes 




ye°aT 


-^--- 


millions. ■ 


July each 



Radio set index 



locatio 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

Total 



95,400,000 
37,200,000 
10,000,000* 


90,000,000 
35,000,000 
10,000,000 



142,600,000 135,000,000 





Radio station index 








End of August 1958 








stations CPs not New station 
on air on air requests 


New station* 
bids in hearing 


Am 
Fm 


1 3281 1 95 1 424 
1 558 1 86 1 43 

End of August 1957 


1 


109 

30 


Am 
Fm 


1 3068 1 148 1 340 
1 520 1 30 1 37 


1 


109 
5 


Source: FCC 


monthly reports, commercial .tatlons. 'December each 


ye»r. 





i 



Radio set sales index 



488,495 597,848 

186,379 256.279 



3,452,833 4.236,453 
1,650,898 3,090,955 



erly RHTTMA), Home figares are I 



2. NETWORK RADIO ADVERTISERS 



TYPICAL MAJOR NETWORK RADIO CAMPAIGNS 



Audiences reached 


No. different homes 


Commercial minutes j^^^| 


comm'l minutes 


Sponsor 


reached (000) 


Sponsor c 


elVd. (000) 


BRISTOL-MYERS 


13,143 


FORD DIVISION— FORD MOTORS 


119,139 


BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO 


12,769 


BRiSTOL-MYERS 


87,923 


FORD DIVISION— FORD MOTORS 


12,769 


LEWIS HOWE CO. 


69,023 


MIDAS, INC. 


12.716 


MIDAS, INC. 


68,760 


LEWIS HOWE CO. 


12,395 


WRIGLEY 


68,538 


LORILLARD 


11,220 


BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO 


66,409 


CHEVROLET— GENERAL MOTORS 


10,792 


PLOUGH, INC. 


42,086 


L PLOUGH, INC. 


10,792 


CHEVROLET— GENERAL MOTORS 


41,664 


EX-LAX, INC. 


10,098 


EX-LAX, INC. 


38,945 


ARMOUR & COMPANY 


9,724 


UNITED MOTORS — GENERAL MOTORS 


36,987 


Source: Nielsen Radio Inde 


.. covering four weeks ending 


12 July. Data shovn. are for campaigns on individual networks. 





SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



With more and more film being used, SPONSOR ASKS: 



Has local television become a fit 



As syiidicattMl and fealure film 
sales soar in most markets, three 
station men <liseuss the effects of 
film programing on tv industry 

Howard L. Wheeler, gen. sales mgr.. 

klljrr. Los Angeles 




This is a loaded (|iiesti()ii. 
The answer, ohviousK. is that while 
feature and syndicated film form an 
extremely vital area of local program- 
ing, local television is by no stretch of 
the imagination a film medium. Live 
programing is, and always will be, an 
essential ingredient of local program- 
ing fare. 

The reason is that a television sta- 
tion needs live programing to establish 
an identity in its market. If a station 
programs all film (or network) it just 
dispenses programs without relation to 
the markets or its people. Such a sta- 
tion is merely an outlet. A successful 
station must serve its viewers with lo- 
calized appeal and public service, or it 
will not be able to build a unique 
image in its market. It would become 
just another channel number. 

This season KHJ-TV inaugurated 
live programing that has stirred trade 
talk across the country. The program 
which has received most of the pub- 
licity is, of course, The Oscar Levant 
Show which attracted newspaper com- 
ment from coast to coast. Witty, un- 
restrained and utterly unpredictable, 
Oscar has taken Los Angeles by storm. 

KHJ-TV has just signed Don Sher- 
wood, described in a Time magazine 
article as a "mad, mess, high-pressure 
San Francisco disk jockey (who is I 
the highest-paid record spinner on the 
\^est Coast and the electronic darling 
of the \ia\ area. ' 



"Sherwood's range of 14 characters 
includes Bart Hercules, 'a music mon- 
ster with a Liberace voice, who teaches 
weight control to women and peddles 
yogurt from goats that care enough to 
give the very best,' and Fidel True- 
heart, M.D., a gowned physician who 
lectures on 'The Human Body; Its 
Care and Prevention.' 

Former heavyweight champion Max 
Baer also does a show for KHJ-TV, 
each weekday night from 11 p.m. to 
12 a.m. Max, almost everybody knows, 
has been touring the nightclub circuit 
with Slapsie Maxie Rosenbloom, but it 
took his own television show to bring 
his talents to a fine focus. 

Even the news reflects KHJ-TV's 
"'personality." John Willis twice a day 
presents what is undoubtedly the most 
comprehensive local news coverage on 
Los Angeles television. His ability to 
find the humorous approach to appar- 
ently ordinary stories makes him a 
television personality with a genuine 
sense of showmanship. 

William D. Pabst, ge". mgr., KTVV, 
San Francisco —Oakland 



Good local 
shoivs can 
counterpoint 
1^" ^^ net pro^rarnin^ 



HtM 



Being the newest television station in 
the San Francisco area and its only 
independent, we are daily asked the 
question: "has local television become 
a film medium?" 

In the past, this has been all too 
true. But local television need not stay 
a film medium. 

Old arguments upon the part of net- 
work affiliated stations are repeated all 
too often and taken for whole-truths 
rather than half-truths. 

Do these sound familiar? "The local 
tv audience wants star-name appeal!" 
■'Film is the only way possible for an 



advertiser to maintain a low cost-per- 
1.000." "Film is dependable, doesn't 
arrive drunk, and eliminates high over- 
head production costs." 

These so-called arguments in favor 
of film programing are outlawed at 
KTVU as they are at many of the na- 
tion's energetic independents. 

Being independent, we can pick and 
choose our programing. If a live show 
is worthy enough, we'll put it in the 
competitive evening hours against net- 
work shows and let it stand on its own 
merits. We've yet to be disappointed 
. . . and so have our advertisers. 

Our formula has been ". . . if we 
can do a good show, then well do it, 
if we can't, then it stays off the air." 

We've been on the air just six 
months; in that length of time we've 
been highly selective in our local 
shows. One, of which we're extremely 
proud is Doctors' News Conference, a 
weekly donnybrook between science 
writers and authoritative physicians on 
all kinds of personal health problems. 

Collegiate sports — football, basket- 
ball, spring events — have all been tied 
up for television by Channel 2 — KTVU. 
We need three sportscasters to cover 
all our weekly local sportscasts; so we 
hired the best three we could find 
from a national talent search. 

Children's programing? We've got 
a television academy award winning 
personality in Dr. Tom Groody and 
his thrice-weekly Science Capsules se- 
ries; we've got educational, entertain- 
ing, programing in our local It's Chris 
and Captain Satellite shows, making 
up a weekly total of more than four 
hours of local, live programing for 
youngsters. 

Energetic, independent television 
(that's what we like to call KTVU) is 
a station that has spent nearly S2-mil- 
iion on good half-hour and feature 
length packages. We're the first to 
admit that film has its place in tele- 
vision; but we're also the station to I 
defend our top-flight local performers, | 
personalities, sportscasters and news- j 



20 SKPTEMBKR 1958 



ijedium? 



John C. Cohan, president, co-owner & 

gen. mgr.—KSBW-TV Salinas, Calif.— KSBY- 

TV San Luis Obispo, Calif. 




All television stations, regardless of 
size or market, must deliver an audi- 
ence commensurate with costs, to 
achieve results for the advertiser, 
whether local or network. 

Can local programing quality com- 
pete with network and syndicated film 
to accomplish this goal? That is the 
question. It takes creative ingenuity, 
versatile personnel and constant effort 
to win this gamble. But it can be done. 
Local television has not become entire- 
ly a film medium. 

Uncle Gary, Clarence the Camera, 
Lucky the Lion, Elmer, and The Fox 
are characters unknown outside the 
coast and northern San Joaquin Valley 
of California. However, they are liv- 
ing, intimate, close friends of the thou- 
sands of moppets served by KSBW-TV 
and KSBY-TV. 

Our live news program, TV News 
Digest, is a rhapsody in musical chairs. 
Scheduled 6:30 to 7 p.m. nightly, 
Monday through Friday, it features 
six five-minute segments, back-to-back, 
and has become the major news source 
for this area. 

Another notable live program suc- 
cess is Junior Auction, the talk of the 
42 towns served by our stations. It 
has sky-rocketed sales of the sponsorV 
product over 1,000% as the children 
accumulate the advertisers' labels in 
return for the right to bid on prizes. 

A live Spanish-language program on 
Sunday morning, plus plays by Hart- 
nell College Players and other live tv 
shows, follows our concept that local 
television must present more than film 
and network if it is to do an all-around 
job in this vital medium. «^ 





It just takes one BIG one • • • 

Just as One Rig Putt Can Make all the Difference 
in the world in golf . . . one big station can make a world of 
difference in your Mid-Gulf TV coverage. 

WKRG-TV dominates this 
BILLION-DOLLAR Mid- 
Gulf Area in all three 
rating services (Nielsen, 
ARE and Pulse) . Now, 
something new has 
been added . , . 

NEW, TALLER TOWER ADDS GREATER MID-GULF COVERAGE 

Even before, Nielsen gave WKRG-TV 46,000 extra families 

in the Mobile Market. Now, a new maximum-height tower 
sends WKRG-TV's better programming booming into tens of 
thousands of additional Mid-Gulf homes ... as the map 
below clearly shows. For full details of WKRG-TV's lead, 
call your Avery-Knodel man ... or C. P. Persons, Jr., 
V.P. and Gen'!. Mgr. of WKRG-TV. 





WKRG-TV 



E, ALABAMA 
. Avery. Knod 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



z 





i 



every time buyer 
reads 



^Gf^ 



©Ol* 





BUT FOR EVERY TIMEBUYER 
THERE ARE TEN OTHER DECISION 
MAKERS BEHIND THE SCENES 
WHO READ SPONSOR AS WELL 



Rarely indeed does one man alone determine when and 
where to place radio or TV business. That's why 
it makes sense to reach every decision maker possible 
with your message because every voice that helps 
to finalize a sale should know your story. 

It's the chief reason your advertising will do so 

well in SPONSOR. SPONSOR reaches almost everybody 

who is anybody in air. All the timebuyers, of course, 

but more decision makers, too, at every level (in 

both the agency/advertiser category) than any 

other broadcast publication. 

Proof? 

Fair enough! 

SPONSOR is the only broadcast publication that 
offers a complete circulation breakdown BY" JOB 
CLASSIFICATIONS— listing the exact number of 
subscribers (with their names and titles) at every 
management level. We'll be happy to show it to you 
at your convenience and prove beyond doubt that 
SPONSOR reaches more teams that buy time than any other 
book in the field. 



SP0N30R 

I sells the TEAM that buys the TIME 



0\ist like Paul 
anc£ bi^ kntern 




people 

REACT 

to the 

voice and vision 

of NBC in 

South Bend - ElKhart 

call Retry today! 

WNDU-TV 

BERNIE BARTH & TOM HAMILTON 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

You're in good company when 
you join smart time-buyers who 
select WGN to sell millions of 
dollars worth of goods for to{> 
drawer clients. Exciting new 
programming in 1958 makes 
WGN's policy of high quality 
at low cost even more attrac- 
tive to vou. 

WGN-RADIO 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 




SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

General Foods Corp., Post Division, Battle Creek, Mich., is plan- 
ning a campaign in major markets for its Alpha-Bits cereal. The 
schedules will start 1 October for six weeks. Minutes during day- 
time segments will be placed; frequency will depend upon the mar- 
ket. The buyer is Dave Allen; the agencv is Benton & Bowles, Inc., 
New York. ' 

Standard Brands, Inc., New York, is entering top markets with a 
campaign for its Fleischmann's Yeast. The schedule begins 22 Sep- 
tember for 13 weeks. Minutes and chainbreaks during daytime slots 
are being used, with frequencies varying. The buyer is Harold 
Veltman; the agency is J. Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, is preparing a campaign 
for major markets for its Cheer detergent. The schedules start 1 
October, run for the P&G contract year. Minutes during nighttime 
slots will be placed; frequency will depend upon the market. The 
buyers are Charlie Buccieri and Marcia Roberts; the agency is 
Young & Rubicam, Inc., New York. 

American Chicle Co., Long Island City, N. Y.. is planning a cam- 
paign in scattered markets for its Dentyne gum. The 13-week sched- 
ule starts 1 October. Minutes during nighttime periods will be 
scheduled; frequency will vary from market to market. The buyer 
is Jim Kearns; the agency is Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., N. Y. 

The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, is getting ready to go into 
top markets throughout the country for its Crisco. The campaign 
will start 1 October, runs for the contract year. The advertiser will 
use minutes during fringe nighttime slots, with frequencies varying 
from market to market. The buyer is Grayham Hay; the agency is 
Compton Advertising, Inc.. New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Bristol-Myers Co., New York, is kicking off a campaign for its 
Minil-Rub. The schedules start 29 September for 13 weeks. Minutes 
during daytime periods will be slotted; frequency will depend upon 
the market. The buyers are Ed Green and Lou Bullock; the agency 
is Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, Inc., New York. 

Tetley Tea Co., Inc., New York, is going into major n:arkets to 
promote its teas. The nine-week schedule starts 22 September: this 
is the campaign's second flight. Minute announcements, 6 a.m. to 
6 p.m.. Wednesday through Friday, are being used; frequency de- 
pends upon the market. The buyer is Bob Karlan; the agency is 
Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, Inc., New York. 

Peter Paul, Inc., Naugatuck, Conn., is entering top markets for its 
Peter Paul Mounds and Almond Joy candies. The six-week cam- 
paign starts 29 September. I.D.'s during daytime periods will be 
aired; frequency will vary from market to market. The buyer is 
Jim Kearns; the agency is Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. Inc., New York. 



20 SF.PTEMBER 1038 







Integrity — track record — confidence — these are the cornerstones 
upon which the founders* of Independent Television Corporation 

have built a vital new force in television programming in the United States 
and abroad. ITC is dedicated to provide the television industry with 

dynamic properties, sales and service facilities without equal. 
Watch ITC — Independent Television Corporation. 



*The Jack Wrather Organization ("Lassie," "The Lone Ranger, ' "Sergeant Preston of the Yukon," Muzak, Disneyland hlotel and 
in association with Edward Petry and Co. KFMB-TV, San Diego and KERO-TV, Bakersfield.) Associated Television, Ltd. of Eng- 
land (television station operators, program producers, theatre owners.) Carl M. Loeb, Rhoades and Co. (investnnent bankers.) 

iNi>E:p£:i^DE:i^'r television corporation^ 

WALTER KINGSLEY. PRESIDENT 

Temporary Headquarters: Hotel Roosevelt, New York 



I 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



47 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 



RADIO RESULTS 



PERSONAL MANAGEMENT 

Sl'ONSOK: Col.Ulii,!,! Plan C... \(;KNCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Goldshield Flan Co., a personal 
faniiK finaiue nianagomenl company, which specializes in 
aiding; families who are unable to meet their monthly bills, 
began advertising on WPOP. Hartford, Conn., on 15 Janu- 
ary, 1957. From the start they were reluctant to try radio. 
Previously the company had been using newspaper, but re- 
sults proved disappointing. The first schedule Goldshield 
purchased 24 spots per week. As the campaign gained mo- 
mentum, more and more people came to Goldshield for as- 
sistance in meeting their obligations. On two occasions the 
firm was forced to cancel their advertising in order to hire 
enough trained personnel to handle all the customers. At 
present, they are using 44 spots per week and have had tre- 
mendous response to their campaign. As a result, Goldshield 
was forced to double its staff and move to larger quarters. 
The company uses no other medium. The schedule includes 
saturation minutes throughout the week in all time periods. 
WPOP. llarlf..nl Ann„i.nc.-ments 



HOUSES 

SPONSOR: General Finance Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: More and more people have taken 
advantage of the services offered by finance corporations in 
the last few years, and many finance companies, including 
the General Finance Corp. of Evanston, 111., have taken ad- 
vantage of radio's power to reach people. This finance com- 
pany, with a branch office in Rockford, 111., has used radio, 
especially WROK, for several years. Each succeeding year 
has shown tremendous increases in the company's radio 
advertising on WROK. General has been advertising in 
WROK's sports programs. White Sox baseball, high school 
football, basketball, golf, Golden Gloves and Sports Review. 
The company uses "Friendly Bob Adams" to deliver mes- 
sages. The loan company's entire radio budget is placed on 
WROK. "We at General feel sure that the 51% increase we 
have chalked up in Rockford is solid proof in dollars and 
cents that WROK reaches an important segment of the Rock- 
ford adult audience." said General v. p. R. J. Trenkmann. 



WROK, Rockford 



Announcements 



DEPARTMENT STORE 

SPONSOR: J. J. Newherry Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: For seven months, the J. J. New- 
berry downtown Los Angeles department store had been 
using a nightly 15-minute Mexican-produced "soap opera" 
on KWKW, to reach the L.A. area Spanish-speaking popula- 
tion. To measure its effectiveness, the store decided to use 
all three announcements one evening to promote a two-hour 
sale the following day. Leader item: "white sheets." No 
other advertising was used to reach this audience. Store 
manager Joseph L. Packard reports that more than 1,500 
Latin-Americans attended the sale. The promotion, which 
Packard rates "an outstanding success," was accomplished 
for a total cost of .S27. Packard notes the extreme loyalty of 
Latin-American audiences to a sponsor once he has gained 
their confidence through advertising. The advertiser also 
feels that the emotional impact of a soap opera show con- 
tributes substantially to the effectiveness of the commercials. 



FINANCE 

SPONSOR: Carder & Eden. Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Carder & Eden, Inc., general build- 
ers and contractors of Albuquerque, New Mexico, contracted 
to build a score or more houses in the Southern Terrace 
Subdivision in Albuquerque. The houses were priced in the 
$16,500 to $20,000 bracket. Upon completion of the houses, 
Carder & Eden purchased advertising in the various local 
media, including a schedule of announcements on KQUE, 
Albuquerque. In a matter of a few days after the start of 
the campaign, the contracting firm had sold every house they 
constructed. In fact, people from neighboring towns came 
to the city to view and possibly purchase a home. The suc- 
cess of the campaign was attributed largely to KQUE. "In 
the future, when another opportunity arises for us to erect 
more houses in Albuquerque we will certainly call upon 
KQUE to run our advertising," stated Charles Carder, part- 
ner of the firm. "It was truly a successful venture." 



KWKW, Lo. Angeles 



Program KQUE, Albuquerque 



Announcements 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




And the fourth ''R"— Radio — is strong, too! 

It's a very healthy educational picture in Metropolitan Washington. 409 
elementary schools. 88 secondary public schools. Well over 100 parochial 
and private preparatory schools. 21 universities and colleges. And more 
impressive than statistics on structures is the individual attention given 
the student. Current expense per public school pupil is $322 — compared 
to the U.S. average of $300.* It's not that Metropolitan Washington sets 
a higher value on education. It's just that the efforts of officials and citizens 
alike seem to head the class. 

Washington's fourth "R" — Radio — gets high marks as tvell, 
especially when you use Station WWDC. The July PULSE 
showed us with an average weekly audience share of 19.8% — 
almost tivo full points ahead of our closest competitor. And eight 
of our programs were in the Top 15. We have a simple formula 
— to be a listenable station to our audience, and a promotional 
station to our hundreds of national and local advertisers. The 
mutually happy result — ever-increasing listeners for us, ever- 



increasing sales for you. 



WWDC 



adio Washington 



*Eeonomic Development Committee, Washington Board of Trade 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR A CO. 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



THE WORLD'S MOST FABULOl 




156 CARTOO^ 



BRAND-NE 




Copyrighted by Capitol Records y~-^ 



TATIONS 



NATURAL 



H I G HE 



:lown 




II MAGNIFICENT ANIMATION 

ILL COLOR- ESPECIALLY MADE FOR TELEVISION 

(Now — Jayark brings to TV the most successful personality ever conceived. 
^ BOZO is pre-sold to countless millions of children and grownups. Bozo's 

universal appeal and sales impact have never been equalled. 

BOZO'S CARTOON STORYBOOK 

156 Cartoons — Each 6 Minutes — Full Color or B/W 
Magnificent Animation — Packed with Action — Loaded with Laughs 

BOZO and his friends will keep your viewers in suspense and in stitches. 
They travel to the moon . . . They climb Mt. Everest . . . They even "run" 
Macy's and Gimbels. Each thrilling cartoon is jam-packed with action 
and jaw-cracking laughter . . . No Cliff-Hangers! 



AVAILABLE WITH ANIMATED COMMERCIAL LEAD-INS STARRING BOZO HIMSELF 

Backed by huge merchandising and promotion. BOZO merchandise items now carried 
in stores, coast to coast. More than 13 million BOZO Capitol Albums already sold! 
BOZO is a guarantee of absolute top-rated cartoon leadership in your market. 

Fresh, new and pre-sold, BOZO is sure to deliver the lowest cost-per-thousand audience 
.. .sure to deliver unparalleled impact in advertising results! 





ACT NOW WHILE BOZO IS STILL AVAILABLE 



JAYARK FILMS CORPORATION 

Reub Kaufman, President 

15 East 48th St., New York 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2636 



i^TINGS 



PRODUCED IN HOLLYWOOD BY LARRY HAR MON-TED TICKTIN PRODUCTIONS FOR JAYARK RELEA; 



GREATER 




FOR SPOT BUYER 



Sylvester sees Red 

and ''Hippity Hops'' to new sales jjeak! 

Sylvester Scott, Jr., juvenile market timebuyer, credits soaring client's sales 
to WJAR-TV's unique children's program, "Hippity Hop, the Cartoon Cop" 
— a typical example of WJAR-TV's highly effective creative approach to spe- 
cial programming. 



In the PROVIDENCE MARKET 

WJAR-TV 

is cock-of-the-walk 
in creative programming! 





CHANNEL 10 • PROVIDENCE, R.I. • NBC-ABC • REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 

52 SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Marketing tools, trends, 
research data and trade tips 



FILM-SCOPE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 Jack Wrather's purchase of TPA this week for $13 milHon could be the fore- 

runner of a string of acquisitions for his new film company, Independent Televi- 
sion Corp. 

This week's buy takes ITC off the ground immediately. Even though it has $10 million 
in production commitments from Jack Wrather productions and Britain's Associated Rediffu- 
sion, the company had no product ready for immediate distribution. 

TPA gives the new organization a string of subsidiaries (foreign and domestic) as well 
as its staff and 12 syndicated series currently in distribution. 

ITC also named a network national sales manager this week. He's Hal James, formerly 
v.p. in charge of tv-radio at DCS&S, and before that at Ellington & Co. 



Continental Baking (Ted Bates) gave the status of syndication a big boost this 
week. 

The company renewed CBS TV Film's Annie Oakley for two years in 76 markets. (Its 
fourth and fifth.) Time and program costs over the two-year period: $3 million. 

A second major regional buy this week: Rival Dog Food (Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli), 
for MCA's If You Had a Million. 

The area: Ten East Coast markets. 

The discrepancies in pricing even among first-run syndicated product is becom- 
ing more and more a headache for both syndicators and stations. 

A case in point: Two new shows, both prime products from top syndicators, were pitched 
recently to the same Philadelphia station. Price for Show A, for two episodes, ended up at 
$600. Price quoted for Show B, of similar caliber, was $1,200 per episode. 



Stations are starting to stockpile strip shows much in the same way they do 
feature films. 

The reason is this: there's a wealth of good, new stripping product, but fewer time 
availabilities due to the heavy network daytime emphasis. 

The result: stations are buying what's available now (Life of Riley, Bums & Allen, etc.) 
with no plans to program them in the immediate future. 



If this season's ratings are anything like those over the summer months, syn- 
dication can look forward to a good year. 

A Film-Scope spot check of several markets shows some strong inroads by syndicated 
series. Most impressive gains: in multi-station markets. 

A good example is in the five-market results of Silent Service (CNP), Sea Hunt (Ziv) 
and State Trooper (MCA). Here's how they did in the August ARB: 





SILENT SERVICE 


SEA 


HUNT 


STATE TROOPER 






AUDIENCE 




AUDIENCE 




AUDIENCE 


CITY 


RATING 


SHARE 


RATING 


SHARE 


RATING 


SHARE 


Baltimore 


19.2 


46% 


25.1 


56.4% 






Chicago 


22.8 


42% 


20.2 


33.4% 


25.3 


46.4% 


Cleveland 


19.2 


45% 


22.0 


42.4% 


19.3 


26.7% 


Detroit 


18.2 


38% 


17.8 


74.8% 






Miami 


16.5 


46% 







28.1 


55.2% 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Key trends and developments 
in marketing and research 



MARKETING WEEK 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 While "he-man" ad themes have had some success of late, one marketing con- 

suhant warns of certain dangers in that approach — if directed to men. 

Our '"feminine" contemporary culture does not value the frontier-type of masculinity 
says Dr. John Kishler. Hence, most men regard he-man brand images as far fetched. 
"At best," he declares, "they appreciate them with a certain wry humor as caricatures and, at 
worst, they tend to resent them as being too unrealistically demanding." 

For women, however, it's another story. Today's woman tends increasingly to blame 
her dissatisfaction on men ("rather than on the consequences of their own aggressive domi- 
nance"), and sees in Fantasy, the he-man putting everything right. Super-masculine 
themes, therefore, are meaningful. 



The $200,000 tv campaign involving 24 furniture retailers, which gets under way 
22 September with TvB's blessing involves a technique that could well be copied by any 
number of retail businesses. 

Brain-child of Robert S. Kohn, president of Denver's American Furniture Co. (a three 
store chain), the campaign involves identical retail price promotions of furniture made 
by seven manufacturers. 

The idea came to Kohn after a successful spot tv saturation drive (involving hard-sell 
price promotions) early this year to boost lagging sales. Result of the drive was a 50% hike 
in his business over the previous year. 

Kohn set up a firm which he called Bold Action Furniture Sales, Inc. With TvB's help, 
he sold the idea to 23 other retailers at the annual furniture market in Chicago last spring. 

Bold Action is the key to the drive. It arranges with manufacturers for pricing and 
production of specific items (Kohn gets an override on manufacturers' sales to the other re- 
tailers) ; it arranges for production of commercials, which are tailored for each retailer so he 
can be identified by viewers; it even acts as an agency in some cases, buying time for 
retailers. 



While furniture sales have been running about level with last year, despite the recession, 
the furniture industry is not particularly happy about the long-term outlook for 
the furniture business. 

During the past 10 years, while the percent of disposable income spent for big-ticket items 
such as appliances and autos has risen substantially, the figure for furniture has fluctuated 
between plus and minus 10%. 

One reason : prices have gone up only slightly. 



Kroehler, one of the furniture manufacturers involved in the Bold Action promotion 
(see above) has taken a plunge into motivational research to find out ways of creat- 
ing more interest in home furnishings. 

Some of the findings: A woman looks forward to furniture shopping like she 
looks forward to visiting a dentist. She doesn't trust her own taste, is full of fears and 
frustrations. One problem is that she knows so few brand names. The fifth best-known 
furniture "manufacturer" in the U. S. is, believe it or not, Duncan Phyfe. 

Another problem: there are three distinct family strata, each with its own 
needs, goals and attitudes about furniture. 



SPONSOR • 20 SFPTDMBER 19.58 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



^ WASHINGTON WEEK 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 ^1^^ long-dormant Harris subcommittee returned to life this week, but it was 

Copyright 1958 ^ ' 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. doubtful that it would get into more tv cases before November. Bernard Goldfine 

and the FCC were still making good copy. 

Harris' House Commerce Legislative Oversight subcommittee still has in its files material 
bearing on a number of contested tv cases which Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.) has said runs 
upwards of 20. The Arkansas Democrat added that in all these cases the present license- 
holders are in as much jeopardy as National Airlines with Miami Channel 10. 

The Boston Channel 5 case is a prime string in the subcommittee bow, but the Appeals 
Court may have taken some of the sting out of it by remanding the case to the FCC. The 
FCC was directed, as in the Miami case, to hold hearings aimed at deciding whether the li- 
cense should be cancelled because of improper pressures on FCC commissioners. 

Where former FCC commissioner Richard A. Mack was the center of the Miami prob- 
lem, former FCC chairman George McConnaughey is reported to be at the center of this one. 

McConnaughey also figures importantly in another case, Pittsburgh Channel 4, on which 
the subcommittee has virtually completed its preliminary probing. The subcommittee has 
also done considerable work on Miami Channel 7, and has said it has not finished with one 
case tying together three St. Louis and one Springfield channel. 

The subcommittee has been great on starting into tv cases one after another and drop- 
ping them all in midstream. Whether it will ever tie it all together is a big question. It is 
a cinch that if Harris ever intends to do so, he will have to have the group reconstituted 
next year. 



Meanwhile, in the first and only genuine upshot of the Harris hearings except 
for Commissioner Mack's resignation, the FCC plods ahead with its Miami Chan- 
nel 10 remand case. 

Seems the special hearing examiner has a son-in-law, who happens to be chief counsel 
and vice-president of Pan-Am, and Pan-Am suddenly proposed to assume a minority stock in- 
terest in National Airlines, and National Airlines is the parent company of Public Service 
Television, holder of the Miami Channel 10 license under attack. 

The question is whether Horace Stern, retired Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice, and 
hired because of the prestige he would bring to the eventual FCC decision, should be dis- 
qualified. If so, the Commission would have to look for another hearing examiner, and every- 
thing would have to start once more from scratch. 

There is no disposition among the four applicants for the Miami channel to move for dis- 
qualification of Stern. The Justice Department wasn't concerned about any conflict of inter- 
est. The FCC counsel in the case, Edgar Holtz, emphatically wanted Stern to remain. 

The actual hearings bordered on the duU. They consisted of replays of selected portions 
of the testimony already presented on Capitol Hill. The FCC in the first week seemed to be 
going a pretty good job of disqualifying Col. A. Frank Katzentine for all manners of ap- 
proaches to Richard Mack. 

It was due in the second week to lay the groundwork for the same sort of hatchet job 
on National Airlines. The other two applicants had apparently clear records. 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



A round-up of trade tcdks, 
trends and tips for admen 



^ SPONSOR HEARS 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 P&G completes a three-wav parlev in tv this fall by being the No. 1 customer 

sPONsoR'rBuU'rToNs ,Nc. ^^^'^ CBS TV, NBC TV, and t^ spot. ' 

Chrysler, with its two weekly hours, remains the top client at ABC TV. 



Two reps — one a pioneer in the field — are bent on retirement. 

One of them wants to quit because of poor health; the other wants to spend more of his 
e on other interests. 



Watch for other drug manufacturers to follow Carter's lead in diversifying 
into the high-profit dietetic food field. 

Carter's present pair in the low-calorie sweepstakes are the Frenchette and Maysonette 
salad dressings. 



This passing social note may be a clue to the values that NBC TV and ABC TV 
place on Chicago in the tv cosmos: 

ABC TV accompanied its closed-circuit preview of its fall program schedule for the press 
and agency men with cocktails and a luncheon. NBC didn't frill it up with so much 
as a cup of coffee. 



Disregard those rumors that Art Porter's expansion of responsibilities at JWT 
to include supervision of the Chesebrough-Pond account suggests a change in the 
status of the agency's media department. 

The fact is that JWT's media department has become stronger than ever as an autono- 
mous operation. Dick Jones recently was made a v.p. and its manager. 



When Neil McElroy, now Defense Secretary, was P&G ad chief, he laid down a rule 
(totally implied) that agency men who serviced the account have never forgotten. 

The precept: A P&G agency shouldn't come to Cincinnati to discuss a project un- 
less it had a recommendation, too. 

In other words, the agency was expected to have the whole thing worked out. 



As wage earners in the business of advertising, station rep salesmen manage to graze 
where the clover is rich. 

Their average income in New York: $12,000 in radio and $15,000 on the tv side. 

One of the bigger rep firms rewards the cream of the crop annually with between $20,- 
000 and $25,000 in radio, and from $25,000 to around $32,500 in tv. 



Could it be that WLS, Chicago, among the first farm stations, will wind up un- 
der the full ownership of ABC? (ABC already has a minority interest in it.) 

Leonard Goldenson, AB-PT chief, was in Chicago the past week discussing the 

proposition with the management of the Prairie Farmer, owner of the majority stock. 

Several weeks ago ABC induced WLS to grant it equal representation on the WLS, 
Inc., board of directors. 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



LOOKING NORTH 

you see how things are 
looking up in Kansas City 
This is part of the $250 mil- 
lion reclamation project hon- 
ored by Look last spring. 



^"m-' 




»»*«vIt' 



4 A 




Kansas City: groundwork for better living 




This is not where a bomb or tornado struck. 
It's part of the area cleared of slums and 
tenements in Kansas City during the past 
year. It's a typical face-lifting project which 
won for Kansas City one of Look magazine's 
Community Home Achievement Awards 
for 1958. 

Such a $250 million project goes to show 
what we've been saying. Kansas City's a 
look-alive town. Eyes on the future. Plans 



for the future. Money to spend right now 
to make life better right now. 

More than a million people live here. And 
more of this million watch KCMO-TV at 
more times of day (say ARB and Nielsen) 
than any other station. 

Why so popular, KCMO-TV? We talk Kansas 
City's language. And we get to Kansas City 
loud and clear. We broadcast at maxi- 
mum power from the world's tallest self- 
supported tower. 



ansas 



City MO-TV 



SYRACUSE 


WHEN 


WHEN-TV 


The Katz Agency 


Represented nationally by Katz agency. 


PHOENIX 


KPHO 


KPHO-TV 


The Katz Agency 


Meredith Stations are affiliated with BETTER 


OMAHA 


WOW 


WOW-TV 


John Blair & Co.-Blair-TV 


HOMES and GARDENS and SUCCESSFUL 


TULSA 


KRMG 




John Blair & Co. 


FARMING Magazines. 



NEWS & IDEA 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Haniin'!' Beer took the lead away 
troin Piel's as the best-liked tv 
eoinniercial in .\RB"s August. 19oK 
poll. 

After Piel'?. according to ARR. 
comes Dodge and Winston, tied for 
third place, and then: Wrigley's Gum; 
Alka-Seltzer and Seven-Up; Ivory and 
Newport: and Chevrolet and Raid. 

Sheaffcr Pen got itself a raft of puh- 
liiity hy h> pothetically betting SI mil- 
lion that warm-hearted sentiment will 
sell more pens on tv than the "blood 
and thunder adventures now dotninat- 
ing the tv screens." 



Al >lakc for Sheaffer are the two 
>|)ecials it signed for this fall, via CBS 
TV, featuring "'sentimental favorites: 
Little Women and The Gift of the 
Magi. 

(Campaign's of the week: 

• Playskool Manufacturing Co. 

began the biggest spot tv campaign in 
its history last week, to run through 
10 December, for a total of $100,000. 
Seven cities will be used, including 
New York, Chicago. Los Angeles and 
Boston. Agency: Friend Reiss Adver- 

• Mary Ellen's Distributors, of 

Berkeley. Cal., begins its first year- 
round campaign on tv for its jams and 



jellies. The companN will sponsor 
Treasure, shown on KRON-TV. San 
Francisco: KCOP-TV, Los Angeles: 
KSL-TV, Salt Lake City; KLZ-TV, 
Denver and KOOL-TV, Phoenix. Agen- 
cy: Guild, Bascoin & Bonfigli. San 
Francisco. 

• The Michigan Consolidated 
Gas Co. begins its new campaign with 
the theme: "So much more for so 
nmch less — Gas naturally" via 16 ra- 
dio stations in the state and announce- 
ments on 5 tv stations. Agency: Mac- 
Manus, John & Adams. 

• Cocilana Wild Cherry Cough 
Nips will be introduced in a satura- 
tion spot radio campaign to start 13 
October, for six months in Northeast- 
ern markets. Agency: Emil Mogul. 

• Ralston Purina Co. will use ap- 
proximately 85% of its stepped-up ad 
budget in network tv this fall, via 
ABC TV's The Rifleman and Leave It 
To Beaver. Supplementing this, will 
be local radio and tv spots in selected 
markets. Product: Purina Dog Chow. 




PICTURE 
WRAP-UP 




Set' for >()in>..lf : Tlii 
Goht'l Show (M5(:-TVi 
(;uI>Ip. \irwrs will l)f 



XCIU-. Ir..in llie 21 Octolj.-r Geo 
will 1)1- partially reproduced in 
a>ked to hold color photo up to tv 
rti(<- hetuecn c<,lor. black-and-white 



End of the rainbow: Richard Wolfson (r), assistant to 
pres.. WTVJ, Miami, presents $1,000 check to June Johnsc 
winner of station's "Treasure Hunl." Watchiim. husband, son 



Enjoying a coffee break at the Housewives' Protective League's recent 
presentalion for apency p( rMinnel are (I to r) John Trent, HPL dir., WCAU, 
Phila.; Vic Seydel, radio/tv dir., Anderson & Cairns; Galen Drake, HPI. 
dir., WCBS, N.Y.; Morgan Baker, HPL dir., WEEL Host.; Phil Norman. 
HPL dir., KNX, L.A.; Rudolph Klagstad media dir., Monroe F. Dreher, Inc. 




Agency: Gardner Advertising, St. 
Louis. 

Strictly personnel: Edward Ball, 

appointed director of advertising and 
sales promotion, and Francis Beu- 
dert, promoted to manager of sales 
planning and market research, Miller 
Brewing Co. . . . John Marchetti, in- 
dustrial engineer of General Foods, to 
Dr. Pepper-, Dallas. 

AGENCIES 

"A majority of modern advertis- 
ing and selling is technically good, 
hut it is not great because it lacks 
the 'adventuresome idea.' " 

So said Ernest A. Jones, president 
of MacManus, John & Adams at a 
meeting of the Denver Ad Club last 
week. 

"It is ironic that the Old Pro in his 
search for serene security of the sure 
thing," Jones continued, "should en- 
gage in the most dangerous practice of 
all: depending upon last year's ideas 



in today's market. 

"Some remarkable things are being 
accomplished in selling because the 
man with the off-beat idea didn't know 
il was impossible." 

A majority of the 4A'8 members 
report better business this year, 
compared to last. 

This was the result of a poll of 225 
of the 335 members. The findings: 

1) Agency billings for the first six 
months, 1958, compared to same peri- 
od. 1957: 113 agencies ahead; 81 down 
and 30, the same. 

2) Estimates for the second-half 
1958, compared to 1957: 100 agencies 
expect business to go up; 61, down 
and 61, the same. 

Western agencies showed to be 
the most optimistic about the fu- 
ture, predicting, by more than 3 to 1 
that their billings will be up during 
the second half year. 

Ted Bates & Co. held the first of its 
series of 13 intra-mural lectures last 



week. The talks will cover all phases 
of agency operations, with the closing 
session devoted to a question and an- 
swer period. 

Agency appointments: Cole, Fish- 
er & Rogow, Inc., New York and 
Beverly Hills, for the Bon Ami Co. . . . 
Grant Advertising, for Swanson's 
Cookies Co.'s Archway Cookies . . . 

BBDO, for Oneida, Ltd Mohr & 

Eicoflf, for the 707 Co., New York 

Campbell-Ewald, for the new W JR- 
TV, FHnt, Mich. . . . Wunderman, 
Ricotta & Kline, for the Columbia 
LP Record Club . . . Compton, for 
the Military Electronics Div., Motorola 
. . . H. W. Kastor & Sons, Chicago, 
for Neuhoff Brothers, Dallas packers. 

Personnel moves: Maxwell Sapan, 

appointed v.p. and creative director of 
Bryan Houston, Inc. . . . William Cor- 
ley, manager of the Atlanta and Mi- 
ami offices of Communications Coun- 
selors . . . Wendell Holmes, to the 
copy and technical group on AC Spark 



Big gun is used by Ziv Tv to demonstrate its 
World Of Giants series, which has been in and 
out of network M'hedules. SMrroiindin.2 pistol (1 

t(i 1 I. Mai-airi -;,,,ii. I.u K\aii^. Mai-aiila Clark 





#® 




i**.-.'! 


■L^JbT^ 


Mm 




i^M 



A hit ^ith tho vack: Poking fun at to 
(la>"s fashions, Ileatlicr Andrews struck 
the right note of humor with the judge- 
in the WQAM, Miami "Teen Fashion" 
contest. P'or first pri/.c, she gets all-e\ 
pense tri]) for two to Xa'isati, phis $.'ili 



Rilli-: 





Ctittiiig-up i> Kthel Weider, P&(; lime 
linver at Compton. in response to Blair 
T\ 's Do It Yourself book, promoting firm's 
"Purse-Suasion"' davtime spot tN -ales plar 



They have nothing on but . . . KBOX, 

Dallas, new Balaban station, has models 
deliver attache case to Norman Campbell, 
of BBDO, Dallas, as part of its promotion 




This is an 
IDIOT STICI 

16 months of spadework j 
and \VS()C.T\ has L>:! 

Wc call it: 




Plugs, at D. P. Brother & Co. . . . and American Machine & Foundry. 



IF YOr HAD A MILLION 



Check and buy 

WSOC-TY 

Charlotte, N. C. 

H-R Reps Nationally 
F-J Reps Atlanta 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

You're in Rood com puny when 
you join smart time-buyers who 
select WGX to sell millions of 
dollars worth of goods for top- 
drawer clients. Exciting new 
programming in 1958 makes 
WGX's policy of high quality 
:it low cost even more attrac- 

WGN-RADIO 



Harry McQuiston, art di 

Nides Cini Advertising. Beverly Hills 
. . . Earl Cole, to the copy depart- 
uient. Tatham-Laird . . . Bennett 
.\(le9, to the staff at Executive Adver- 
tising. Chicago. 

NETWORKS 

The latest owner of MBS, the 
Scranton Corp., has upped Blair 
Wallister to executive v. p., which 
makes him the operating head of 
the network. 

Alexander H. Guterma becomes 
chairman of the MBS board and Hal 
Roach, president. The Scranton Corp.. 
a holding company for the J. F. Jacobs 
Co., of Detroit, which is in the auto 
parts business, also owns the Hal 
Roach studios. 

Mutual now numbers 446 affiliates. 

More than 10,000 representatives 
of the press, ad agencies, spon- 
sors and station affiliates watched 
a special NBC TV closed-circuit 
colorcast last week. 

Purpose: To preview the networks 
fall line-up of shows and stars. 

Robert Sarnoff, chairman of the 
board, and Robert Kintner, president 
of NBC, introduced the show. 

In line with its fall programing 
promotion, a series of motorcades 
has been set-up by NBC's Exploi- 
tation department to take place in 
more than 22 major NBC TV net- 
work affiliate cities. 

Dubbed "Cavalcade of Shows," this 
24-vehicle motorcade will carry ban- 
ners and posters bearing the names of 
NBC TV programs. 

ABC's election night plans: News 
chief John Daly will head a staff of 14 
commentators on 4 November. The 
special will air on both tv and radio 
from 10:00 p.m. until control of Con- 
gress is determined. 

Network salies: Frigidaire has 

placed a 52-week order for segments 
in five NBC TV daytime shows: Treas- 
ure Hunt, Concentration, The Price Is 
Right, From These Roots and County- 
Fair. Agencv : Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sam- 
pie. 

Sports: On ABC TV, The MU- 
ler Brewing Co., for All Star Golf; 



for Bowling Stars. 

Station affiliation: New vhf station. 
WKBW-TV, Buffalo, signed as a pri- 
mary ABC TV affiliate, effective when 
the station goes on the air. 1 December. 

REPS 

Lindey Spight, one of the original 
founders of Blair, has resigned as 
^ .p. and manager of the tv offices 
in San Francisco. 

He will continue to serve both Blair- 
Tv and Blair-Tv Associates in an ad- 
visory capacity. 

Ned Smith, formerly general man- 
ager of KOVR-TV, Stockton, takes 
over Spight's area. 

Competition between national spot 
salesmen and national network 
salesmen is "a healthy thing." 

So said Robert E. Lee, member of 
the FCC at the SRA luncheon last 
week. 

"No condition should prevail that 
would dilute artificially that competi- 
tion." Lee continued. 

He added that station reps "came 
\ ery close to being the salvation angels 
of the radio business." 

Rep appointments : George P. Hol- 
lingbery Co. for five stations: 
KLIK, Jefferson City and KHMO, Han- 
nibal, Mo.; KSAY, San Francisco; 
KEEN, San Jose and WTTM, Trenton, 
N. J. . . McGavren-Quinn Corp., 
for WITH, Baltimore; WXEX-TV, 
Richmond; WLEE, Richmond; and 
WUSN-TV, Charleston, S. C, in all 
areas except New York. All but the 
latter will be represented in New York 
by Select Stations . . . John E. 
Pearson, for KFAL, Fulton, Mo . . . 
Bob Dore Associates, for KLRA, 
Little Rock and WCHB, Inkster & 
Detroit . . . H-R Tv, Inc., for KJEO- 
TV. Fresno; WTOL-TV. Toledo and 
WJMR-TV, New Orleans . . . John 
Blair & Co., for WMBR, Jackson- 
ville, effective 1 January. 1959. 

They were elected: New officers of 
the year-old Radio and Tv Representa- 
tives of Atlanta: Dick Hughes, of ■ 
Petry, president; Gregg Murphy, 
Katz, v.p., and George Crumbley, 
Headley-Reed, secretary-treasurer. 

About people going places: Ken- 
neth R. Atwood, account executive 



20 SKI'TKMBKR 1958 



in the Chicago office, CBS Radio Spot 
Sales . . . Frank Carlson, to the 
radio sales staff, Avery-Knodel . . . 
W. F. Shoemaker, regional sales 
representative, National Retail Spots. 
Inc., Hollywood . . . Dick Lawrence, 
program consultant for Jack Masla & 
Co. . . Andrew Powell, tv account 
executive in the New York office, PGW 
. . . Tom Brown, sales account ex- 
ecutive, Forjoe & Co. 

Petry TV has added three to its staff. 
Charles Coldwell, to the sales staff 
in New York and Robert Miller in 
Chicago. Myrna Price, to the pro- 
motion-research department. 

FILM 

MCA's Paramount library sales 
should shoot up when the com- 
pany incorporated its first rating 
report in its sales message. 

WBZ-TV, Boston, premiered the 
package this week with Going My Way. 
The Sunday afternoon feature scored 
a 34.0 ARE co-incidental, with 73.1% 
share of audience. 

With 1 October airing dates less 
than two weeks off, sales are mak- 
ing the big news. Among the sales 
this week : ) 

• Four regional renewals on Ziv's 
Highway Patrol, bringing the total of 
renewed markets to 132. 

The buyers: Kroger Stores, for 
Kansas City, Louisville, St. Louis and 
Roanoke: Weidemann Brewing and 
Household Finance, for Cincinnati 
and Indianapolis; Alabama Farm 
Bureau, Montgomery and Birming- 
ham; and Johnson Tire Co., Casper 
and Grand Junction. 

Other renewing sponsors include 
Ballantine (in 35 markets) ; Handy 
Andy Stores, San Antonio; Safeway, 
Tulsa; B&H Stores, Mobile; Super 
Food Stores, Shreveport; Standard 
Oil and R. J. Reynolds, Kalamazoo. 

In addition, 19 stations have re- 
newed the series. 

• Another Ziv show, Mackenzie s 
Raiders, has fulfilled alternate-week 
sponsorships for one regional sponsor. 

For Brown & Williamson, which 
has' the series alternate-week in 19 
markets, the other sponsors are: Lin- 
coln Income Life Insurance, Louis- 
ville; French Broad Dairy, Knox- 
ville; Stroh Brewing, Cleveland and 
Bay City; Frontier Oil Co., Buffalo; 



Schlitz, Milwaukee and Washington. 

Other recent buyers of the series 
include Bunker Hill Meat Packing, 
Charlotte. Bluefield, Washington (N. 
C). Columbia and Bristol; American 
Motors, San Francisco; Blue Plate 
Mayonnaise, Houston; Zeigler 
Packing Birmingham; Bank of St. 
Louis, St. Louis; Ideal Baking, 
Tyler (Tex.) ; Child's Stores, 
Alexandria (La.). 

Thirty-one stations also bought the 
series. 

• P&G (B&B) this week 
bought CBS TV Film's Whirly- 
birds for a 52-week Tide campaign 
in Los Angeles. 

• Chock Full O'Nuts (Grey) 
has bought Ziv's Target for New York. 
(WCBS-TV) 

• Twelve new stations have signed 
for ABC Film's re-run series. Adven- 
tures of Jim Boivie. 

At the same time, ABC Film an- 
nounced 13 new sales of its Special 
Six package of Rank features. 

• NTA's Dream Package has been 
sold in 85 markets to date. 

• Jayark's Booz the Clown cartoon 
series was sold in 36 markets this 



Name change: ABC Film Syndica- 
tions move into other fields has 
prompted the company to change its 
name. 

New name: ABC Films, Inc. 

Re new series: Screen Gems has 
purchased tv rights to Ensign O'Toole 
and Me. Series will be prepped for 
next fall . . . Filming starts in No- 
vember for the third UA tv produc- 
tion, The Troubleshooters. Series will 
star Keanan Wynn . . . Twenty-one 
new films have been added to the 
Encyclopaedia Britannica Film Libra- 
r\' . . . NTA is prepping 39 episodes 
of The Third Man. No pilot, no 
sponsor yet. James Mason will star . . . 
Jan Clayton will star in her own show 
being produced for next fall by 
Samuel Marx and Woodmere Produc- 
tions. 

Personal Appearance tour: Target 
host Adolphe Menjou is off to Buffalo 
and Minneapolis this week on behalf 
of two sponsors. 

Strictly personnel: Ziv expanded 
and reshuffled its sales staff this week. 
The changes: Jerry Kirby, upped to 




on radio-- 



Today let's get 
down to brass 
tacks and talk in 
explicit terms of 
how Radio KMA 
delivers sales — 
real cash sales, 
without give- 
aways or gim- 



EX AMPLE: On 
August 30 May 

Seed Company Aiiilm.ij, J. 

started advertis- Koelker, 

ing Minnhafer Manager 

oats, a neiv vari- Radio Station 

ety that is rust KMA 

and disease re- 
sistant. The kick-off talk on KMA co- 
incided with the Nebraska State Fair 
opening in Lincoln, where the company 
operated an exhibit booth. 

In one week 5,000 bushels were sold 
at the Fair exhibit alone. 12,649 
bushels were sold during one week and 
a supply of 22,000 bushels will be gone 
by the time this is printed. Mind you, 
selling oats in September for spring 
planting is pretty much unheard of. 

EXAMPLE: The distributor for 
Magic Thread, a miracle fabric mend- 
ing liquid, I $1 postpaid I over a steady 
9-month period on KMA received al- 
most 8,500 orders. He advises KMA 
topped 8 Midwest stations advertising 
the same offer. 

EXAMPLE: Tidy House Products 
Company tested two $1 premium and 
box top offers during two weeks in 
August {supposed to be dog days I . 
KMA produced 2,534 orders in 14 
days. «. « * 

EXAMPLE: Joe Zweiback, owner of 
Vitamin Industries, Omaha, believes 
KMA-land is a healthy market. He's 
been a 52-week advertiser for 15 con- 
secutive years. 

EXAMPLE: Joe Cans at Maxwell- 
Sackheim, New York, says "You're 
only as good as yesterday's mail 
count." Joe is understandably cagey 
about releasing figures, but he might 
tell you about the thousands of silicone 
ironing board covers KMA sold for 
him. 



AMs 



(lOmMA) SHENANDOAH, IOWA 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



('Iiiraiio sale^ manager: Jack Greg- 
ory, to Los Angeles as western divi- 
sion head: Alan Martini, to New 
^ ork as eastern division head; Jack 
(»ainey, to the west roast as a spot 
sales manager: Othur \. Oliver and 
Joseph L. Moscato, named North 
lentral division account executive: 
Robert INeece, re-assigned to upstate 
New York. 

\iso. Bert WeilancI, re-assigned to 
Baltimore-Washington; Ed Uhler, 
added to the eastern division as ac- 
count executive: Charles Rush, to 
the south central division in the same 



An analysis of the rates of all 
174 private coniniereial stations 
in Canada shows that in Class "A" 
time both the flash rate and the 
one-minute announcement rates 
have decreased, while the radio 
homes continue to show an in- 
crease. Here are the figures: 





No. Radio 




Cost 1 




Homes 


No. of 


Min. On 


Year 


(000) 


Stns. 


All Stns. 


1957 


3.930 


166 


$10.95 


1958 


3,9.55 


174 


10.94 



■apa 



CANADA 



Revlon returned to Canadian radio 
this week with its biggest single 
purchase on CJMS, Montreal. 

The campaign: The French station 
has built a special radio feature for 
Revlon. It will be presented seven 
limes a day, six days per week, and 
will include a well known personality. 

The Br<»a(h-ast Advertising Bureau 
of Canada has released its study 
of radio rate and circulation 
trends. 



Feud; In a letter to Jack Tietolnian. 
president. CKVL, Verdun, P. Q.. 
J. Nadon, manager, CJMS, Montreal 
states that CKVL resorted to "uneth- 
ical" practices by offering listeners 
prizes if they were tuned to their sta- 
tion while the August survey was being 
conducted by EUiot-Haynes. 

Nadon held CKVL's reasoning for 
this — to increase the sets-in-use figures 
— as "too laughable to be taken seri- 
ouslv." 

Agency appointments : McCann- 
Erickson (Canada) Limited, for 

the Canadian Westinghouse Co.. with 



••J.4XIE" WELCOMES PABST BREWiDlG 
COMPAJ^Y TO WFGA-TV 

The Pabst Brewing Company has joined the Honor Roll of Prestige Advertisers 
who chose WFGA-TV to carry its sales messages to more than a quarter million 
Horida-Georgia TV homes. "Highway Patrol", with Broderick Crawford, is being 
sponsored by Pabst from 9:00 to 9:30 PM on Wednesdays. This top rated show in 
I)rime time— combined with WFGA-TV coverage of 64 counties— provides Pabst 
Brewing: Coinpanx with unl)eatable selling power. 




I! Better take another look at the high- 
ly eompelilivr .|a(ks<,nville television 
market, ,1a. k-onx illc is no l.ui^.T a 
Onr Slali„n ina.k.i. and liic \p.il. 
19-,8. Pul-r nai.i,-,! \\K(,\T\ Jack- 
sonville's Nuinh.i Onr Malinn. For 
more infonnai hm,. .,,11 Italph Mni- 
mons in .Iaek>.M,Mll. ai I.I -in r.-.HBl. 
or contact vnui nr,,i.-l l'.(..\\. repre- 



NBC— ABC 

Represented nationally by Peters, Grif- 
fin, Woodward, Inc. 



WFGA-TV ^''^""®' ^2 

WW! \Mr% I W Jacksonville, Florida 

FLORII>A'S COLORFUL STATION 



responsibilities for the change-over 
from Studio One to Westinghouse's 
Desilu Playhouse . . . Robert Otto & 
Co. (Canada) Limited, for three 
new accounts: Proctor Electric Can- 
ada Limited. Filtro Electric Limited 
and Solaray Vibratory Massager. 

Personnel across the border: 
Robert Harris, appointed director of 
research. F. H. Hayhurst Co. Limited 
. . . Gerard Fecteau, director of news 
services, Tv De Quebec (Canada i 
Limitee . . . Ira Dilworth, director of 
program evaluation. CBC. Toronto . . . 
Bob Aiken, to the sales staff. CJMS. 
Montreal. 



RADIO STATIONS 

Lucky Lager Brewing Co. led the 
list of the top 20 spot radio ad- 
vertisers (during the second quarter. 
1958) named by RAB in its new studv 
of spot radio clients. 

The next nine top program users, in 
order, according to RAB, were: Shell 
Oil; Fruit Industries; Scandinavian 
Airlines; International Union of Elec- 
tric Workers; UAW; Ford; Esso 
Standard Oil; Kiplinger Washington 
Editors and the Massey-Ferguson In- 
dustrial Div. of Massey-Harris-Fergu- 
son, Inc. 



Pause in Boston: WHDH reprinted 
an Associated Press Avire about John 
Foster Dulles having his driver slow 
down on the highway so that he could 
hear a newscast before boarding his 
plane. 

WHDH headlined its ad : "How .Im- 
j portant is Radio News?" and con- 
cluded with: "Those who make the 
news depend on radio for the 
news." 

Station sales: K.CMJ. Palm Sprini:~. 
to Louis Wasmer and Cole Wylie. b\ 
the Palm Springs Broadcasting Corp. 
. . . WRRR, Rockford, 111., to a group 
dubbed Radio Ro<kford, Inc., for 
$227,900. (Brokered by Hamilton. 
Stubblefield. Twining & Associates.* 

Ideas at work: 

• To celebrate its power iiurca-r 
from 1,000 to 5,000 watts. WE>0 
staged an all-day promotion in down 
town Nashville last week. To wit: 'Wsn 
models, dressed only in barrels with 
'•All we have on is WENO" on tlie.n. 



Reprinted from World Telegram and Sun 

Depression or Buyers' Strike? 



> LYLE C.WILSON, 

ASHINGTON, April 1 
If old timers who we 
.11 nd for the big dcpit 




day— Ma' 
plush offices by ^'Kh^vvindoNvs MR^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ 
'"'' \heTdewalk of^^sound^bank^^^^ 

"The U.S. in 1^:'.. 
.thou- soon was off on w 



5- plop di 
h belov 



,adof the 



Shoestring specul 






Me weie FHR spent 

;mploytd P"'';'"^^"' 'J^^ 

md FDR and go aw av 

it looked 5 5 






Country 



,anks began 



dif- to fold. City bank^ 



folded, spending campaig 



of political debate ir 

matter of fact b 

tether there is or is not a " 

in the works or p 

the early autumn p 

1929. The big depression 

^ then with a bangety- 

mg >vhich blew the cellar of 
the New York Stock -Ex- 
change down somewhere in- 
to the rocky sub-structure of 
Manhattan Island. That's how 
haid and fast stocks fell on 
Ef the black Thursday and black 
Friday that marked the end 
I' of the Coohdge boom. 



lolesale closi 

Roosevelt 
■esident with 
imediately cl 



,,ed all of the recor 
t them against clusi. 
frightened de- By 



ONLY 
YOU 

CAN DETERMINE 
WHICH 







Yes it's true — only the retail merchant is really in a 
position to find out his customers' frame of mind. Many 
experts regard the present period as due to the consum- 
ers' desire to be wooed and won and many retailers have 
already had truly surprising results when they went out 
and "asked for the order." 

"Do people have the money to spend?" 

You bet they do ! The facts show another big upswing 
in the works. U. S. population will soar between now 



and 1975. That means more jobs, more income, more pro- 
duction, more savings, more research., .wio/e needs of 
all sorts than ever before in our history! 

How about it? Depression or buyers strike? It's up 
to you! 

FREE! Get goivg today! Write at once for illus- 
trated "How To Turn the Tide" booklet offering 
valuable and vital selling ideas. The Advertising 
Council, 25 West 45th Street, New York 36, N. Y. 



YOUR FUTURE IS GREAT IN A GROWING AMERICA 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 19.58 




In the leadership spotlight 


i 


BOYAR'DEE 


^ 


coMPim 

PIZZA 

PIE MIX 



Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

You're in good company when 
you join smart time-buyers who 
select WGN to sell millions of 
dollars worth of goods for top- 
drawer clients. Exciting new 
programming in 1958 makes 
WGN's policy of high quality 
at low cost even more attrac- 
tive to you. 

WGN-RADIO 



and a o.OOO-piece watermelon feast at | 
a local shopping center. I 

• To emphasize the "Let's Save 100 
Lives" safety campaign hy the Iowa 
Department of Safety, KIOA, Des 
Moines, tied in with a "Dennis the 
Menace" contest. A free car was 
awarded the listener guessing all the 
missing parts of Dennis' alleged car. 

• WPEIV, Philadelphia, is sending 
out Season's Greetings a bit early this 
\ear. including, with it. membership 
in the W PEN Executive Book Club. 
The station will be sending out top se- 
lections each month through Christmas. 

Station staffers: Robert D. Bla- 
shek, becomes president and general 
manager of KCMJ, Inc.. Palm Springs 
. . . Tom Flynn, manager. KERN. 
Bakersfield, Cal. . . . Wayne Vaughn, 
tc WGBS, Miami, as national sales 
executive . . . Melvin Bailey, pro- 
gram manager for WBZ & WBZA, Bos- 
ton .. . Arthur Tolchin, elected to 
the board of directors, WMGM, New 
York . . . Max Friedman, special 
sales representative, WCOL, Columbus, 
Ohio . . . Gil Newsome, program di- 
rector and Michael Ruppe, circula- 
tion director, KWX. St. Louis . 

TV STATIONS 

Norman Cash, TvB president, 

speaking before the Public Utilities 
Advertising Association in Atlan- 
ta last week, had this to say about tv 
and how to use it: 

"Tv is proving itself admirably 
adapted to the needs of the utility or 
public service company faced with 
the necessity not only of selling its 
cervices but of getting the public 
to understand its problems as 
well." 

Cash concluded on this note: "You 
people, whose companies pay more in 
taxes than for anything else, have not 
only got to use advertising effectively, 
but use advertising that will reflect 
credit back to you." 

Station sale: WWTV, Cadillac, to 
Fetzer Tv, Inc. 

New call letters: WMBR-TV, Jackson- 
ville, became WJXT last week, and 
will continue as a primary CBS TV 
affiliate. 

Sports note: The Gulf Oil Corp. is 
in for one-third sponsorship of the 
nine professional football games tele- 



CBS 



The SELLibrated (and only full 
powered) station In the 

GOLDEN VALLEY 



WHTN 




In San Francisco, audiences respond to 

vf^nvs mnsiral formula beamed to San 
tnilies. From New York to 
>, advertisers know that KOBY 



San Francist^-, ««.v... 
motivates the market 
If your fav 



ite tune is Happy Days are 
played by thousands of ring- 
2\as"h"rebisters . . . then ifs time you 
lied your Petry Man. He'll show you 
e rating facts and give you the big rea- 
ns to buy KOBY in San Franciscol 



KOBY 



10,000 watts 
San rrancisco 

Sit in with your PETRY Man 

In Denver ifs KOSI- 

in Greenville. Miss.-WGVM 

Mld-Amerlca Broadcasting Co. 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



cast via WCBS-TV, New York, this 
fall. The other two-thirds are for Marl- 
boro and Ballantine Beer on a net- 
work basis. 

Ideas at work: 

• Tv has revived an old Saturday 
afternoon at the movies fad — remem- 
ber the heydey of the yoyo contests? 
Now it's hula hoops, with WNBQ, 
Chicago, running a special live color 
show this week: a contest of 25 kids, 
chosen from some 10.000 neighbor- 
hood finalists. 

• WNEW-TV, New York (former- 
ly WARD) is pushing good health via 
a public service spot campaign: slides 
and audio copy suggesting periodic eye 
examinations, good posture, etc., along 
with the tag, "Channel 5 wants you in 
the best possible condition to enjoy a 
great line-up of new fall shows." 

Thisa and Data: To\-) Ten Dance 
Party, a live syndicated teen-age se- 
ries, is spreading out: sold to KSL- 
TV, Salt Lake City; expanded sched- 
ule on WSLS-TV, Roanoke; and re- 
newed bv WHEN-TV, Syracuse, 
WTEN, Albany, WDXI-TV, Jackson, 
and WXEX-TV, Richmond . . . 
WLW-A, Atlanta, named top tv win- 
ner in the Georgia Association of 
Broadcasters competition for promot- 
ing the "Deathless Weekend" cam- 
paign . . . One of the bigger local mass 
buys of daytime tv in the midwest: 
by National Food Stores, via KSD- 
fV, St. Louis, for a $100,000 .52-week 
renewal of the Shopping With Char- 
lotte show. 

On the personnel front: William 
Flynn, appointed national sales man- 
ager and Kenneth Willson, local 
sales manager of WAGA-TV, Atlanta 
. . . Constance Blackstead, program 
manager for the North Dakota Broad- 
casting Co.'s KXJR-TV, Valley City, 
Fargo and KXAB-TV, Aberdeen . . . 
John Leitch, director of engineering 
and Charles Lynch, comptroller for 
WCAU & WCAU-TV, Philadelphia . . . 

New appointments in line with the con- 
solidation of WOR and WOR-TV, New 
\or-k: George Brown, director of 
news and special events; Marvin 
Camp, manager of press and p.r.; 
Stan Lomax, director of sports and 
Herb Saltzman, named merchandis- 
ing director. ^ 



CHRYSLER 

[Cont'd from page 28) 

look like they can do more than any 
olher cars on the road." Background 
martial music and a male chorus lend 
a virility mood to the theme. 

• The third phase will retain the 
"can do" theme but will veer off in an 
effort to persuade buyers to see the 
cars at Chrysler dealers and test-drive 
tliem, in order to see just what they 
"can do." 

The last phase of the spot radio cam- 
paign ties in with another major effort 
which will run through all Chrysler's 
air media campaign during the next 
year: that is, Chrysler cars must be 
driven to be appreciated. 

Says Chrysler president L. L. "Tex" 
Colbert: ". . . We are convinced that 
our main selling effort must be direct- 
ed to persuading people to drive and 
ride in our cars. In our advertising 
this year you will notice more atten- 
tion being paid to this theme than ever 
. . . We are going to do everything we 
can to stimulate first-hand driver 
knowledge of our products." 

Corporate ad director Forbes explains 
Chrysler's strategy behind the all-in- 
clusive teaser campaign this way: "We 



were looking for something fresh, new 
and unstereotyped — a new treatment of 
the usual automobile sales problems. 
We have used corporate teaser cam- 
paigns in the past, but never to this 
degree. We think it's going to have a 
big impact." The introductory cam- 
paign was prepared by Leo Burnett, 
Inc., Chrysler's new advertising agencv 
on the corporate and institutional end 
of the account.* 

After the spot radio teaser campaign 
is well underway, Chrysler will come 
in with its net tv special. It will be the 
first major tv appearance of Fred As- 
taire in a one-hour show on NBC TV 
on 17 October (9-10 p.m., EST), car- 
ried on about 175 stations. Astaire will 
introduce his new dancing partner, 
Barrie Chase, and the show will also 
feature the Jonah Jones quartet. If the 
special is as successful as Chrysler 
hopes and expects it will be, the com- 
pany may sponsor another Astaire spe- 
cial early next year. 

•Last February. Burnett was awarded the oorporato 



In the Syracuse Market 

WSYR COVERS 
*80% MORE RADIO HOMES 

Than the No. 2 Station 

This amazing margin of superiority makes 
WSYR unquestionably the most effective and 
economical buy for radio advertisers in a market 
where buying power exceeds $2J4 billion annu- 
ally. 

WSYR attracts the adult, able-to-buy audience 
by maintaining a high standard of quality per- 
formance, by professional performers. In every 
category of programming — news, music, sports, 
drama, variety, farm programs and public ser- 
vice events — WSYR is the leader in the Syra- 
cuse area. 

NBC in Centra/ New York 




5 KW 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



570 KC 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Talk about BUYING POWER... 



^0 Wllion MORE 
iVi9« *^6 ycaf before' 



— that's the forecast for 

just one part of the family groups 

you reach when your products are advertised 

on this most-seen screen 




These are great days for 

the tobacco farmers of eastern 

North CaroHna . . . and for the varied 

industries, tourist businesses, educational institutions and 

other segments of the WRAL-TV coverage zone. 

They will be great days for you, too, if you make good use 
of your selling opportunities on this TOP station, with a con- 
sistently superior rating record in the Raleigh-Durham area 
. . . first in every ARB survey. Get all the facts — fast ! 

4-CAMERA MOBILE UNIT • VIDEOTAPE RECORDER • LARGE NEW STUDIOS 



WRAL-TV 



RALEIGH 
NORTH CAROLINA 

FULL POWER CHANNEL 5 • NBC AND LOCAL COLOR 

Carolina S ^\ Serv/ng ihe area from Greensboro to the coast. 

Colorful \\ from Virginia to the South Carolina line— 

Capital Station ^s^o total of more than 2 million population. 

REPRESENTED BY H-R, INC. 



Chiysier plans to introduce all five 
of its cars on the Astaire special, some- 
thing it has done on Climax! in past 
years. Chrysler dropped Climax!, ex- 
plains corporate ad director Forbes, 
even though they knew it was a good 
show. "We decided to shift into other 
areas, because there is an inherent 
danger in staying with one show or 
one format too long. We've probably 
enjoyed greater success with network 
tv, at least in terms of ratings, than 
most other automobile companies. I 
won't say we will definitely come back 
into network tv with a regular show, 
but it seems a likely possibility by 
early next year. 

"Actually, "Forbes continues, "Chrys- 
ler has put a bigger share of its adver- 
tising budget into air media in past 
years than we will this fall. But we're 
thoroughly sold on both radio and tv. 
From great experience we recognize 
the impact television can deliver. We 
know that tv commercials, properly 
handled, can put prospects in our deal- 
ers' showrooms. 

"And radio gives us the opportuni- 
ty to reach large numbers of people at [ 
the time we want to reach them and in I 
the markets we want to reach them. It i 
is a highly flexible medium, and an 
economical one too." 

One interesting aspect of Chrysler 
Corporation's air strategy is its use of 
a pre-announcement publicity program 
which, in effect, lays the groundwork 
for the radio, tv and print campaigns 
that follow. 

All the auto companies hold press 
previews to give newsmen an advance 
look at the new models, but none of 
them are done on the same scale as 
Chrysler's. Two weeks ago, Chrysler 
flew (from all over the U.S. and 
Canada) some 350 radio, television, 
newspaper and magazine editors to 
Miami Beach where Chrysler had 
taken over the entire Americana Hotel. 
Between Wednesday and Sunday, the 
press : 

• Heard Chrysler president Colbert 
make an optimistic prediction about 
new car sales in 1959. 

• Saw an elaborate stage show, with 
1959 Ply mouths. Dodges, DeSotos, 
Chryslers and Imperials as the stars. 

• Were transported to Hialeah race 
track where 1959 Dodge trucks were '< 
previewed in another elaborate show, i 
and where newsmen drove the '59 ' 
passenger cars. 

• Enjoyed lavish luncheons and I 
dinners, with floor shows, and two j 



20 SKI'TKMBKR 1958 | 



hospitality suites with busy bartenders. 

• Swam in the Americana pool, 
basked on the Florida beach, played 
golf and went deep sea fishing. 

After this big press preview, the 
individual divisions also hold their 
ipun previews in major cities, to catch 
those newsmen who didn't make the 
Florida trip. 

rhe cost to Chrysler Corp. of the 
Florida junket is (by sponsor esti- 
mate I about $.300,000. The big ques- 
tion is why Chrysler does it on such 
a grand scale. The answer is that 
Chrysler believes a massive publicity 
effort can whet the public's appetite 
for its new cars, and thereby increase 
the effectiveness of the advertising cam- 
paigns that follow. One Chrysler ex- 
ecutive puts it this way : 

"Before the big ad campaign starts, 
we want to stimulate public interest in 
our new cars — without actually re- 
vealing what they look like. Our press 
preview accomplishes this very effec- 
tively. And it is geared closely to the 
ad campaign. True, it's expensive to 
do it on this scale, but it's a bargain 
at any price." 

Another interesting phase of Chr> s- 
ler's marketing strategy this fall will 
be what it does with its new foreign 
car, the French Simca. Until it bought 
15% of the Simca stock owned by 
Ford Motor Co., Chrysler was the onl\ 
U.S. auto maker without a foreign car. 
Simca brings Chrysler two advantages : 

1) a chance to share in booming for- 
eign car sales and 2) the use of Sini- 
ca's world-wide dealer network to sell 
Chrysler products. 

Chrysler's ad budget for the Simca 
will probably be about $1 million and 
a good share of this expenditure is 
slated for spot radio and spot tv. 

All Chrysler's air media plans hinge, 
of course, on two factors: 1) Will a 
UAW strike upset the applecart, and 

2) will the public be in a mood to buy 
new cars in a post-recession mood." 

Chrysler president Colbert, for one, 
believes that the public will buy new 
cars and, barring a strike, that the 
auto industry will sell almost 30% 
more cars next year than this year. 

What happens if auto sales jump as 
Colbert predicts? One Chrysler adver- 
tising executive told sponsor that, 
among other things, it would mean 
substantially increased ad budgets for 
every division. "And most of the in- 
crease," he added, "will probably go 
into both radio and television." ^ 



THE PULSE 

{Cont'd from page 32) 
had a number of radio programs play- 
ing in the U.S. and was naturally con- 
cerned with how the American public 
was reacting to them. It may have 
been the acquisition of this client that 
led Roslow later to open a London or- 
ganization; certainly it bore out his 
belief in the qualitative, psychological 
approach to rating measurements. 

"I never dreamed, 16 years ago." 
says Roslow, "that eventually I'd be 
doing what I am now — audience com- 
position, the number of listening fami- 



lies with babies, how many of them 
own stocks and bonds, their reactions 
to tv and radio commercials, audi- 
ence analysis in relation to ownership 
of autos and air conditioning, how- 
many cigarette smokers in a listening 
or viewing family." 

This sort of in-depth portrait of the 
broadcast audience is now going into 
net reports. Next year, all local re- 
ports, both radio and tv, will include 
— along with complete audience com- 
position breakdown — such extra quali- 
tative material. 

The personal approach to research 



Get more for your Money! 



liiit^ 







and 
LICK the BIG 
N.E. Rennsyl\^anJa^ 
Market 

^ y»WILK.ES-BARRE 

GREATEST COVERAGE 

\ N \._ 

# 1st in Average Share of Audience — ALL DAY* , 

# 1st in Average Quarter Hour Rating — ALL DAY* ) 

,-^ ' \ - ' '' ^ • HA.ri_E.TOM \ 



HIGHEST POWER/ 



\-'- 



% Highest power and dominant penetration among 
all competing stations. 



LOWEST COST 



% WILK has the greatest listening audience — You 
get a greater return on every dollar spent. 



BIGGEST GROWTH 



I Effective programming directed to the young and 
old alike is responsible for WILK's rapid growth. 




sponsor • 20 SEPTEMBER 19.58 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

You're in good company when 
you join smart time-buyers who 
select WGN to sell millions of 
dollars worth of goods for top- 
drawer clients. Exciting new 
programming in 1958 makes 
WGN's policy of high quality 
at low cost even more attrac- 
tive to you. 

WGN-RADIO 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



In Fort Wayne 
the nation's No. 1 
test market 
use 



WANE 

Fort Wayne 

CBS RifresenleJ hy l\ny 




A CORINTHIAN STATION 



KOTV Ti.K^ . KGII.T\ 
WANT & WANl -TV loi 
WISH & WISHTV Intli 



is a fetish with Roslow whose first job 
after NYU (where he taught following 
graduation) was with the Department 
of Agriculture tracking New York 
Wo rid Fair visitors about the exhibits, 
clocking the time they spent with each, 
and then asking why. "At The Pulse," 
he explains, "we're not researching 
broadcasting — we're researching peo- 
ple. It's the same as when you ask a 
school teacher what she teaches. She 
may say. 'I teach geography' or 'I 
teach third grade.' This isn't true. 
She's teaching children." 

At the same time, Roslow feels 
strongly about letting people in on 
ratings. "The release of ratings to the 
consumer press by broadcasters is a 
blatant misuse of research data," he 
says. "Such material is neither in- 
tended or designed for consumer con- 
sumption and will only be read out of 
context. The man who first gave rat- 
ings to a columnist should be drummed 
out of the business." 

The two biggest broadcast mile- 
stones that took place since Roslow 
started The Pulse he considers to be: 

(1) The industry acceptance that ra- 
dio and tv were separate media, and 

(2) the awareness of the out-of-home 
audience. Roslow was quick to explore 
the latter. In 1949. he turned out his 
first radio out-of-home study. Auto 
listening has subsequently become a 
regular Pulse project. Tv, which dur- 
ing its earliest years was run right 
in with radio reports, soon got its own 
treatment and by 1952 was being 
measured out of home. Roslow rea- 
soned that in that era most people were 
watching tv at the home of friends, at 
clubs or neighborhood bars. Now 
Roslow predicts a day when tv will be 
measured out of home again thanks to 
thinner picture tubes and wireless 
portable sets. 

Not all of Roslow's looking is to the 
future. A man of intense loyalty (he 
still uses the same printer who printed 
the original Pulse reports), he can be- 
come quite emotional about the "old 
days." His emotional peak each year 
is the annual Pulse luncheon which he 
gives for his clients. It has been noticed 
that immediately after each one, Ros- 
low disappears, sometimes for an hour 
or two. finally turning up again with 
no mention of what he's done or where 
he's been. Only a handful know his 
secret: he must go off by himself to 
"cool out," and think perhaps of the 
long road from Broadway to Fifth 
Avenue. ^ 



KROGER 

{Cont'd from page 37) 
handling of his "specialty." 

How much did this embroidery add 
to the fabric of the promotion? Kro- 
ger, of course, won't say. Flynn does 
admit that he is well pleased with the 
results, and grocery merchandiser Chet 
Lowe adds, "We sold more doughnuts 
in one week than we did in five previ- 
ous weeks." 

No small share of the credit goes to 
the on-location efforts of Kroger. The 
campaign got under way on 25 August. 
That morning the 35 units in the Cleve- 
land area opened with 10-foot banners 
on the store fronts and inside hi-wires, 
devoted to the promotion. 

Besides displays on its own products 
being featured, the store used push- 
cart and end displays for these na- 
tional brands: Carling Black Label 
Beer, Pepsi-Cola, Hellmann's Mayon- 
naise and Chef Boy-Ar-Dee. Shelf 
talkers were tied-in with Sealtest Ice 
Cream. Silver Dust soap powder, Mi- 
lani's 1890 Dressing, Hills Brothers 
Coffee and Durkee margarine. 

The display pieces carried not only 
the promotion slogan, tying in the 
store and station, but were person- 
alized with station personaHty picks. 

In retrospect, the station believes the 
promotion was a major step in grocery 
marketing. "Both we and our national 
grocery advertisers," notes Ed Paul, 
have been finding that the more na- 
tional advertising can be localized the 
more effective it becomes. Some agen- 
cies are now giving us more latitude, 
for example, in their commercial copy, 
letting the station personality use his 
own approach, a la Arthur Godfrey. 
We think this takes it out of the realm 
of the average commercial and gives it 
a distinctive touch." 

Adds Richard M. Klaus, the sta- 
tion's vice-president and general man- 
ager: "This was one of the finest ex- 
amples I know of an advertising cam- 
paign coordinated to such depth. By 
creatively tying the man to the prod- 
uct, on the air and in the store, Kroger 
and WERE achieved a well-rounded 
sales campaign with maximum effect." 

It's safe to say this promotion idea 
will grow. Kroger ad director Flynn 
says he "looks forward to going into 
this promotion again." Adds station 
sales manager Ed Paul: "I know of 
several brokers who have told their 
principals about the promotion. I 
think we'll start getting pretty regular 
schedules for the plan." ^ 



SPONSOR • 20 SEl'TKMBKR 19.58 



YOUR 

FALL -WINTER 

SPOT BUSINESS 

WILL BE 



UP 

because you'll get more of it if you read 
SPONSOR'S new 12th annual 

FALL FACTS BASICS 



38 pages on Marketina; with 15 pages of BASICS charts 
86 pages on Radio with 15 pages of BASICS charts 

78 pages on Television with 18 pages of BASICS charts 
17 pages on Film with four pages of BASICS charts 
Full copies of Fall Facts BASICS available for $1 

Reprints of the popular BASICS charts sections: 



16 pages on Marketing 

16 pages on Radio 

24 pages on Tv and Film 



1 TO 9 
10 TO 49 
50 TO 99 
100 TO 499 
500 TO 999 



35 cents each 
25 cents each 
20 cents each 
15 cents each 
121^4 cents each 



1,000 OR MORE 10 cents each 
Prices include postage 

For fast delivery, use the coupon below: 



Readers' Service, SPONSOR, 40 E. 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Please send me the following reprints from Fall Facts BASICS. 

Check or cash enclosed Bill me 

Section Quantity desired Unit price Total amount 

Marketing „ __ 

Radio _ ._ 

Television-Film _. 

Full copy of Fall Facts BASICS— $1 






Company . 
Address 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

You're in good company when 
you join smart time-buyers who 
select WGX to sell millions of 
dollars worth of goods for top- 
drawer clients. Exciting new 
programming in 1958 makes 
WGN's policy of high quality 
at low cost even more attrac- 
tive to you. 

WGN-RADIO 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



QUAD-CITIES 



now the nation's 



47 



th 



TV MARKET 



according to Television Age Magazine 

▼ RETAIL SALES are above 
the national average. Rock 
Island. Molina, East Moline 
are rated as "preferred 
cities" by Sales Management 
magazine for the first 6 
months of 1958. You too, can 
expect above-average sales if 
you BUY WHBF-TV NOW! 



WHBF-TV 

CBS for EASTERN IOWA 
and WESTERN ILLINOIS 

REPRESENTED BY AVERY KNODEL, INC. 




Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Louis E. Dean has rejoined the stall of 
I). P. Brother & Co. in the capacit) of vice 
])resident. The announcement was made 5 
September by Mr. D. P. Brother, president 
of the national advertising agency which 
A^t^ ^fc^^ hears his name. Mr. Dean has been associ- 

^t^^k 4^^^^^ ^^^'^ ^'^'^ ^^^ advertising and automotive 

^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ fields since 1931. His most recent associa- 
tion has been with the Kudner Agency 
where he was in charge of the General Motors' institutional advertis- 
ing account. He began his career as a radio announcer, and was first 
associated with D. P. Brother as a member of the radio department 
in the 1933's. Mr. Dean will headquarter in the Detroit and New 
York offices of the agency and will reside in Pieasantvijle. \e\\ York. 






M 



Fred Von Hofen was named station man- 
ager of KGW, Portland, Oregon recently 
and has assumed his new duties as of 2 
September. In making the announcement, 
Mr. Otto Brandt, v.p. and general manager 
of the Crown stations, said that Mr. Von 
Hofen is "one of the dynamic young men 
of modern broadcasting." A native of 
Texas, Mr. Von Hofen has been station 

manager of KING. Seattle, and in 19.57 was part-owner and manager 
of KENO. Las Vegas. During World War II, he served with the 
U. S. Marine Corps in the South Pacific combat area. After leaving 
the service in 1944, he went to Seattle/ joining the Crown stations in 
1948 as an announcer on KING. He has been a radio and tv sales- 
man, radio sales manager and station manager with KING previously. 



Robert S. Tyrol has been promoted to gen- 
eral sales manager for WTIC, Hartford, 
Coini., it was recently announced by Mr. 
Paul W. Morency, president of the Travel- 
ers Broadcasting Service Corp. A member 
of the announcing staff of the radio station 
for a number of years, Mr. Tyrol joined 
the WTIC sales department in January of 
19.'>C. In 19,57 he was made assistant gen- 
sales manager. While a member of the announcing staff, Mr. 
Tyrol was identified with many of WITC's audience participation and 
special events broadcasts — both locally and over the NBC and New 
England Regional networks. During World War II, Mr. Tyrol was 
in command of a submarine chaser in the South i'acific. Hr is ;i 
graduate of the ( . S. Coast Guard Aeadenu. lives in Comicrtiml. 




20 ski'TKMb;:k IT); 




*I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, 
and that is the lamp of experience." 

There can never be another station in Tidewater, Va., with 
the length of priceless experience that WTAR can give you. 
For WTAR is the oldest radio station in the nation's oldest 
state. This is one of the reasons why the voice of WTAR is 
the most influential voice in Tidewater*. 



M 



So^'^r. 



'joH'/'fi'da'?(> 



^_ 



F^ ^\ [Z> I O 

790 KILOCYCLES • CBS NETWORK 



President and General Manager— Campbell Arnoux 
Vice President for Sales— Robert M. Lambe 
Vice President for Operations-John Peffer 



j^u^nr/^,... 



*TIDEWTAR is a better way to spell it . . . and sell it- 
the great Norfolk-Newport News market, largest metro 
area population in state, 6th in South, 27th in U. S. 



SPONSOR • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Perspective on the quiz shows 

The immedicite future of the big-money quiz shows is now 
so self-evident that there's little news in the situation trade- 
wise. As after-thoughts, though, these may be worthwhile 
remembering: 

• Fortunately, the industry had figured that the shine was 
off the payout shows long before the headlines did the final 
tarnishing. Of the current crop of network newcomers, only 
two are in the game class (the great majority is action stuff). 
So the danger to the new season isn't much. 

• If history is any indication, it would be folly to write 
off the quizzes categorically. Radio had a similar shock with 
the musical guessing games in the 1930's when those high- 
riding shows were accused of being lotteries — a much more 
serious charge since it involved the government as well as the 
public. Yet guessing the titles of tunes has remained a steady 
programing ingredient over the years. Mental competition 
and showmanship is as old as the human race, so there's a 
continuing demand for games and contests of some sort. 

• If anybody hadn't realized it before, tv's newsworthi- 
nes> is now an iron fact. The quizzes grabbed the headlines 
with easy regularity. While this confirmation of the hold tv 
has on the public is flattering, it's obvious that it can bring its 
frightening moments, too. More than ever, the industry will 
have to behave like a grown-up. 

More program flexibility 

Putting too many program eggs into one i)asket repeatedly 
has been called a drag on creativity and flexibility by 
SPONSOR. The tribulations of the quizzes indicate that it's also 
economically hazardous. 

Thus the argument that new directions are too costly loses 
much of its plausibility. Perhaps a better case for more 
flexibility now can be made to the bookkeepers. 



^S 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Greater creativity in 
all phases of air media tvork. One of our in- 
(lustry\s worst enemies is an obtuse, reactionary 
reliance on statistics at the expense of new 
ideas. Both radio and tv must keep flexible. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Come again? From a Ralston Purina 
Co. news release — "iNIillions of fami- 
lies will be entertained and sold via 
network television's multiple large 
space ads in more than 250 news- 
papers; . . ."■ 

Eerie: A Cedar Rapids mortician has 
turned to television advertising on 
KCRG-TV, will sponsor CNP's telefilm 
series. Danger Is My Business. — More 
deadly than dangerous, we'd say. 
Spelling bee: At the recent A. C. Niel- 
sen Co. press conference in the Wal- 
dorf, Vice President John Churchill un- 
veiled NCS #3, then asked for ques- 
tions from the press. First question 
asked: 'is it true that you've just 
hired a $30.000-a-year vice president 
in charge of seeing that 'Nielsen' gets 
spelled right?" 

Namely: Loretta Kealy, of H-R Reps, 
belongs to the Toastmistress Club of 
New York. The club recently held a 
contest for naming its new monthly 
bulletin; most interesting submission 
of a name: Flickertails. 
Arf: Pat Buttram, CBS Radio star, 
commenting on the small foreign cars: 
"Down home there's a dog that chases 
them. Wouldn't be so bad except when 
he catches them, he buries them." 
New job: From the letter of a job 
applicant received by a Madison Ave- 
nue agency personnel head — "I had in- 
tended to send you a copy of my 
resume earlier this week, and follow it 
up with a phone call; however, I was 
unable to do so. ... I find myself in 
the position of being unable to accept 
any employment at the present time. 

"I've been drafted." 
Chiller: A spot radio campaign in 
N.Y. plugged the new horror movie, 
The Fly, said it was so terrifying that 
anyone who wants to see it alone must 
sign a legal waiver in the lobby. And 
if you arent scared, do you get your 
waiver back? 

Author, author! The upcoming CBS 
TV production of Louisa May Alcott's 
classic, Little Women, has divided the 
producers into two camps over the 
question of whether Beth lives or dies 
at the end. Richard Adler, the show- 
writer, insists she live, while BBDO, 
sponsor Sheaifer Pen Co. and Talent 
Associates wants a sad ending. Adler 
feels there is no time for her to die in 
an hour show with eight minutes out 
for commercials. We'll still bet on the 
sponsor getting his way. 



20 si:i»ti:mbi:r 1958 



THE IMAGE OF 



©nMnwMmiLmrii 




Believable as the familiar school- 
house and the bell that beckons young- 
sters back to books and lessons— that 
is WWJ-TV in Detroit. Eleven years of 
superior television service to southeastern 
Michigan have given WWJ-TV such 
dominant stature that every advertiser 
enjoys a priceless advantage. 
Be sure this fall. Be sure to use WWJ-TV, 
Detroit's Believahility Station. 




i. Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



45 ALWAYS ON 




...all the Great 






.^J*JJ^ 









Announcing a choice selection from 

the Paramount film package. Another 

star in KBET-TV's library of hits 

from AAGM, RKO, United Artists, Republic, 

20th Century-Fox, Columbia, Warner Bros. 



/IflMfleS \\^'a before' . Mo4 
jnanu jnote / 



rfji( 




Call H-R Television, Inc. for Current Avails 



PART TWO I 
OF SPONSOR ^ 
20 September 1958 




IkMERICA'S ONLY 



iO,000 



^ %. 



Watt 



RADIO STATION 



WDIA 



/rs the "Golden Market" of 1,237,686 Negroes 
nearly 1 0% of America's Total Negro Population 



40% of the Memphis Trade Area is Negro 
And Before They Buy, Memphis Negroes Listen 




TO ^nr ii^i^i^ 1070 Kc 

Only 50,000 Watt Station in Memphis 



Cf ALL RATINGS-YOU'LL FIND WDIA CONSISTENTLY "TOPS!" 



i^£mii^^^.:r:m^:iPM: :.^j.vM.i:.o 



7fh ANNUAL 
NEGRO MARKETS 
SUPPLEMENT 

A round up of facts 
and figifres on Negro 
radio, including basic 
market data, station 
and advertiser lists and 
three timely articles 



Negro Market: 
Expanding in 
two directions 

Page 3 



The Advertisers: 
How they get a 
plus from radio 

Page 6 



Negro Stations: 
Their heart is 
the disk jockey 

Page 8 



1 



V 



i 



A* 



^ 



America's most experienced negro radio stations 
ROLLINS BROADCASTING, INC. .*^- 

. ufDcc rhiraan »r<ia . KATZ. st. louis • WGEE, 



DO YOU 
KNOW... 

The Central California Ne- 
gro Market is not concen- 
trated . . . but extends over 
a seven county area, border- 
ing San Francisco Bay! 

KWBR 

COVERS THE 

ENTIRE 

NEGRO MARKET OF 
CENTRAL CALIFORNrA! 




Represented By: 

WALKER.RAWALT, INC. 

EAST 

DORA-CLAYTON, INC. 

ATLANTA 

HARLAN G. OAKES 

WEST 



KWBR 

WARNER BROTHERS 

327 -22nd STREET 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

1,000 WATTS 

24 HOURS A DAY 

1310 KC 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP — Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMlllin 



Senior Editor 

W. F. Mlksch 

Associate Editor 

Russ Carpenter 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Western Editor (Los Angeles 

Pete Rankin 

Film Editor 

Beth Drexler Brod 

Assistant Editors 

Jack Lindrup 

Gloria Florowitz 



Art Editor 

Maury Kuriz 
Production Editor 

Editorial Assistant 



Vikki ■ 



iskniskki 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Advertising Promotion Manager 

VP — Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 
Production Manager 



Georqe Becker 
Jessie Ritter 
Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 

Emily Cutillo 

Harry B. Fleischman 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 

Laura Datre 

Readers' Service 



HTCT 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

Tibined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
ion and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 



Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. Murray Hill 8-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 
2nd class matter on 29 January 1948 at the Balti- 
more postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

©1958 Sponsor Publications Inc. 




^VLIB-fiist New York static 
broadcasting Negro community 
news and special events on a legu- 
laaly scheduled basis-evei y hour on 
the half hour 

>VLIB-only New York station 
devoting 87% of its broadcast time 
to Negro programming. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Sell... 


AriccaMaBC 


SI 


^^^^^ 


■ ■«^ 


^3 


g 


Li-t-l'le Rock 


^PH<»ylff&' 


Li 



Sell... 


^Kmiisiiclikitf' 


1^?^ 


Wkm 


V^V 


■P-^ 


> ^ 




Shr^m#e|>or-|- 


mM»ri««'t. 




WOKJ 



The NATION'S HIGHEST Hooper- 
rated Negro station • In Jackson 
_ 48 
sister 

nor • The ONLY way to the 
107,000 Negroe 
n Ar 



KOKY 

Arkansas' ONLY Negro station 



The ONLY v 

»s of the Little 
Metropolitan Ar« 



KOKA 

The Ark-La-Tex ONLY Negro sta- 
on • In Shreveport - the 89th 
i-arket - 39% Negro • Top 
toper-rated consistently • Tl 

ONLY way to the 108,000 Negro . 

of the . Shreveport Metropolitan 



WENN 

Alabama's ONLY folltime 100% 
legro station • In Birmingham 
- the 31st market - 42% Negro 

• Top-rated Negro station con- 



y to the 260,000 Negr 
inghai 




SPONSOR'S SEVENTH 
ANNUAL NEGRO ISSUE 



THE 

NEGRO 
MARKET is getting 
bigger in two directions 



^ Non-white population has increased 20% since 1 950, 
half again faster than the rate for the white population 
^ With his spending power tripled since before the war, 
the Negro now has $16 billion to buy the goods he wants 

By Alfred J. Jaffe, Special Projects Editor 



■ i has often been said that there is 
no such thing as a Negro market but 
only a series of markets — say, like 
children under 12 — of which Negroes 
are a part. 

After all (so the argument goes), 
if you advertise to children under 12. 
or families who make less than $5,000 
a > ear, or people who live in New Eng- 



land, you don't look at skin color. 

The argument has a logical ring and 
the additional merit of wrapping itself 
in laudable sociological tones. 

Facts have a way of brusquely push- 
ing logical niceties aside, however, and 
the facts that support the existence of 
a Negro market are tough to ignore. 

They include: (1) the Negro is 



group conscious, (2) he can be reached 
by specialized media, (3) he can be 
found concentrated in certain areas, 
(4) his economic opportunities are 
(still) limited, (5) he does have cer- 
tain likes and dislikes not shared by 
others. 

Finally, marketing facts about the 
Negro are becoming outdated at a 
faster rate than among whites. 

Most important: the Negro market 
is expanding in two directions. Negro 
population and households are growing 
at a speedier clip than the rest of the 
country. So is Negro per capita income. 

While the white population went up 
12.67f from 1950 to 1957, non-white 
persons (of practically all of whom are 



Growing Negro I 



Below, George Hudsor 



W N]R. \euarh-\en- York , 

1 39 .5 



n:n 



Negro I went up 18.9' r. The increase 
ill \ounji non-whites was particularly 
marked. Last year there were about 
'■^r>' ( more Negroes under 18 tlian there 
were in 1950. The corresponding figure 
for whites was 26' < . As a result of the 
prolific Negro birth rate, fully 21% of 
the non-white population is under 10 
\ears of age compared to 21' r for 

The total non-white population is 
P.nv over 19 million. With about 95' r 
of these Negroes (other non-white in- 
clude Japanese. Chinese, Indians, etc.). 
this puts the total Negro population at 
more than 18 million, a 3 million jump 
over 1950. 

A more striking comparison between 
white and non-white reveals this: the 
percentage of non-white households 
has been increasing faster during the 
5()'s than the population. The reverse 
is true among whites — a result of the 
(lip in the number of young people of 
marriageable age. 

While the number of young Negro 
;>(lults in 1957 was only slightly above 
that recorded in the 1950 census, pow- 
erful economic forces have been at 



work. As a result of the rising Negro 
standard of living, where there used 
to be one household there are now two. 
In other words, undoubling. The young 
Negro adult, hankering for a home of 
his own, is now able to afford it. And 
the housing shortage is not as bad as 
it used to be. 

Some statistics to back this up: In 
1947. 15 '> of Negro married couples 
did not have their own household. Bv 
1956. the figure had come down to 7%. 

The rise in Negro well-being is truly 
astounding. Per capita income has 
practically tripled since before the war. 
In terms of constant 1956 dollars (that 
is. with the purchasing power of the 
dollar held constant). Fortune maga- 
zine estimated in 1956 that per capita 
income before taxes had risen to $1,070 
that year from $384 before the war. 
Comparable white income rose from 
$1,250 to $2,000. 

With per capita income of $1,000, 
and taking taxes into account, the 
spendable income of the Negro is thus 
about $16 billion annually. 

While the Negro has a way to go 
before catching up with whites in the 



U. S., his income (Communist paper-, 
please copy) compares favorably willi 
Western Europeans. Fortune estimated 
the average Negro is better off in |iur- 
chasing power than the relativeh pro- 
perous West German (a fact that will. 
no doubt, surprise many), is right on 
the heels of the average Briton and is 
not too far behind the Canadian. 

On the other hand it must be con- 
ceded that Negro is still not rolling in 
wealth. About four out of five families 
have take-home pay of $4,000 or less. 
This is a ratio roughly twice that of 
white families. At the top of the hea|) 
is the 4'^ of non-white families wlio 
make $7,500 or more. The Negro 
"middle class" could be said to consist 
of the 15*^/ whose spendable income 
falls within the $4,000-$7,500 range. 

The marketing story of the Negro 
would not be complete without taking 
note that the Negro is on the march in 
more ways than one. He has been leav- 
ing the southern farm and settling in 
cities. Though Negro population has 
more than doubled since 1900 there are 
half as many living on the land. The 
actual figure is about 2.7 million. 




oiinffcr" than ithite. "Sunny Jin 

station d.j.'s was in the Mahalia Jack- egg hunt to attract buyers to subdivision. Homestead-Pittsburgh, records inti 

son fiarade before her auditorium concert Promotion sold $29,000 worth of houses playgrounds for sponsor Hires 



The 

Negro 
Market 



One of f'-w \eiiro-otvned stations. WCHB. Inkster-Detroit, is visit- Public service is Negro station's link to 

ed by Mayor Rheinhold of Sebewaing, Mich., during "Mayors' Ex- community. WDIA, Memphis, furnishes the 

change Day," when he presided over Inkster. Mayor Rheingold was equipment to 85 Little League teams. Above, 

accompanied by state, county. Rotary, Kiwanis and C. of C. officials the opener of the 19S8 Little League season 




J 


NON-WHITE 


WHITE 


i 




MALE 


FEMALE 


MALE 


FEMALE 




APR. 1940 


5.4 


6.1 


8.7 


8.8 


n 


APR. 1947 


6.6 


7.2 


9.0 


9.7 




APR. 1950 


6.4 


7.2 


9.3 


10.0 




OCT. 1952 


6.8 


7.4 


10.1 


10.8 




MAR. 1957 


7.3 


8.1 


10.7 


11.3 


' 


INCREASE 1940-57 


1.9 


2.0 


2.0 


2.5 



World War II gave a hefty impetus 
to this flight from the farm but, even 
during the 50's the trek continued. 
Census Bureau figures showed a 26 '^v 
jump in all non- white households from 
1950 to 1956 but the hike in non-white 
urban and rural non-farm households 
came to 35 /f. Negro farm households 
went down about 14%. 

The Negro is still primarily a south- 
erner. More than 11 million colored 
have remained below the Mason-Dixon 
line. Joseph Christian, a Negro market- 
ing consultant who numbers Y&R 
among his clients, says, "You can 
roughly break down the location of the 
Negro something like this: one-sixth 
live on farms in the South, one-half 
live in the South but not on farms, 
one-third live in urban areas outside 
the South." 

The main current of migration, how- 
ever, is clearly northward and if pres- 
ent trends continue it will not take too 
long before most Negroes will be north- 
erners. 

The magnet for thq Negro up north 

is the top metropolitan markets. In a 

[Please turn to page 32) 




Community affi 



nt part ot l\egro station I'rograming. 
lonwn's artnities and public relations at tf RAP. \i 
elt during a I'N celebration at uhich Mrs. Roosevelt i 



1/rs. Lrola 




ISegro affairs in U.S. are of interest to rest of world — and lice lersa. 
Nkrumah accepts tape of his U.S. speeches from W LIB general manager Hai 
Baaka, I., Ghana minister of broadcasting; Clarence Holte. BBDO marketii 



Ghana I'renu, 
•> Souk as kot 



Like whites, Negroes are spending more time at school . . . 

Median years of school completed by persons 25 years and over, 1940-57 



but high school graduates are still a definite minority 

Schooling completed by persons 25 years and over, March 1957 



LESS THAN 8 YEARS AT LEAST 8 YEARS 



AT LEAST 4 
YEARS HIGH 



AT LEAST 4 
YEARS COLLEGE 



^^HITE 



20.1 



MALE 



I W 

[ NON-WHITE 53.5 



41.1 



10.1 



42.4 



16.3 



FEMALE 



WHITE 



17.4 



81.0 



45.1 



6.0 



NON-WHITE 



50.2 



19.3 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



THE 

NEGRO-DIRECTED 
ADVERTISER gets a 

^plus' from Negro radio 



^ He finds, say marketing men, a commercial on ISegro 
radio penetrates because ifs placed in an effective setting 

^ He (dso finds that obvious sympathy for ISegroes will 
pay off in loyalty though ISegro is receptive to new brands 



". . . .An ad in Negro media says. 
'This is meant for you.' If someone 
puts on a contest in which the prize is 
a week spent at some very fancy hotel, 
this is obviously not directed at the 
Negro. . . ." 

". . . .You have to make the Negro 
feel he's included. He appreciates a 
specific effort to reach him. . . ." 

". . . .Negro media have penetration. 
The Negro consumes white media but 
there's a psychological filter at work 
there. The Negro-directed ad or com- 
mercial is in an effective setting. . . ."' 

The three statements above were 
made by three different men all of 
whom specialize in affecting Negro 
attitudes or buying habits. 

Statement No. 1 was made by Jo- 
seph Christian, a marketing consultant 
with his own firm and Y&R among his 
clients. 

Statement No. 2 was made by Wen- 
dell Austin of the Negro relations sec- 
tion of the Esso Standard Oil Co.'s 
public relations department. 

Statement No. 3 was made by Clar- 
ence Holte, head of Negro marketing 
at BBDO. 

All three men are Negroes, which, 
on top of their backgrounds, should 
make them doubly perceptive. 

All three men are saying, in effect. 
that the advertiser gets something extra 
— even essential — when he directs his 
advertising specifically at the Negro. 

This o[)inion is b\ no means uni- 



versally accepted. Hundreds of ad- 
vertisers are satisfied that they are 
reaching Negroes effectively through 
general purpose media. There is no 
question that they are reaching Ne- 
groes. And some are, no doubt, doing 
an effective job, particularly among 
those Negroes in the middle and upper 
strata affected by ideas of prestige and 
seeking some mark of identitv with 
the white world. 

This latter factor is of minor im- 
portance in Negro radio. For this is a 
mass medium, selective only in the 
sense that it pinpoints a large and 
identifiable market segment. The mass 
market advertiser who overlooks Negro 
radio would seem to be missing some 
obvious potential. 

Scores of advertisers, obviously, are 
not missing this potential. (For a cross- 
section of these, see the list starting on 
page 30.) Some, like Royal Crown, 
which makes a hair dressing, sell only 
to the Negro market. Royal Crown is 
no small potatoes; it racks up sales in 
the neighborhood of $10 million an- 
nuallv. 

But most advertisers on Negro radio 
make products destined for all con- 
sumers. A number have found their 
])roduct has a special appeal to Negroes 
and are using Negro radio to capitalize 
on it. Products like lard and evapo- 
rated milk fall in this category. Others 
ha\f found their particular brand has 
I l*leasr turn to page 34 I 




Lucky Strike riuorded commemah jor 
.\e^ro marliet. "The Platters,' who made 
recording, are shown with Hunter Hancock, 
KPOP, Los Angeles, one of the two white 
d.j.'s on Negro appeal radio in that market 



Awards for commercial presentations are i 
sometimes given by advertisers to spur 

d.j.'s. Manischewitz' Phil Strauss presents j 

an award to Joe Walker of WMBM, Miami j 

Beach, for the excellence of his wine spots • 




SPONSOR M:GR0 issue • 20 SEI'TKMBKK 10; 




specialis 



Negro 

still rar 

into field. Joseph Christian, fi 

mer Seagram ex ecu t. 

had own consulting firm for ovf 

a year, includes Y&R amon 

clients. Clarence Holte is hea 

of ttvo-man Negro marketing d( 

partment at BBDO, which i 

oi\ly big agency employing N< 

groes in that capaci, 

sultants: Les Baile 

lisco: Jesse Lewis, Birmingh, 



Langendorj Bread made consumer sur- 
vey of d.j.'s in San Francisco before pick- 
ing Rockin Lucky on KSAN. Client tested 
jocks by checking into effectiveness of sell- 
ing for the local retail accounts in area 





jT! 




^ 


If^ 


^H5 




Alcoholic beverages have higher per 
capita consumption among Negroes than 
among whites. D.j. at WHAT, Philadelphia, 
shows the half-quart and l2-ounce six- 
packs of Budweiser, which buys the station 



Disk J0ckey''s personal approach is key 
factor in selling and merchandising on 
Negro radio. "Doc" Wheeler on WWRL, 
New York, tries his charms on two cus- 
tomers for Limacol, an eau de cologne 



Rising Negro standard ot living leads to 
new businesses, like Ebony Health Studio 
chain advertised over KCOH, Houston. The 

picture hrlow shows the opening of a 

'lunl uu.lio. ro, rred /., remote pukups 



Merchandising crews on Aegro appeal statioi 
team employed by WOV, New }orl.. consists of H 
perience before coming into broadcast, and ( /. to 
show model; Helen Gregoiv, who J.ccp-, ju<\ir(l 
Mar\ Cunningham, a model and traimi' n 



. u, laried fields. The 
II ho had retailing ex- 




SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



F 


',^^%i^ ^^ 


ID?.D ^21 


I 








III Korsair crippled children's picnic. Voices 
were played back on the air the next day 



mntoicil '•tinin, „ffir,- has paid off in 
laituig mil iliciiU and I.eeping the old 
es, WOBS, Jacksonville, reports. One- 
ur sidewalk interview is done here daily 



"Seiiro •'Ports are uniiorlant station tan 
Je.se ( hampion, IfJLU, Birmingham, talks 
to Mgr. Dismukes, Kansas City Monarchs, 
at practice session of the local Black Barons 




D.j.'s arc ujten the renter of promotioi 
Dave Dixon of KATZ, St. Louis, leads 
parade to crown "Miss Glamor Spray" 
promoting this new liquid hair straighter 



Saturation schedule on KNOK, Dallas-Ft. Worth, was bought by Forest Theatre lu jjrumulc 
movies as well as Friday night stage show. Station's ''Mr. Lucky" (Rudy Runnells), talks to 
Faye Adams, star of show. Theatre had done some light advertising, station reports, but 
after saturation schedule, business has been at either double or triple the previous level 



THE 

NEGRO 
STATIONS revolve 
around the disk jockey 



^ He provides commentary on music and on public and 
community affairs as well (not to mention merchandising ) 



I he Negro radio station and the 
Negro consumer market have two pri- 
mary points of contact. 

They meet on the air through the 
d.j. and they meet at the point-of-sale 
through merchandising men (and the 
d.j., tool. 

This, in itself, does not riualify Ne- 



gro radio for any blue ribbons. What 
makes the difference, however, is that 
the listener is listening to and the re- 
tailer is talking to a man or woman 
whose skin color is the same as his. 

One should add to this that stations 
also contact their market at a less 
business-like level — the level of com- 



munity affairs, public service and, in 
some cases, agitation for civil rights. 

The d.j. is involved here as well. He 
is a narrator of public aflairs on the 
air. a speaker on public affairs in an 
auditorium, and, in general, a sympa- 
thizer on public issues. To the Negro, 
he is often "one of us." 

The d.j., to sum it up, is the heart 
of Negro radio. 

Most disk jockeys are colored and, 
all things being equal, there is more 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUl': 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Sports stars have strong appeal among 
the Negro audiences, often make popular 
d.j.'s. Above is "Big'' Don Barksdale ot 
KWBR. Oakland, Ohmpic basketball star 




A lOlal oi -12/)09 postcards were sent in 
to, ih- -tainilr minister-' contest on KOKY, 
Lull,- Ko.L ///,. Winner of the contest, 
hrl,l in hhnian. aas the Rev. Felix Evans 



KMi 






I I 

I I 

' I < 
I I 



Dance for young Negroes is gi 



Saturday morning by WAVG, Augusta, using 
city center. D.j. Mai Cook, above, gives 
door prize, got city citation lor dances 




noted in a broadcast from Chicago's Tivoli 
Theatre with W'BEE station personalities 



identification on the part of the listener 
with a Negro than with a white. How- 
ever, some white d.j.'s are exceptionally 
popular and well accepted by the Ne- 
gro community. 

As one Negro broadcaster put it, 
"Negroes either like you or reject you. 
There are no mediocrities in Negro 
radio." 

Many Negro radio personalities are 
colorful with names to match. They 
call themselves the Rev. Gatemouth 
Moore, Sir Walter Raleigh, Gospel 
Boy, Dogface, Lord Fauntleroy. This 
kind of tag is more likely to be found 
in the South. On the whole, the north- 
ern Negro radio personality is more 
dignified, one reason being the more 
"emancipated" northern Negroes are 
beginning to feel the more extreme 
fonvis of clowning hurt the race by 
perpetuating group stereotypes. 

Is Negro radio then segregated ra- 
dio? Some general appeal broadcast- 
ers with large Negro audiences say it 
is. The Negroes themselves don't feel 



this way, however. The more articu- 
late Negroes make the point that dial 
tuning represents a democratic option 
with the listener stopping at whatever 
frequency he wants to — not the fre- 
quency he's forced to. In addition, Ne- 
gro radio is the only place he can get 
broadcast news about his community. 

The further point is also made that, 
just as Negroes listen to general ap- 
peal radio, so do non-Negroes tune in 
on Negro-appeal radio. In some areas, 
for example, Spanish-speaking audi- 
ences find Negro programing to their 
liking. And, while the radio jive fans 
among the general run of Americans 
have never been counted accurately, 
there are undoubtedly a fair fraction 
of them who listen to Negro appeal 
stations. 

These non-Negro audiences listen to 
the music, not to thei personality. The 
Negro-appeal d.j. has a specific target 
for his patter. He talks the language 
of his audience. This doesn't mean the 
d.j. flaunts the differences between 



white and Negro. It does mean he 
creates an atmosphere in which the 
Negro feels at home. 

He doesn't have to be a Negro to do 
this. Hunter Hancock of KPOP, Los 
Angeles, is white and has been pro- 
graming for Negroes for 10 years. His 
audiences include Mexicans and, with 
the advent of rock 'n' roll, other whites 
also. Hancock plays only music re- 
corded by Negroes, stays away from 
"popular jazz" or "prettied up Negro 
music." 

Here are five tips from Hancock on 
programing for and selling the Negro: 

1. Don't talk down. This applies to 
both white and Negro d.j.'s. (Los An- 
geles now has two white d.j.'s in its 
Negro appeal programing. KGFJ's John 
Magnus joined the ranks when his sta- 
tion went to 100% Negro appeal pro- 
graming recently.) Negroes don't re- 
sent white d.j.'s but they are sensitive 
to condescending language. 

2. Don't be "way out." Negroes like 

{Please turn to page 37) 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 







NNOUNCES 





. . .THE APPOINTMENT 
of HAROLD F. WALKER 

as Vice President and National 
Sales IVIanager of the Rounsaville 
Negro programmed radio proper- 
ties. 

Mr. Walker will join the Rounsaville 
chain on November 1st, and will 
have immediate supervision of na- 
tional spot sales for all Negro 
properties. 

He is a 20-year radio veteran, more 
than nine of which have been spent 
withWDIA, Memphis, a pioneer in 
the development of the all-Negro 
programmed pattern. 



AND... 



. . .THE APPOINTMENT 
of JOHN FULTON 

as Vice President and Local Sales 
Manager for all Rounsaville Radio 
properties. 

Mr. Fulton entered radio in 1935, 
and joined the Rounsaville organi- 
zation in 1953. He is a past director of 
N.A.B., as well as past president of 
the Georgia Association of Broad- 
casters. 



ROUNSAVILLE RADIO 



WCIN 



Cincinnati, Ohio. 1000 W. 1480 KC. 
Cincinnati's only all Negro pro- 
grammed station. 

WLOU 

Louisville, Kentucky. 5000 W, 1350 
KC. Louisville's only all Negro 
programmed station. 

WMBM' 

Miami Beach, Florida. 1000 W, 800 
KC. South Florida's most powerful 
all Negro programmed station. 

WVOL 

Nashville, Tennessee. 1000 W, 
1470 KC. Nashville's only all Negro 
programmed station. 

WTMP 

Tampa, Florida. 5000 W, 1150 KC. 
Tampa-St. Petersburg's only all 
Negro programmed station. 

WYLD 

New Orleans, La. 1000 W, 600 KC. 
New Orleans' all Negro program- 
med station. 



HOME OFFICE: 3165 Mathieson Drive, N.E. 
Atlanta 5, Georgia 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NEGRO 

MARKETING 
BASICS 



Ml 



Negro population is growing at a faster rate than white during 1950's . 



The high Negro birth rate during 
the 1950's is dramatized in these 
Census Bureau figures taken from 
the census of 1950 and a sample sur- 
vey last year. Non-white includes 
Indians, Japanese, Chinese, etc., but 
about 95% of non-white are Negroes 



Changes 


IIIIIIIII 
in 


white and 


non-white population, 

WHITE 


1950-1957 

NON-WHITE 


All ages _ 






+ 12.6% 


+ 18.9% 








1 Under 18 






+26.0 


+34.5 


■ 18-24 






— 5.8 


+ 3.8 








25-44 






+ 3.6 


+ 5.6 








45-64 - . 






+ 12.4 


+ 17.5 








65 and over 

|i|:illllillii;il!li!l!iiiil'i!!l'IIIMI!'lllll!llllllllll!liiilii;ii 


IIIIIIIII 




+20.8 


+22.6 



Negroes tend to be ''younger" than whites . 



Percent U. S. poulation in age groups, 

1 WHITE 

Male Female 


by sex an 

NON 


d color 1 

-WHITE ■ 
Female g 


Under 5 


11.1% 


10.5% 


14.5% 


13.8% 


5-9 


10.5 


9.9 


13.3 


12.6 


10-14 


8.9 


8.4 


9.8 


9.3 


15-19 


7.0 


6.6 


8.1 


7.8 


20-24 


6.3 


6.1 


7.1 


7.0 


25-29 


6.7 


6.6 


6.8 


7.1 


30-34 


7.1 


7.3 


6.7 


7.3 


35-39 


7.0 


7.1 


6.2 


6.6 


40-44 


6.6 


6.8 


5.8 


6.3 


45-49 


6.2 


6.3 


5.4 


5.6 


50-54 


5.4 


5.5 


4.6 


4.6 


55-59 


4.7 


4.9 


3.8 


3.7 


60-64 


4.1 


4.3 


2.8 


2.8 


65-69 


3.2 


3.5 


2.0 


2.0 


70-74 


2.4 


2.8 


1.4 


1.4 


' 75-79 


1.5 


1.9 


1.0 


1.1 


80-84 


0.7 


1.0 


0.5 


0.5 


85 and over 


0.4 


0.6 


0.4 


0.5 


Total (000) 


75,688 


76,776 

iiiiiiiliiiliiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


9,170 

lllillllilllllllillililllilllliillliill 


9,595 



These Census Bureau figures cover the total 
U.S. population, including armed forces over- 
seas, as of 1 July 1957. Note high propor- 
tions of children under 10 among both white 
and non-white. Note also that there are about 
5% more females among non-whites compared 
to about 1% in white group. For an explana- 
tion of non-whiles, see caption at top left 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NEGRO 

MARKETING 
BASICS 



Big postwar jump in Negro urban households is due primarily to . . . 



A. Decrease i 

doubled-up 

families 



Percent U.S. married 

1956 


couples w 

1950 


thout own household 

1947 


1940 


" 1 


WHITK :uy, 


:->.*)', 






7.9', 


6.4' , 




NON-WHITE 7.1 


13.8 






15.1 


11.3 




Average number o 

1956 


persons per 

1950 


U.S. 


household 

1940 


1930 


3 


WHITE 3.33 


3.46 






3.75 


4.09 


1 


: NONWHIll 3 95 


4 17 






4 09 


4 27 




= 


1 1 



B. The move 
away from the 
farm 



Percent 


change in numlier of 

ALL HOUSEHOLDS 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
U.S. 


househohls, 

JRBAN & RURAL 
NON-FARM 


1950-56 

RURAL FARM 


1 

1 


WHITE 




+ 10.7', 




+ 14.0', 


-9.5q 




NON-WHITE 




+26.2 




+35.2 


-13.8 


= 




l!llll!l!lllllllllllllllllll 


iiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiii 


Illlllllllllllllll 






1 



Negroes have proportionately fewer husband-and-wife households 



lj||l!i!l!lli!tt!l!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!llll!lll 



Marital status of civilian U. S. population 





I'EKCEXT MARRIED 




PERCENT MARRIED WITH ABSENT SPOUSES 


MALE EEMAEE 


MALE 


FEMALE 


White 

71.1 


\.,i.-white White 

64.1 67.2 


\<.n-uhite 

62.0 


White 

2.4 


N..n-uhite 

7.8 


White 

3.0 


Non-white 

11.3 



I 



All figures on this page are from the Census Bureau. The bottom chart covers U.S. civilians 14 years and over, as of March 1956 
12 SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUK • 20 SKPTEMBER 1958 



NEGRO 

MARKETING 
BASICS 



One out of three working Negro 


women are employed as domestics 




-II II 1 1 1 1 




Major occu 


pations of employed 


persons 






Major occupational group 


Total 


WHITE 
Male 


Female 


Total 


NON-WHITE 
Male 


Female 


Total employed (000) 


58,482 


10,250 


18,232 


6,698 


3,997 


2,701 


Professional, technical 


10.8' 


10.4'a 


11.6% 


3.9% 


3.5% 


4.6% 


Farmers, farm managers 


5.1 


7.2 


0.6 


4.0 


6.2 


0.7 


Other managers, officials, 
proprietors 


11.4 


14.2 


5.3 


2.4 


2.6 


2.1 


Clerical 


15.1 


6.8 


33.2 


.5.6 


4.4 


7.4 


Sales 


6.9 


6.3 


8.2 


1.4 


1.0 


1.9 


Craftsman, foreman 


13.9 


19.8 


1.0 


.5.8 


9.4 


0.4 


Operatives 


17.2 


18.2 


15.2 


19.1 


22.9 


13.5 


Private household workers 


2.0 


0.1 


6.2 


15.5 


0.6 


37.7 


Other service workers 


8.0 


5.7 


13.1 


16.4 


14.4 


19.4 


Farm laborers & foremen 


1.3 


4.0 


5.0 


10.5 


9.8 


11.6 1 


Laborers (except farm and 
mine) 


5.2 


7.3 


0.6 


15.3 


25.3 


0.7 - 



These Census Bureau figur 



' people at work during the week 6-12 July 1958 



Nearly half of all Negro women work 



Eniploynieiit status of civilian population 



Figures at right apply to U.S. civilian 
non-institutional population 14 years and 
over as of 6-12 July 1958. They show that 
while one out of two Negro women are em- 
ployed only one out of three white are 
so engaged. The data also show that the 
percent of unemployed among non-whites 
is double the figure for the white group 



i 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Tot?l 


Male 


Female 


I Percent in 

II labor force 


58.1 


84.0 


35.0 


64.8 


83.8 


48.1 


1 Labor force 


62.706 


43.061 


19.645 


7,767 


4,696 


3,069 


1 Employed in 
^ agriculture 


5.708 


4.667 


1.041 


1,010 


678 


332 1 


g Employed in non- 
M agricultural fobs 


52.773 


35.583 


17.191 


5,688 


3,318 


2,369 1 


1 Unemployed 


4.225 


2.811 


1.413 


1,069 


701 


368 1 


== Percent 

iru„lo I 


6" 


6 5 


7.2 


138 


14 9 


120* 





SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



WE PROUDLY SERVE 

HHILAUbLPHin 

650,000 

NEGRO 

MARKET 




To be the Number One Negro Station in America's third largest city is to be in an envious position. 
We realize this. We also realize that, in order to stay Number One, WDAS must continue to back 
uj) our advertisers with aggi-essive merchandising and programming. 

Some of the Reasojis Why WDAS is a ''MiisV in Philadelphia Radio 

More and more advertisers are aware that to obtain sales dominance in America's large cities is 
vii-tually impossible without the patronage of the Negro Market. In Philadelphia, WDAS exclusively 
delivei-s the ever-growing 650,000 Negro Market. 

The WDAS Negro on-the-air talent team is known throughout the East. They are a highly profes- 
sional group of men and women whose long-time acceptance by the Philadelphia Negro Market is 
unequalled. No one can deliver your message, motivate listeners and gain the acceptance of the 
Philadelphia Negro Market as can the top-rated air-personalities of WDAS. 

Ever since Negro listening has been measured in Philadelphia, WDAS has always been the top- 
rated Negro Pulse station . . . and NOW WDAS HAS MORE NEGRO PULSE QUARTER HOUR 
FIRSTS THAN ALL OTHER STATIONS IN THIS AREA COMBINED. 

Absolutely no other advertising medium in Philadelphia can deliver the specialized Negro Market 
proof-of-performance merchandising available to WDAS advertisers. The WDAS Negro Market 
Merchandising Dei)artment is the first, and only, full-time, fully staffed department in Philadelphia 
offering participations in Food Fail* Stores, Best Markets, Philadelphia Association of Retail 
Druggists and WDAS Spot-lite Superettes. This comprehensive merchandising program ranges from 
])oint-of-i)urcha.se "WDAS APPROVED PRODUCTS" through to finished detail rei)orts. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




There is no more complete list of blue 
chip advertisers in Philadelphia Radio. 

Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer • Humphreys 

Parks Sausage • Black Draught • Creomulsion 

Contadina • San Giorgio • BC Remedy 

Scott's Emulsion • Roma Wine • Dulany Frozen Food: 

Budweiser Beer • Nadinola • United Fruit 

Italian Swiss Colony Wine • SSS Tonic • 666 

Rem . Tastykake • Krey • Sulfur 8 

Snow's Clam Chowder • Tetley Tea 

Washington Flour • Camels • Artra 

Beechnut Baby Food • Booth's Beverages 

Boscul Coffee • Lipton 

Carnation Milk • Coca-Cola 

Blue Cross • Bell Telephone 

Strawbridge & Clothier 

John Wanamaker 

Pennsylvania Saving Fund Society 




Edgley Rd., Phila. 31, Pa. 



National Representatives; 
John E. Pearson & Co. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



NEGRO 

AUDIENCE 
BASICS 



Negro tv saturation in south is less than among whites 

Percent and number of tv households in 12 states 



I ALABAMA 



ARKANSAS 



E FLORIDA 



^ GEORGIA 



LOUISIANA 



MISSISSIPPI 



NORTH CAROLINA 



OKLAHOMA 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



TENNESSEE 



1 TEXAS 



VIRGINIA 



TOTAL 



'. 


number 

(000) 


'c 


number 

(000) 


<. 


number 

(000) 


44.9 


3L5 


58.9 


817 


54.2 


1.132 


35.5 


107 


45.9 


433 


43.4 


540 



52.0 



225 



64.7 



1,391 



62.6 



1,616 



51.7 



69.0 



1,213 



63.8 



1,606 



51.2 



322 



66.0 



930 



61.4 



1,252 



28.4 



199 



38.8 



282 



33.7 



481 



51.5 



385 



64.7 



1,432 



61.4 



1,817 



58.5 



57 



71.9 



1,057 



71.0 



1,114 



47.1 



64.4 



607 



57.8 



53.9 



205 



65.6 



1,351 



63.8 



1,556 



56.8 



394 



68.9 



3,765 



67.5 



4,159 



54.2 



284 



69.3 



1,411 



66.2 



1,695 



48.3 



3,161 



65.1 



14,689 



61.3 



17,850 



llllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllll!lllllllll!lllllllll!l!llllllllllll!lllllllli;!lll!Illil!llllll!lllllllli:^ 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiEiiiiiiiii.KiiiiJiyi: ill; ii:: iiui 



Twicelas many southern Negroes tune radio as tv during average day 



Negro 


adults 


with tv 


Males 






1,532,000 


Females 






1,629,000 


„ii„ 


Illlllllll! 



All data <>" this imnf are based on a 
SindlitiKer & (^o. study taken from August 
195.1 through July 1956. An updated survey 
II ill be released by the firm this fall. The 
figures in the bottom charts are based on 
the same 12 states as the top chart. At 
the right the asterisk indicates that tv per 



\ 


illillllllllllllillllll 


RADIO 

Negro White 


iiiii::i:::i!ii'iiii{iiii!! 

Negro 


iiiiiii 

TV 


lllllllllllllllllllllllll! 
While 


1 


H Percent of population 

1 over 12 who tune 

M at some time during dm 


1 

J 


60.3 


51.9 


32.4 




!.3.1 


J 


H Total time spent with 
3 air media during 

average week {million hou 


1 


64.6 


179.7 


40.6 




181.5 


1 


Per capita time 
spent with air 
media daily (hours)* 


} 

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2:44 

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Ji 



SPONSOR NKGRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



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... of course we'll accept your ET's— but the way our men and women sell you're far better off sending us a 
fact sheet. At WHAT you are never lost in the shuffle— your commercial always gets "personalized sell" from 
every dynamic member of our team. Our job is to sell your product— not merely advertise it. 
That is our only purpose ... we accept the responsibility. Our potency for you in America's third largest 
negro market— 600,000— is further enhanced by . . . 

1. Average actual delivered cost-per-thousand listeners— less than 25c for typical ROS advertisers! 
C/P/M figures based on latest Pulse reports not projected beyond Pulse reporting area. 

2. Comprehensive "custom-designed" in-store merchandising plans. 

3. Total adult programming 24 hours a day. Let us go to work for you 



000 




1. BILL CURTIS 

6 to 10 AM & 5 to 7 PM 

2. LOUISE WILLIAMS-Gospel Tram 
Sunday 6 AM to 12 Noon 

3. MARK HYMAN-News Analyst 
5 shows daily 

4. "BONNIE PRINCE" Charlie Geter 
Sunday 12 Noon to 6 PM 

5. EMORY SAUNDERS 
9 PM to 1 AM 



7. LLOYD "FATMAN" SMITH 

12 Noon to 5 PM 



WHAT. 

PHILADELPHIA 31, PENNSYLVANIA 



Call STARS NATIONAL INC. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



°°|r- 


jomo 


031AJOS 3i|qnd 


° CUICJQ 


1 A43UCA 


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1 


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2^.- 
=-||i. 






NEGRO STATION PROGRAMINC^ 

100% Negro-appeal ""^ ^^'' '"''^' Michigan 

programing 



Tampa . 
Tampa . 



CALL LETTERS 



■WTMP Ir^kst 



GEORGIA 



CALL LETTERS 



Birmingham 

Birmingham _ 

Montgomery -- WRMA 

Tuscaloosa WRBS 

ARKANSAS 

Little Rock KOKY 



^ENN Columbus . 
WILD 



ILLINOIS 

Chicago W BEE St. Louis 

St. Louis 

KENTUCKY 

Louisville WLOV 



MISSISSIPPI 



MISSOURI 

Kansas City KPRS 



KATZ 
KXLW 



NEW JERSEY 

Newark WNJR 



LOUISIANA 



NORTH CAROLINA 



CALIFORNIA 

Los Angeles KGFJ 

San Francisco KSAN ^«""' ^""-"^ ^^^^ 

New Orleans WYLD Durham ffSR!: 

FLORIDA Winston-Salem W'AAA 

Miami WFEC MARYLAND 

Miami Beach WMBM Baltimore WSID OHIO 

*! Pensacola WBOP Baltimore WEBB Cincinnati ^^ WCIN 



1000 WATTS 



CLEAR CHANNEL 



ALL COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 

IS PROUD OF 



ONE OF THE NATION'S HIGHEST RATED NEGRO STATIONS WITH AN 
AVERAGE PULSE WEEKLY NEGRO AUDIENCE OF AN ASTOUNDING 




51% 



♦ 



Yes, PULSE proves you'll get the audience, and you'll get 
exclusive ail-Negro programming from the only 100% all- 
Negro programmed station in the area with all Negro an- 
nouncers! 

. . . and WCLS completely covers this highly valuable 

Columbus Negro market . . . the Nation's 9th heaviest 

major Negro concentration with an official 

35.4% NEGRO 

(Sponsor Publications, Sept. 1956) 



Find out for yourself why WCLS has obtained such greiJ a:ceotanc2 from both 
Southeast: D jra-Cluyioi Agency — Aflanla 
National: V/alker-Rawalf Company — New York, Chicago, Boston, Los Angela:, St 



il and local advertisers i 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



PENNSYLVANIA 50-99% Negro-appeal ceorcia 

CITY CALL LETTERS nrt%&rs*min& city call letters 



Hhilailelphia 
I'hilmlelphiu 



TDAS 

ir irir 



programing 

ALABAMA 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charl.slun Wi'AL Hi 



TENNESSEE 



Chattanooga 

Memphis 



.. r.i/Avs 



_. WDIA 

VIRGINIA 

\orloll. WRAP 

RUhmond WANT Jacksonville 





... WEDR 


CALIFORNIA 

Oakland 


KffBR 


I'asudena — 

FLORIDA 

Jacksonville - 


KALI 

.^...WOBS 



LISTENER LOYALTY plus 

INTENSIVE COVERAGE equals 

SALES POWER 



In the section 
of South Carolina 
with heaviest 
Negro population 
only 2 stations 
con claim 
their loyalty! 

In central South 

Carolina where Negro 

population is 46.5%, WOIC programs 

exclusively to the 384,973 Negroes. 

In the coastal area where the percentage is 56.5, 

WPAL broadcasts the music and features best liked 

by their 414,314 Negro listeners. 

Proof of listener loyalty can be found in any survey of this 

area . . . WOIC and WPAL consistently get high ratings. 

For full sales power in this vast market you need the 

2 Negro stations, WOIC and WPAL. Buy both get 5% discount. 



WOIC 

Columbia, S. C. 
1470 KC 5000 W 

WPAL 

Charleston, S. C. 
730 KC 1000 W 




//-S^ GOLDEN HORN STATIONS 

SPEIDEL-FISHER 

J^Cy BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



" 


WALG 


Dawson 


WDW D 


Macon 


WIBB 


ILLINOIS 


WGES 


MICHIGAN 


..WJLB 


MISSISSIPPI 


WACR 


Meridian 


WQIC 


NEW JERSEY 

Newark 


WHBl 


NEW YORK 

New York ....- 


WLIB 


New York 


WOV 


NORTH CAROLINA 


WGIV 


OHIO 

Cleveland - -- 


.WJMO 


PENNSYLVANIA 

Pittsburgh . : 


If nio 

If (IK 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Greer 


WEAB 


TEXAS 

Tyler 


KDOh 



National Representative: Walker Representation Co., Inc. 
Southeastern Representative: Dora-Clayton Agency 



Less than 50% 

Negro-appeal 

programing 



CITY 


ALABAMA 


CALL LETTER 


Auburn 




JFAVt 


Decatur 




If HO 



SPONSOR NFXRO ISSUE 



• 20 SEPTEMBER 195 



CITY 

Dothan 

Florence — 
Greenville . 

Marion 

Sylacauga 



CALL LETTERS 

ITMSL 

WOOF 

WOIFL 

IFGYV 

IF J AM 

..IFMLS 



ARKANSAS 

Helena KFFA 

Hoi Springs KBLO 

Magnolia KVMA 

CALIFORNIA 

Burbank KBLA 

Los Angeles KPOP 

San Rafael .....KTIM 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington WILM 



iUe 



.WIRA 
.WRHC 
.WTRR 



1 Fort Pierci 
Jack. 

San ford 

i 

I GEORGIA 

j Americas WDEC 

I Baxley .. WHAB 

\ Fitzgerald .__ WBHB 

Fort Valley WFPM 

Gainesville WDUN 

! Griffin WHE 



Hawkinsville . 

La Grange 

La Grange 

Madison 

Valdosta 

Waycross 



..WCEH 
...WLAG 
...WTRP 
...WYTH 
.WGOV 
...WACL 



ILLINOIS 

\Chicago ifAAF 

I Chicago WOP A 

(Chicago flTSBC 



INDIANA 



Gary 

Hammond 



..WGRY 
.WWCA 
..WJOB 



if ^'"'lionapolis jf^Q^i; 

IOWA 

^'' ^^'»«« - KWDM 



Hopkinsville . 
Pineville 



CALL LETTERS 

WKOA 

.....WMLF 



LOUISIANA 



Bogalusa 

Ferriday 

Monroe 

Natchitoches . 
New Orleans .. 
Ruston 



..WIKC 
..KENV 
.....KLIC 
...KNOC 
..WBOK 
. KRUS 



MARYLAND 

Baltimore .....WITH 

Bethesda .....WUST 

MICHIGAN 

Flint _-- WBBC 

Flint ..WMRP 

Saginaw WSG W 

MISSISSIPPI 

Clarksdale ......WROX 

Corinth WCMA 



Greenville .. 
Grenada .. 
Hazlehurst 
Houston ..... 
Oxford ....... 



Philadelphia . 

Picayune 

Starkville 

West Point ... 



WGUM 
...WNAG 
...WMDC 
...WCPC 
...WSUH 
. WHOC 
...WRJW 
...WSSO 
..WROB 



MISSOURI 

St. Louis KSTL 

NEW MEXICO 

Hobbs . KWEW 

NEW YORK 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Burlington — 



Dunn 

Fayetteville . 
Goldsboro ... 
Henderson .... 
High Point . 

Kinston 

Kinston 

Laurinburg .. 



...WCKB 
...WFAI 
..WFMC 
WHVH 
WHPE 
. WELS 
...WFTC 
WE WD 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Birmingham 



NEGRO PROGRAMMING 
HAS MEANT 

■ 1 1 Morning 

Place) Noon 
) Night 
I Pulse 1957 & 1958 

IN RESULTS, TOO! 



(That's why national business has 
increased over 400% in the last 

FONE FORJOE 



HUNTER 
HANCOCK 

THE 

NEGRO 

LISTENING 

HABIT 

IN 

SOUTHERN 
CALIFORNIA 

No. 1 
RATING* 

FOR 

6 
YEARS 

THE POPULAR STATION ' 

5,000 w. 

LOS ANGELES 
BROADCAST TIME SALES 

N.Y. — Chicago — Detroit — 
San Francisco 

DORA-CLAYTON 

Atlanta 



CITY 

Leaksville _ 
New Bern . 
Raleigh . ... 
Southern Pt 

Tyron 

in/, on 

Ifi/son 



CALL LETTERS 

ITLOE 

WHIT 

WRAL 
WEEB 
WTYN 

WGTM 

_ WVOT 



Columbus WVKO 

Dayton WA VI 

Sprin g field _ (fIZE 

Toledo WTOI) 



OKLAHOMA 

Muskogee .KMUS 

Okmulgee KHBG 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Johnstoun If'ARD 

WMCK 



McKeesport 

SOUrH CAROLINA 

Columbia 
Greenville 
Mullins 
Orangeburg 
Rock Hill 



Uni 



wcos 

WESC 
W]AY 
WTND 
WTYC 
.. WBCV 

..JfJZM 
...WKRM 



A t' 


K\ ET 


Beaumont 


KRIC 


Con roe 


KMCO 


Lubbock 


KSEL 


Marshall 


KMHT 


Mid/and 


KJBC 


Nacogdoches 


KSFA 


Pasadena-Housioii 


KIM. 


Te.xarkana 


KTFS 



VIRGINIA 

Daniillr -- IFDVA | 

Harrisonburg ..^ WSVA I 

Petersburg WSSV \ 

Roanoke WROV 

WASHINGTON 

Sralllr KTI I 

WEST VIRGINIA 



Hitch Your 



• 



SALES 

fhe 

STAR 
GROUP 

and make your 



own success story in these 



* 
w 



markets!! 

BOP 



980 KC 



PENSACOLA, FLORIDA 



Phone HEmlock 8-7543 
BRUCE GRESHAM, Mgr. 



RBS* 



* 

w 

500 WATTS 
TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA 

Phone PLaza 2-4581 
JAY GILBERT, Manager 

"Subject to FCC approval 



FIRST- 

Central Savannah River 
Area — Negro Program- 
ming — Successfully Past 
6 Years. 

0]%LV Station — CJ.R.A. 

with 2 Full Time Negro 

Personalities. 

$398,706,000 Negro Retail 
Sales. 123,088 Negro Homes. 

(Source— SRDS consumer service 1958 
— Retma 1958 Fisk Univ. Research cen- 
ter 1958) 

CONTACT OUR 

REPRESENTATIVES FOR 

COMPLETE INFORMATION 




ain Studios— Bon Air Ho 
?ambeau, Vance, Hopple Inc 



Brown Co. Inc 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUK • 20 SKPTKMBER 195 



What product brands 

are preferred by Negroes? 

Brand leaders in 31 different product categories as reported for Negro families in five 
major metropolitan areas (see text at bottom of chart) 



Product 


New York 


Chicago 


St. Louis 


Norfolk 


Indianapolis 


Aspirin 


Bayer 


Bayer 


Anacin/Bufferin 


Bayer 


Bufferin 


Beer 


Ballantine 


Budweiser 


Stag 


Budweiser 


Wiedemann's 


Breakfast food (cold) 


Kellogg's 
Corn Flakes 


Kellogg's 
Corn Flakes 


Kellogg's 
Corn Flakes 


Kellogg's 
Corn Flakes 


Kellogg's 
Corn Flakes 


Breakfast food (cooked) 


Quaker hominy grits 


Quaker Oats 


Quaker Oats 


Mother's Oats 


Quaker Oats 


Cigarettes — men 


Camels 


Pall Mall 


Pall Mall 


Camels 


Camels/Pall Mall 


Cigarettes— women 


Viceroy/Winston 


Viceroy 


Pall Mall 


Viceroy 


Pall Mall 


Instant coffee 


Maxwell House 


Maxwell Honse 


Maxwell House 


Maxwell House 


Maxwell House 


Coffee— regular 


Maxwell House 


Maxwell House 


Old Judge 


Maxwell House 


Maxwell House 


Deodorant — household 


Air-Wick 


Air-Wick 


Air-Wick 


Air-Wick 


Air-Wick 


Deodorant — underarm 


Arrid 


Arrid 


Avon 


Mum 


Avon 


Dog food — prepared 


Ken-L-Ration 


Rival 


Strongheart 


Ken-L-Ration 


Rival 


Hair preparations 


Apex 


Hair Rep 


Hair Rep 


Royal Crown 


Vaseline 


Hand lotion 


Avon 


Avon 


Jergen's 


Jergen's 


Jergen's 


Lipstick 


Avon 


Avon 


Avon 


Avon 


Avon 


Mixes — prepared cake 


Pillsbury 


Pillsbury 


Betty Crocker 


Pillsbury 


Pillsbury 


Orange juice fresh frozen 


Minute Maid 


Snow Crop 


Snow Crop 


Minute Maid 


Birds Eye 


Peanut butter 


Skippy 


Skippy 


Skippy 


Skippy 


Peter Pan 


Remedies — cold relief 


4-Way cold tablets 


4- Way cold tab. 


4-Way 


4-Wav 


4-Way 


Scouring cleanser 


Ajax 


Ajax 


Ajax 


Ajax 


Ajax 




Coconut Oil 


Coconut Oil 


Coconut Oil 


Avon 


Halo 


Shortening 


Crisco 


Crisco 


Crisco 


Crisco 


Crisco 


Soap — laundr> 


Tide 


Tide 


Tide 


Fab 


Tide 


Soap — toilet 


Ivory 


Ivory 


Ivory 


Ivory 


Dove 


Soft drinks** 


Coca Cola 


Pepsi Cola 


Coca Cola 


Coca Cola 


Coca Cola 


Tea 


Lipton 


Lipton 


Lipton 


Lipton 


Lipton 


Tissue— facial, cleansing 


Kleenex 


Kleenex 


Kleenex 


Kleenex 


Kleenex 


Tonics and proprietaries 


Black Draught 


Scotts' Emulsion 


Black Draught 


Black Draught 


Father John's 


Tooth paste 


Colgate 


Colgate 


Colgate 


Colgate 


Colgate 


Vegetables, fruits — fresh frozen 


Birds Eye 


Birds Eye 


Birds Eye 


Birds Eye 


Birds Eye 


Wax— liquid 


Beacon 


Johnson's 


Johnson's 


Aerowax 


Johnson's 



Mogen David Mogen David 



t drinks listed according to the n 



Rollins Broadcasting, Inc., Wilmington, DeL, has prepared "A New Market," a booklet summarizing the buying habits of Negro 

surveyed in the group's five major markets where it operates Negro-appeal radio stations. Rollins estimates Negroes in these areas total almost 

three and one-half million with an annual estimated buying power of more than $'^ billion. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 





WCH B 








Independent Negro 




ll.l 




Henry llu 


T Kd., 




k-iir. Miih. Crcstwood 8-1440. 












•:" 


1,1.111— Dr. Haley Bfll. 








-I'rvs. A: Secy-Dr. Wenilfll F 






I'fo 


rral Manacer— Frank M. Seymo 
cram Direclor— Cieorge E. Whin 


'• 




REPR 


ESENTATIVES 














'^**^,' 


LITIES 

1 ,> : Ml" k,. >l;iys. Dircctiona 


al sunset. 


EST. 


A GEN 


CY COMMISSION 








vn not time only: no cash disc 


cunt. Bills nay- 1 




Mil. 11 rcn.lere.1. Talent and rem 




billed 


T.'m 


r.i.iv Short rate billing if 


requency 




GENE 


TIME RATES 








I'lir ' i' •' hr '1/4 h'r 


3min. 


imin. 




time. 200.00 120.00 80.00 ' 


40.00 






times nPJ..-i0 113.30 77.00 








times 185.00 111.00 74.00 


37:00 


i8:on 




times 177. M Iflfi.^n 71.00 


35.50 










lOO 






32:50 




ii'i" 


i";;:; \]'- ■ '™ 




14:00 

13.00 


'""'" 


"""\.NXi.: •. , ,,M ruw. 


CES 




10 


-n;;;;;;;; ^ y^^ ■ " 


''^ 


"voo 


20 onrHIImlh i- 




ho' no 




SPECIAL FEATURES 


<al Negro 


I 



NATIONAL ADVERTISERS 

These are the leading national advertisers hnying Negro appeal I 
I radio, according to questionnaires received from stations listed I 
I in the Negro station profile section of this issue. 

Stations were asked to list their 10 top national advertisers in I 
terms of dollar billing. Names are grouped alphabetically 
I below, except that, for each letter, the advertisers are listed 
according to the number of times they were mentioned. 

Among the top names are Budweiser, B C Headache Remedy, 
Carnation, Coca-Cola, Camel, Lucky Strike, Pet, Sulfur-S, Wrig- ll 
leys, SSS Tonic, Sinclair Refining, Wonder Bread, Vaseline 



n Tobacco Company, 5 



rican Ace Tea &. Coffe«, I 




Gully GasoliiM. I 



Honey Bee Snuff, 4 

Hamm's Beer, I 
Helme, George Compan 

Hoyt Sullivan, I 
Hunter Fans. I 



Italian Swiss Colfn; 



Kent Cigarettes 
Kool-Ald, I 



Maxwell House Coffee, 3 
Miller's High Life Beer. 2 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 195f 



t Milk. 20 
igsi-Cola. 7 
ibst Brewing Compa 



Robin Hc«d Flour. 



Sinclair Refining Company. 8 
Schlit2 Beer. 7 
666 Cough Syrup, 4 
Stanback Headache Remedy, 4 



666 Cold Tablets. 

Scaly Mattress. I 
Self Rising Flour. 
Sepian Products. I 



I TbtleyTea. 2 

Thorn McAa Shoes. ; 



STILL 
THE 
CHAMP 




IN BALTIMORE ... LET PRO STAR 

BUDDY YOUNG 

"CARRY THE BALL" FOR YOU 



Collegiate gridiron standout . . . 
triple-threat scatback in the pro 
ranks . . . and now, one of Baltimore's 
most popular "chatters" and platter 
spinners — that's Buddy Young! His 
lively commentary on the world at 
large . . . and his astute appraisal of 
things musical have won for him 
(and his sponsors) a host of loyal 
listeners! On or off the football 
field. Buddy Young is a real champ! 
EXCLUSIVE WITH WEBB • BALTIMORE'S 
NO. 1 NEGRO PROGAMMED STATION! 
See 1957 issue of Negro Pulse 



WEBB 



BUDDY'S RACKING UP 
SALES FOR THESE 
AND OTHER STEADY 
WEBB SPONSORS' 

• Ballantine Beer 

• Good Year 

• Lotto Cola 

• Cariing's Beer 

• Sinclair 

• Wrigley's 



5000 WATTS 



ASK STARS-NATIONAL FOR FACTS! 



T 



...AND, HE 

CAN DO THE 

SAME FOR YOU! 






SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



lONLY StATI^M 
fgOGRAMMiNe^ 
iMTTSiUftGMia 




GEORGE \y 

Pins 




WAM6 

PITTSBURGH 860 KC 
FORJOE-NAT'L. REP. 



NEGRO MARKET 

\ Cont'd jroin pa^e 5) 

number of these, the Negro is arrixing 
at the rate of more than l.OOl) per 
month. The figure for Chicago alone 
is estimated at 2i)00 per month. 

A Newsweek magazine survey late 
last year of eight northern cities (in- 
cluding Baltimore and Washington! 
put the. total Negro populaton there at 
3.7 million and estimated that hy 1967 
the figure will be 5 million. Even as- 
suming the Negro population will con- 
tinue its present rate of rise, this would 
mean that fully 23 7f of all Negroes 
would be found in these eight cities. 

Last \ ear's special census for New 
York Cit\ counted 948,000 within the 
cit) limits, more than double the 1940 
figure. WOV, New York, estimates that 
259^ of the Negro population in the 
New York metropolitan area live out- 
side New York City and the adjacent 
New Jersey metropolis' of Newark and 
Jersey City. The station puts the metro 
Negro population at about 1.5 million. 

The Newsweek study found big in- 
creases in the other seven cities, too. 
During the 1940-57 period. Chicago's 
Negro population went up from 277 to 
633 thousand, Los Angeles from 63 to 
254 thousand (with an estimated 800 
thousand by 19671. Philadelphia from 
250 to 462 thousand, Detroit from 149 
to 475 thousand. Baltimore from 165 
to 280 thousand. Washington from 182 
to 375 thousand and St. Louis from 
108 to 225 thousand. 

In moving into his new urban home. 
the Negro tends to congregate with his 
own kind for reasons that are too 
obvious to need spelling out. The result 
is that most Negroes can be found in 
racial pockets in the central city zone. 
Despite his growing wealth, the Negro 
has not been welcomed in the suburbs. 
Christian points out that of all the 
new homes built between 1935 and 
19.50 only \'/( have been purchased b) 
Negroes. 

There are straws in the wind, how- 
e\er. indicating this is beginning to 
change. Speaking of a Negro area that 
has become almost a byword in the 
hmuiiage. WOV sa) s in a market pres- 
erilation: "With rapidly improving 
economic status, Negroes are moving 
out of Harlem . . . (which) has shown 
no perceptible (population) increase 
in the last five years, new Negro resi- 
dents from the south keeping pace with 
the exodus. Today the upper economic 
groups are found in Westchester, St. 



Ali)aiis I Queens I and upper Washing- 
ton Heights. New housing projects 
have mushroomed in Hempstead. Free- 
lK)rt. \\\andanch and Amity ville in 
(suburban I Nassau and Suffolk coun-| 
ties."' 

KWBR. Oakland, speaking of thJ 
San Francisco area, says, "This marker 
differs from many in the east. PopuJ 
lation areas extend from Vallejo to thJ 
north, to San Jose in the south, Oak- 
land, east and San Francisco, west. I^ 
is not concentrated in one area withir 
a city, but it numbers over thirteen 
areas and seven San Francisco Bay 
counties." 

Another factor of marketing impor- 
tance is the increasing educational op- 
portunities of the Negro. The differ- 
ence between the younger and older 
generations in educational attainments 
is strikingly delineated in 1952 Census 
Bureau figures. These showed that, 
while a third of Negroes 65 and over 
were illiterate, the figure for those in 
the 14-24 age group was less than 4%. 
A startling fact pointed out by Fortune 
is that there are more college-educated 
Negroes in the U. S. than there are 
Britons in the United Kingdom. And 
this despite the fact that there are three 
times as many Britons. A recent com- 
parison of white and non-white fami- 
lies disclosed that, while there were no 
adults with some college education in 
86% of non-white families, the cor- 
responding figure for white families — 
72.8 — was not much less. 

Negro enrollment in colleges is in- 
creasing six times as fast as white and 
the number of Negro students in col- 
lege was up from 27,000 in 1930 to 
nearly 200.000 last year. The Negro 
is joining in the general trend toward] 
more schooling among all Americans. 
Between 1940 and 1957 the median 
years of schooling for non-whites in- 
creased two years, only slightly less 
than for whites. 

On the other hand, there are still 
many Negroes who do not have th; 
minimum amount of schooling re 
quired to take advantage of the increas' 
ing economic opportunities being of 
fered. One of two Negroes over 25 hasl 
had less than eight years of schooling 
compared to one out of five white? 
Only about 189^ of the Negroes hav< 
completed four years of high schoo 
and less than 3'/ have finished fou 
years of college. 

The changing picture of Negr 
schooling will inevitabh result in taste' 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 195 



I 

I for new or different kinds of products. 
' But the important thing is that the 
' Negro is a market for most ty})es of 
products right now. 

With the Negro able to afford more. 

the inevitable question about his credit 

standing has come up. There are some 

obvious facts right on the surface to 

' dispel any rash generalizations that the 

Negro is a poor risk. Take the pur- 

j chase of houses and automobiles, which 

; involve the greatest outlays of credit. 

About half of all Negroes own autos 

(three out of four white families do I 

and about one out of three own their 

, own home (about six out of 10 white 

! families do). In some areas, home 

I ownership is substantially higher. Ne- 

i gro consultant Les Bailey estimates that 

I 45% of Negro families in the growing 

j Los Angeles area are home owners. 

Furthermore, Negro home ownership is 

increasing at a much faster rate than 

whites. It has become clear, therefore. 

' that Negro credit is no problem where 

the Negro has the money. 

The answer to questions on Negro 
' credit can be summed up by a state- 
) ment made by William Vogt, commer- 
[ cial manager of WDAS, Philadelphia. 
I following a station study of the sub- 
I ject. He said: "The Negro is no better 
! and no worse a credit risk than anyone 
j else in his income bracket." 

While credit men are a reticent crew. 
I the station managed to elicit a few on- 
i the-record comments in surveying the 
' field. One was from Charles Dicken, 
'secretary of the Philadelphia Charge- 
A-Plate Assn. Dicken declared: "We 
I keep no record of race, but after some 
years as a credit official, I believe I can 
say positively that the Negro is as good 
a credit risk as his income allows him 
to be. In analyzing any credit figures, 
you must first divide them into income 
groups. Having done this, I am certain 
you will find that, say, in the $6,000-a- 
year group the Negro is exactly as 
:ood or bad a credit risk as his white 
ounterpart. This ratio will be main- 
tained up and down the income ladder.'' 
Naturally, in dealing with low in- 
come groups, credit must be advanced 
th care. The owner of a small fur- 
niture store servicing one of Philadel- 
phia's Negro areas told WDAS he 
avoids too many delinquent accounts 
by scaling payments according to in- 
come. 

■'Instead of monthly payments of 
115," he said, "I must charge $10 or 
even $8. In some cases it is more suc- 



cessful to require weekly payments 
since in lower income brackets it is 
easier to spare $1 or a $1.50 a week 
than it is to put together $8 or $10 at 
the end of the month. I have no more 
delinquent accounts than colleagues of 
mine doing business in totally white 
areas." 

As the attention to the Negro market 
increases, so does the demand for Ne- 
gro market data. So far, the supply is 
far below the demand. 

Joseph Wootton, a Negro station rep. 
explains one reason for the paucity of 
material. "Many research studies of a 
broad nature include a small Negro 
sample but it is too small to break out 
separately. Sure, there's a demand for 
information that covers just the Negro 
market but there are not enough people 
willing to spend the money for it." 

Clarence Holte, who heads up Negro 
marketing at BBDO (the only white 
agency that has a Negro marketing 
department) reports that the scarcity 
of material is particularlv obvious on 
the national level. "There's quite a bit 
of material on individual Negro mar- 

s. however," he said. 

Most of the basic material used today 

based on the 1950 census and some 



sample surveys taken by the Census 
Bureau since then. There's actually 
more data around than is being used 
but considerable digging is required 
and many agencies don't have the man- 
power to do the job. 

Because of the scarcity of basic 
data, agencies scan Negro market esti- 
mates with a wary eye. Negro station 
are emerging from the blue-sky era as 
growing business has given them the 
funds to do more research. Growing 
sophistication and the aid of agency- 
wise reps has also helped improve the 
calibre of material. 

Print media have contributed to the 
pool of information also. These include 
not only Negro-appeal periodicals but 
those in areas with a high proportion 
of Negroes. WDIA. Memphis, for ex- 
ample, uses material from a panel 
study done by the Memphis Commer- 
cial Appeal-Press Scimitar. This pro- 
vides data on the volume of grocery 
commodities purchased by both Ne- 
groes and whites and discloses what 
kinds of products are heavily or lightly 
purchased by Negroes. 

The following products, according 
to the survey, enjov heavy purchases 
by Negroes: household ammonia, re- 




Speaks 

the language 

of 2,455,000 

NEGRO 

& PUERTO RICAN 

New Yorkers 



Buy the station that has the ear 
of New York's ever increasing 
Negro and Puerto Rican market. 
41% increase in Negro popula- 
tion gives your client untold sales 
potential. 

You're on the beam with WWRL 
. . . New York's NUMBER 1 
NEGRO and SPANISH STA- 
TION. 



WWRL . . 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



VlfGES 



There are only 10 cities in the 
United States with a total 
population greater than the 
Negro population of Chicago- 
land. 

The Negro population 
of Chicagoland area is 
now more than 850,000. 

The buying power of 
fhis responsive segment 
is more than ^A billion 
dollars. 

WGES is the only full time 
5000-watt Chicago station de- 
voting a major portion of its time 
to broadcasts directed to the Ne- 
gro Market. 

It takes WGES to reach 
the Chicagoland Negro 
Market! 

The Negro personalities who 
broadcast your advertising mes- 
sage are experienced air sales- 
men. 

Richard Stamz 

6:00 AM to 7:00 AM 
12:00 Noon to 1:00 PM 
Monday thru Saturday 

Stan Ricardo 

9:00 AM to 12:00 Noon 
Monday thru Saturday 

Norm Spaulding 

2:00 PM to 3:00 PM 
Monday thru Saturday 

Al Benson 

3:00 PM to 6:00 PM 
Monday thru Saturday 

Sam Evans 

9:30 PM to 11:00 PM 
Monday thru Saturday 

Eddie Plicque 

1 1 :00 PM to 1 2:00 Midnight 
Mondoy thru Saturday 

Sid McCoy 

12:00 Midnight to 1:00 AM 
Monday thru Saturday 

WGES 

5000 Watts 

2708 W. Washington Blvd. 

Chicago 12, Illinois 



frijierated biscuits, bleaches, cooked 
cereals, canned tuna, all-purpose flour, 
lard, canned and powdered milk and 
cream, packaged rice, salad dressing, 
salt, spaghetti and macaroni, laundry 
bar soap, and toilet bar soap. 

A widely-used study on Negro ex- 
penditures is one done by the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania two years ago and 
based on 1950 census material. This 
breaks down the proportion of Negro 
and white income spent in 14 cate- 
gories. A number of stations, such as 
KNOK. Dallas-Fort Worth, use these 
figures, in the absence of other evi- 
dence, to break down local sales among 
Negroes in their areas. 

The U. of P. study provided an 
illuminating picture of the differences 
between Negro and white spending pat- 
terns. For the most part, differences 
were not great. Probably the most 
interesting difference, because of many 
misconceptions regarding the Negro, 
was that regarding auto expenses. 

The study showed that while white 
families spent 12% of their after-tax 
income on auto expenses, Negroes 
spent 7%. Negroes spent a greater 
proportion of their income (but not a 
much greater proportion )on food, 
clothing, alcoholic beverages and to- 
bacco, about the same share on housing 
and household operation and utilities, 
less for recreation and medical care. 
The auto figures from the U. of P. 
study are in line with other material 
cited by Holte indicating that, though 
Negroes make up 10% of the popula- 
tion, they spend between 6 and 7% of 
total money for new and used cars. 
A consumer spending survey by 
KATZ, covering the St. Louis area, dis- 
closed that Negro families concentrate 
their auto purchases on the three low- 
priced cars and roughly in proportion 
to U. S. sales. A considerable number 
purchased Buicks but only a few had 
Cadillacs, an unexpected preference 
for those not familiar with the Negro 
market but one confirmed by other 
authorities. 

Some figures on appliance ownership 
in Birmingham come from WJLD. 
These disclosed that 96% of Negroes 
own refrigerators at present, compared 
with 80% in 1953. Ownership of gas 
or electric cooking ranges rose from 
55% in 1953 to 769^ in 1957. As for 
washing machines, the percent of Ne- 
gro families owning them rose from 
15 in 1948 to 767< in 1957. All in all. 
the Negro is not doing badly. ^ 



NEGRO ADVERTISERS 

{Cont'd from page 6) 

caught on and use the medium to hold 
on to and expand their share of Negro 
consumption. Certain wine and beer 
brands are examples. Still others, such 
as soap and cigarette makers, use about 
every retail outlet they can and thus 
cannot overlook such important market 
segments as the Negro or foreign- 
language consumer. 

Soaps also offer an example of how 
Negroes can be used to expand distri- m 
bution in white households. Negro | 
domestic help sometime wield an iron, I 
if paternal, hand in white household 
and determine the brand of such hous< 
hold products as soap, cleansers, waxe 
and certain types of foods. Often th 
only way to reach these colored womei 
particularly in the South, is throug 
radio. 

Clearly apparent now to most advel 
tisers is the fact that Negroes an 
quality conscious. This is partly a i 
suit of their growing prosperity ani 
the imitative shopping habits that coi^ 
sciously or unconsciously go alon 
with a rise in status. Another facto: 
cited by those wise in the ways 
Negro psychology is the fear amon{ 
Negroes of being cheated. They are 
willing to pay a little more if they feel 
they are buying a reliable product. 

Ironically, this fear is being ex- 
ploited by some manufacturers who 
sell identical products for the white 
and Negro market under different 
brand names but put a higher price tag 
on the Negro-directed product. 

More important, however, is the fac 
that the Negro consumer, more oftei 
than not. prefers the same nationi 
brands as his white counterpart. Thi 
day of the Negro saving a few pennie 
on an off-brand is passing. StroiJj 
evidence of Negro preference for top 
selling national brands can be found i; 
a Rollins Broadcasting study of pK 
ferred brands in the five markets wh( 
it owns a Negro-appeal station. 

In years past. Negro media oftei 
touted the brand loyalty of Negroe 
the idea being that ad dollars spent i 
the Negro market would pav off i 
long-term dividends. You still he; 
such promotion but the sound is mute, 
And with good reason. The flood '[ 
new products that have been intrj 
duced in the past 10 years has four, 
a receptive market among the colore 
There is a type of brand loyal 
among Negroes, however, that remai 



SPONSOR NF.CRO ISSIF. 



20 SEPTEMBFR 19' 



a |Mi\verful factor. This is the loyalty 
tuwaid products whose makers are felt 
to be sympathetic to Negroes. It op- 
erates in a particularly potent way in 
1 cases where the advertiser employs 
I Negroes. 

; "Buy where you can work" has be- 
i come an increasingly effective slogan 
among Negroes. It is one reason why 
I Negro d.j.'s pack such a sales wallop, 
and why Negro media are becoming 
more essential to advertisers out to 
maximize sales. 

The Negro d.j. (and, it should be 

'< pointed out, that white d.j.'s are also 

popular among Negro listeners) is the 

heart of Negro radio advertising. More 

than in general appeal radio, he is a 

■ well-accepted member of the Negro 

i community. 

I Advertisers in the Negro market are 
I sharply aware of this acceptance and 
I much of their buying revolves around 
I them — once the cost is hammered out 
I between station and client. 
j Let's take a look at how some ad- 
vertisers are buying Negro radio: 
Italian Swiss Colonv is a popular 
I wine brand among Negroes. A 12- 
I market survey by Johnson Publishing 
I {Ebony, Jet) showed it in first place in 
I a field of 95 entries with a 15% share 
I of the market — twice the share of its 
i nearest competitor, Gallo. 
j The client, via Honig-Cooper, has 
I been using Negro radio for many years. 
I Radio schedules follow a regular pat- 
tern of 13 weeks in the summer and fall. 
Negro radio is used in 14 markets: New 
I York, Chicago, Detroit. Cleveland, Phil- 
adelphia, Roanoke, Lynchburg, Rich- 
mond, Memphis, Washington, Balti- 
more, Miami, Houston. Dallas-Ft. 
Worth. In the three Virginia markets, 
Memphis and in Baltimore, all radio 
money is put into Negro-appeal sta- 
tions. 

Some buys in the other markets are 
pretty heavy, however. The client re- 
cently bought a package on WDAS, 
Philadelphia, consisting of 100 min- 
utes a week for 52 weeks firm. 

Aside from the cost factor, the 
WDAS buy was decided primarily by 
the lineup of d.j.'s. The jocks on 
WDAS and the other stations as well 
are provided with a fact sheet and an 
e.t. Client and agency prefer the d.j.'s 
to sell the audience in their own style. 
Clarice McCreary, timebuyer on the 
account, reports she usually buys one 
station per market, expects merchandis- 
support. She looks first at the 



;PONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



lOO'f Negro appeal station in a mar- 
ket but will settle on another with a 
smaller percentage of Negro program- 
ing if the personality has a strong fol- 
lowing. 

Another account selling via Negro 
radio is Carnation evaporated milk out 
of EWRR, Los Angeles. Carnation's 
marketing problem: outselling Pet. 

Roland Gallman, media buyer, picks 
stations generally on the following 
basis: 

"Negroes are loyal to certain sta- 
tions; we seek these stations out in 



each market. Negroes are loyal to cer- 
tain d.j.'s. In many cases, they are 
prominent civic figures. We look for 
them, too. 

"The station's standing in the Negro 
coinmunity is important. Some stations 
are outstanding in public service. They 
operate swimming pools, help finance 
summer camps, and so forth. 

"Then there's promotion. By and 
large, Negro stations offer more pro- 
motional tie-ins than the general sta- 
tion, largely because the Negro d.j. 
makes more personal appearances. We 



KCOH 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 




fi>h^ 



HOUSTON NEGRX) 



OCTOBER 17,18,19, 19 58^^^ 

HOUSTON,TEXAS ^^ 



Serving 

and 

SELLING 
32M00 
Negroes 

ill the 

St. Louis area 

since 1947 

KXLW 

the 

St. Louis ^^Blues" 
Station 

See "Stars" National, Inc. 
to buy these fVALfff 
personalities 

A. Dostan 

E. Rodney Jones 

George Johnson 

who have for over 8 years 
sold in our community 

KXLW 1320 kc. 
St. Louis 17, Mo. 

National Rep 

Stars National, Inc. 



look for tins proinolional help from 
stations." 

Carnation's copy line for Negro ra- 
dio does not differ from its general 
copy. However. Gallman said he ex- 
pects the personality reading it to in- 
ject his own personality and may 
change the copy a hit to suit his selling 
manner. 

Gallman buys housewife time — from 
about 9 a.m. to 3 or 4 p.m. "We are 
not interested in traffic times," he said. 
"We don't buy late afternoon times 
when teenagers are the predominant 
audience. We want to reach women at 
home. Late afternoon offers the highest 
ratings on Negro programing; how- 
ever, we'd rather have a lower rating 
earlier in the day." 

Negro program times affect Carna- 
tion's buys, of course. With few Ne- 
gro appeal stations in Los Angeles, 
Gallman had bought 9 p.m. on KGFJ. 
However, when the station switched to 
100% Negro appeal programing re- 
cently, he switched the buy to 1 p.m. 
Another exception is KSAN, San Fran- 
cisco, where Gallman buys early morn- 
ing in addition to late afternoon. 

Carnation prefers spiritual pro- 
graming and will buy it even when it 
gets lower ratings than other types. 
Next in preference is jazz and rhythm 
& blues provided it is not too extreme. 
Agency and client use a rough rule 
of thumb in determining when to use 
Negro radio in a market: a minimum 
of 40,000 Negroes. This is a yard- 
stick applied mainly to southern cities 
and would not hold in a city like Bos- 
ton where the Negro population rep- 
resents a small proportion of the total. 
One of the more careful jobs in 
picking a disk jockey was undertaken 
a few years ago by Langendorf United 
Bakeries, which uses a personality 
named Rockin' Lucky on KSAN. 

Here, in the words of Stanley Col- 
berson, Langendorf ad manager, is 
how it was done via a consumer sur- 
vey: 

"Three factors here were involved: 
First, how did listeners rate each disk 
jockey as to his popularity and how 
often did the person interviewed listen 
to each of the disk jockeys. Second, 
could the various disk jockeys be iden- 
tified with their exclusive advertisers? 
And, third, and most important, how 
much business were the various Negro 
disk jockeys actually sending to their 
local accounts. We know that if a sta- 



tion can sell for a retail account, it is 

The consumer survey done by Lan- 
gendorf illustrates a type of research 
seldom done even in general appeal ra- 
dio. However, this does not indicate 
that data on Negro radio audiences is 
otherwise considered sufficient by ad- 
vertisers. 

Buyers generally agree that so far as 
ratings themselves go, the supply of 
data are adequate in the larger mar- 
kets. There are a considerable number 
of Negro Pulses in circulation. Like 
general appeal radio, the situation is" 
not satisfactory in the smaller marketsi 
where stations are unwilling or unable 
to pay for audience research. 

Aside from ratings, however, there 
is little available on radio audiences^- 
Jesse J. Lewis, president of Jesse J. 
Lewis & Associates, a Negro who headsr 
his own public relations, merchandis- 
ing and broadcast programing firm irt 
Birmingham, said recently: "Many re-j 
ports have been made concerning the 
size of the listening audience. HowJ 
ever, little, if any, research has beei 
made to determine the general char-( 
acteristics of these people." 



All-Market Buy in 

JACKSONVILLE 



I St latest Hooper 

^ General Markef 



1st 



latest Pulse 

Negro Markef 



38% of Jacksonville 
Market is Negro! 



WOBS - 5000 watts 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Larry Picui, Gen. Mgr. 
Gill-Perna, he. Nat. Rep. 
Dora-Clayfon, Sou. Rep. 



SPONSOR NF.GRO ISSUE 



20 SEPTEMBER 1'^ ' 



(Lewis' concern is with more than 
the quantity of data. Like many other 
educated Negroes he feels that there is 
too much emphasis on jazz, blues, 
rhvthm and gospel music "which tend 
to further stereotype the Negro in the 
eves of the public." ) 

Services which measure the general 
radio audience pick up Negro listen- 
ing but it is not broken out separately 
and some station operators question 
whether these services measure the Ne- 
gro radio audience accurately. Al 
Klein, national sales manager of 
WDAS, complained: "We're billing na- 
tional business now at the rate of 
$250,000 a year and we don't even 
show up on Nielsen." 

Here are some tips on using Negro 
radio ratings. 

L In analyzing sets in use remem- 
ber they are affected by the amount 
and time of Negro programing in the 
market. Most Negro appeal stations do 
not devote their full schedule to Negro 
appeal programing. 

2. Traffic times in the early morn- 
ing and late afternoon are a minor 
factor. While Negro auto ownership is 
substantial, driving to work is not as 
common as with whites since most Ne- 
groes tend to live more toward the 
center of town than in the suburbs and 
use public transportation. 

3. Keep in mind that a portion of 
Negro listening, particularly in the 
South, is done in white homes by do- 
mestics. 

4. Keep in mind that certain odd 
times may provide substantial Nenro 
audiences. Sundav morning before 
church, for example, is considered 
good time by some timebuyers. par- 
ticularly those in the market for spir- 
itu>il and gospel music. 

5. Nighttime can also attract good 
audiences on certain occasions since 
some stations, programing to a number 
of audience groups, mav spot Nesro 
programs after dark. A March 1958 
Pulse survey of Negro listening in San 
Francisco was cited by Negro consult- 
ant Les Bailey as evidence for his be- 
lief that Negro radio listening usually 
lasts well into the evening. The Pulse 
survey showed daytime listening gen- 
erally falling in the 25-30 range ( ex- 
cept for early morning). Between 6-8 
p.m., the average was 23; between 8-10 
p.m., it was 20; between 10 and Mid- 
night, it was 17. 

6. Negro radio listening is generally 
higher than white, one reason being 



the smaller tv saturation, an impor- 
tant difference in the South. 

7. Be careful in calculating cost- 
per-1,000 figures. Ratings projections 
can be oil where Negro population 
figures are not up-to-date. And in 
many markets, accurate population fig- 
ures are not available because of 
recent Negro migration either into or 
out of the market. ^ 



NEGRO STATIONS 

{Cont'd from page 9) 

the honest, off-beat music which they 
have made famous. They are not "hip- 
sters." 

3. Let Negroes feel you are working 
tmth them, not working them. Your 
personal contact with them must evince 
real sincerity. 

4. While spiritual programing de- 
livers a smaller audience, it delivers a 
more loyal audience. (Hancock does 
not program spiritual music.) 

5. It is not necessary for an adver- 
tiser to record commercials. (Hancock 
noted, however, that the following 
brands are using or have used record- 
ing or special copy on his show : Coca- 
Cola, Hit Parade. Lucky Strike. Pet 
Milk.) 

If the d.j. is the heart of Negro ra- 
dio, music is the heart of the d.j.'s pro- 
graming. By music is meant jazz, 
rhythm and blues and rock 'n' roll. 
Gospel music is popular but secondary. 

Buyers have noticed an increase in 
the amount of time being given in re- 
cent months to jazz, etc. Some have 
even complained that it is becoming 
hard to find enough gospel music 
shows for their needs. One buyer said. 
"It looks like some Negro stations are 
really going after ratings. There's no 
doubt that Top 40 tunes and rock 'n' 
roll will get big audiences — both Ne- 
gro and white." 

While admitting that rhythm and 
blues have a great appeal, some Negro 
market experts feel it is overdone. 
Here are statements from two of them, 
both Negroes. 

Les Bailey, head of Les Bailey As- 
sociates, a former salesman for KSAN. 
San Francisco, and highly regarded by 
West Coast agency people, said: 

"An effective Negro programed sta- 
tion takes into consideration various 
levels of community life and the di- 
vergent likes and demands of the Ne- 
gro community. Total rhythm and 



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hlues policies may appeal to a certain 
segment or element all or most of the 
time, but they will not attract the larg- 
est possible Negro audience. 

"Social and intellectual evolution 
are constantly in ferment in the Negro 
community. Program directors must 
keep an alert finger on this pulse if 
their audience is to grow in size and 
station loyalty. The strong adherence 
to -R&B' formats by West Coast Negro- 
appeal stations is based in part on the 
'success' stories of media in other sec- 
tions. 

"Pulse surveys are pointed to to 
prove that 'we're on top of the market.' 
But lack of competition and identical 
programing by other Negro-appeal sta- 
tions may be the basis for this 'suc- 
cess.' 

"There is not enough careful screen- 
ing of recordings before they are of- 
fered to air audiences. There are suffi- 
cient rumblings among Negro 'thought 
leaders' regarding 'gut bucket' music 
to warrant concern on the part of pro- 
gram directors. 

"More and more Negroes are daily 
climbing another rung higher on the 
social and economic ladder in the far 
West. They are demanding the type of 



entertainment that goes with better liv- 
ing. Check the record library of these 
new arrivals into the middle class and 
you will find everything from Bach to 
Boogey. As in the case of the 'Rock'n' 
Roll' mills, the 'R&B' factories have 
long since aborted the original music. 

"In the area of religious program- 
ing, trained Negro ministers are rap- 
idly supplanting the barely literate, 
rafter-splitting preachers. The Negro 
may still demand feeling in his spirit- 
ual bill of fare, but he also is seeking 
coherence. A source of deep shame 
and embarrassment is found in some of 
the religious programing carried by a 
number of Negro-appeal stations. 

"Greater attention should be given 
to deliberate community interest pro- 
graming relative to public service." 

In the same vein are comments from 
Jesse J. Lewis, whose Jesse J. Lewis 
Associates handles merchandising, pub- 
lic relations and programing for cli- 
ents aiming at the Southern Negro. 
Lewis completed a survey of Negro 
appeal radio recently and while the 
bulk of the material remains confiden- 
tial for clients, he did say that as a 
result of the survey and his own ex- 
perience he found that Negroes "be- 




WIBB is tops in Negro programming in Macon, with 
1,000 watts and a good signal in all middle (ieorgia towns. It 
originated Negro programming in Macon over nine years ago, 
and has top rated Negro personalities. Latest Negro Pulse, 
July-August 1958, 6 A.M.- 1 2 Noon, 39% 
share of audience; 12 Noon-fi P.M., 40%mm#| M R 
share of audience. WW I ^# ^^ 

Representtd hy Walker Hawnlt Co., Inc., MaCOn, Ca. 

DoraClaylon Agcti(\ 



came closely identified as program par- 
ticipants in the medium just within re-r 
cent years. In almost every major Ne- 
gro consumer market these programs 
have become well established. Negro 
radio is experiencing its greatest 
growth and importance in the South 
Racial segregation might be the 
son for this." 

Lewis admits that devotees to jazz 
blues, rhythm and gospel make up thi 
primary listening audience, but cc 
plains that "because of this misplai 
emphasis on the present type of prol 
graming, there is almost total exclui 
sion of programs which will show that! 
Negroes have other interests." 

Lewis makes clear that "these criti-* 
cisms are the feelings of the more edu- ■ 
cated and advanced members of thd 
race who strongly resent any activity 
which tends to further stereotype thi 
group in the eyes of the public. Recoa 
nizing these criticisms some station opl 
erators have curtailed to a degree thfl 
playing of too many of certain kindi 
of records and the extreme clowninj 
of disk jockeys." 

Most Negro appeal broadcasters wilT 
take issue with the general tenor of 
these comments. They hold that radio 
programing basically reflects the taste 
of the audience in each market and that . 
it must be understood that Negro radio 
is a mass medium and cannot take on | 
the same tone as Negro appeal periodi- 
cals, which are class media (a differ- 
entiation which Lewis himself makes a 
point of) . 

Whether or not it is enough in quan- 
tity to satisfy the more educated Ne- 
gro, there is a substantial amount of 
programing other than music on Ne- 
gro radio. Naturally, the greater per- 
cent of Negro appeal programing a sta- 
tion has, the wider is its variety of 
programing. One buyer told SPONSOR: 
"Jive is not basic to the important 
stations." 

WDIA, Memphis, is one of the most 
highly-respected stations because of its 
community contact and services. Here 
are some examples of what it does: 
(1) sponsors two Negro stage shows a 
year, profits of which (about $30,000 
annually) go to charity, (2) provides 
up to 30 and 40 "goodwill" announce- 
ments per day for club news, funerals, 
lost and found matter and the like, 
(3) furnishes free school bus transpor- 
tation for handicapped children, (4 1 
furnishes uniforms and equipment for 
nearly 1300 Negro boys on 85 WDIA 



SPONSOR NKCRO ISSUK • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Little League baseball teams in Mem- 
phis, Shelby county and Mississippi, 
(5) has pledged $40,000 toward a new 
$180,000 orphanage. In addition, a se- 
ries of expense-paid trips are given to 
winners of a spelling bee, a contest to 
pick the top Negro high school foot- 
ball player in Memphis and a contest 
for amateur talent in the classical, spir- 
itual, popular and rock 'n' roll music 
fields. 

WLIB, New York, is another outlet 
active in airing community affairs. This 
past summer the station put on a se- 
ries of 40 programs, called "Project 
58" reviewing what the station called 
'"the story of New York City's Negro 
families' struggle for respectability." 
Some idea of the frank approach to 
this series is given by a sentence which 
appeared in a release explaining the 
project: "Do you know that responsi- 
ble authorities estimate . . . two out of 
every eight Negro children in New 
York City are born out of wedlock?" 

The station recorded every major 
speech and appearance of Prime Min- 
ister Nkrumah of Ghana while he was 
in America. A dozen 15-minute and 
half-hour programs were devoted to 
his visit. 

A particular sense of how the Negro 
feels and reacts might well be expect- 
ed among Negro owners of Negro ap- 
peal stations, of which there are three 
or four. One of these, Psyche Pate, 
woman owner of KPRS, Kansas City, 
lists the following precautions for pro- 
graming to specialized groups: 

"L We never allude to differences 
that set our audience apart from other 
listeners. 

2. We avoid plays, skits or anec- 
dotes which use members of the group 
in a subservient manner. 

"3. We never use expresions or 
words that are offensive to our special 
audience. 

"4. We never imitate brogue or ac- 
cent. 

"5. We have considered racial or re- 
ligious jokes as being offensive, no 
matter how innocent sounding they 
may be. 

I. On-the-spot interviews, which 
are impromptu, can be dynamite and 
must be performed with great care. We 

oid humorous interviews because of 
the sensitiveness of the market we have 
aptured. 

' 7. Finally, we avoid using racial 
ind reHgious tags on crime stories." 
VIerchandising. Clarence Holte, Ne- 



gro marketing chief at BBDO, makes 
the point that, because Negro market- 
ing areas are compact, Negro stations 
are in a position to provide more mer- 
chandising backing per dollar. Not 
that all stations necessarily provide 
more, Holte said, but they can do it 
when they're so inclined. 

One reason Negro stations will ex- 
tend themselves with merchandising 
support is to attract blue chip accounts 
for reasons of prestige. One source 
familiar with station merchandising es- 
timates that Negro appeal stations nor- 
mally spend 5-10% of the value of the 
purchase on merchandising. 

Al Klein, national sales manager of 
WDAS, Philadelphia, says his station 
is spending in cash .$35,000 for mer- 
chandising. This does not include air 
plugs for retailers with which it has 
tie-ins. The station is currently billing 
national business at the rate of $250,- 
000 per year, a substantial jump from 
the 1956-57 fiscal year, when the figure 
was $85,000. 

WDAS has tie-in arrangements with 
the Food Fair chain, the Best Markets 
chain, a group of independent super- 
markets called WDAS Spot-lite Super- 
ettes and with the Philadelphia Asso- 
ciation of Retail Druggists, which in- 
cludes 600 of the 1,200 indie drug 
stores in Philly, each of which does 
50-100% of his business with Negroes. 

Station merchandising crews are par- 
ticularly effective because many manu- 
facturers do not use Negro personnel 
on a regular basis to do their selling 
and in-store promotion work. Yet, it is 
obvious that a colored store-keeper 
Vv'ill feel more comfortable with some- 
one of his own race. 

This doesn't mean that merchandis- 
ing in Negro stores is any different 
than in white stores. As a matter of 
fact, other than the use of Negro mod- 
els in point-of-sale material, Negro 
merchandising, experts advise, should 
avoid being different because the Ne- 
gro doesn't like the feelings of differ- 
entness. 

Negro station merchandising varies 
tremendously in quality and effective- 
ness, media buyers report. In most 
cases, however, merchandising is only 
a deciding factor in picking a station 
when other things are equal. 

Here is one example of merchandis- 
ing offered by Negro stations. The out- 
let, WHAT, Philadelphia, offers (1) 
the merchandising crew to accompany 
client salesmen at the outset of the 



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SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 20 SEPTEMBER 1958 



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NEGROES 

Top-tated 



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SPECIALIZED NEGRO 
PROGRAMMING 



With 100% Negro programming personnel, 
KPRS is effectively directing the buying 
habits of its vast, faithful audience. Your 
sales message wastes neither time nor money 
in reaching the heart of its "preferred" 
market. Buying time on KPRS is like buying 
jnity of 
128,357 active prospects. 




campaign, (21 setting up of display 
posters in 300 independent retail 
stores. (3) jumbo postcard mailings, 
( 1 1 check of product display and sales, 
(5) d.j.s available for company and 
wholesaler meetings. (61 air tie-in with 
"Feature Stores" as a means of im- 
proving displays, etc. 

Merchandising materials pretty well 
run the gamut on Negro stations. 
Here's what KATZ offers, its cost and 
minimum buy to qualify: (1) 70 cab- 
backs at printing cost only ($150) with 
minimum schedule of 30 minute or 48 
30-second announcements; (2) jumbo 
cards to 250 stores at $25 if art work 
is supplied by client, with 260-time 
minimum contract; (3) 150 inches of 
newspaper ads, free if sponsor sup- 
plies cut, with 260-time contract; (4) 
d.j. photos, at 8 cents each mailed with 
260-time contract; (5) large display 
window at no charge with 156 an- 
nouncements; (6) d.j. apppearances at 
$10 per two-hour appearance; (7) rec- 
ord giveaways at $10 per hundred rec- 
ords if outdated or 60 cents per record 
if a current hit plus mailing and pack- 
aging charge if necessary; (8 1 self- 
liquidating premiums. 

In addition to merchandising crews, 
the d.j., of course, is also a sort of 
merchandising man. The Negro ap- 
peal d.j. does more store calling and 
|)trsonal appearances than his counter- 
part in the general appeal field. 

Tom Sims, assistant to Clarence 
Holte (BBDO's Negro marketing 
chief I. said that in one campaign, a 
Negro d.j. made 250 store calls and 50 
bar calls for the client. 

Another example of station mer- 
chandising is that of WOBS, Jackson- 
ville, which offers the advertiser "mass 
products display" in the Daylight chain 
of supermarkets. Facilities bought 
may be programs, announcements or 
chain breaks. Here's the way the sta- 
tion describes its plan: 

"Once during each week (13- week 
cvcle) on the air, each advertiser is 
eligible for one full week's special dis- 
play in all participating stores. The 
types of display vary according to the 
store. 

"The stores are given free newspaper 
tie-ins. 

"Daylight Supermarket, in requested 
instances, will cut its profit potential, 
while guaranteeing the client his usual 
price." 

The station specifies that the mer- 
chandising given is based on the 



money spent per |)roduct. not for the 
entire company. For example, a soap 
company could not combine its de- 
tergent and shampoo expenditures on 
the station to qualify for merchandis- 
ing aid. However, exceptions are 
granted where products are closely al- 
lied and do not warrant separate ad 
budgets, like club soda and ginger ale. 

WRAP, Norfolk, has a device to 
mobilize its women listeners behind 
station-advertised products. It's called 
the Homemakers Council, which is de- 
scribed as a "voluntary organization 
of 650 Negro housewives representing 
more than 328,000 Negroes in the 
WRAP listening area. Its members 
coordinate the activities of the station, 
the community and the advertiser." 

The Council, the station said, is 
equipped to conduct pantry studies, 
sampling and product demonstrations 
at its regular meetings and in stores 
and homes. Its "bake-off" and "favor- 
ite dish" contests can be used as 
springboards for promotion and pub- 
licity by advertisers. Regular meetings 
of the Council include product dis- 
plays, homemaking demonstrations, 
fashion shows, hair and millinery style 
shows. Members are attracted to meet- 
ings by prizes and refreshments. 

The Council is the brain-child of 
Leola Dyson, director of women's ac- 
tivities and public relations at WRAP. 
She conducts a homemaker show on 
WRAP called Around the Town. 

WOV, New York, uses a merchan- 
dising gimmick called Spin-a-Win to 
create attention and pull customers to 
stores or counters. 

The fonnat: Spin-a-Win is a radio 
quiz (in-store origination) using a 
wheel of chance with 30 numbers. 
Each number on the wheel has a cor- 
responding card with a quiz question 
typed on it. Four of the cards are 
"bonus" cards. If the wheel stops at 
one of these, the contestant gets $2 and 
a chance to answer the question for a 
further prize as well. Questions are 
rated in accordance with their difficul- 
ty; prizes do not run high in this 
game— the range is $2 to $10. And 
consolation prizes are given also. 

Any food or drug advertiser main- 
taining a $197 per week schedule on 
WOV qualifies for Spin-a-Win on the 
following basis: one promotion for 
each consecutive six-week schedule, 
three promotions for a schedule of 13 i 
consecutive weeks firm. The quiz is 
promoted by air announcements and > 
point-of-sale display material. ^ i 



SPONSOR m;gro ISSIK 



20 SKI'TKMBKR 1958 



2m 



:/ 




s^t^B>l (; 



RADIO AND 



I^S SHt 60tS • • • 



No wind too sfrr'ong — no sea too rough for the 
dauntless JEPCO crew. 

Leadership in any field comes only with initiative, 
understanding and hard work. JEPCO represents 
the leading stations in Negro radio. Its position 
in this field has not been won accidentally. 

Smooth sailing and a profitable course can be 
yours too. Call your JEPCO man today! 



JOHN L PEARSON COMPANY 

TELEVISION STATION REPRESENTATIVES 

New York • Chicago • Minneapolis • Dallas • Atlanta • Los Angeles » San Francisco 



'^srkwPl 






Kvf^^ 



iibAN! /^^ 0/2/3/ /«// ////^^ 

5<?;2 Francisco radio station 
serving the u 

tremendous 
Bay Area 
Negro J 

Market ^ •' ■ 
100% of the time! 



"■^A-o, 



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Here's a full house that's hard to beat! 

don't try to improve on a hand like this . . . 
DU Y KSAN and be sure! 

(Proven moit popular year*after-year by Pulse Negro Audience Survey.) 



The KSAN signal goes ^nrhere the Negro listener 
lives, virorks and buys! CField strength surveys show 
260p000 Negro listeners in the KSAN primary Market!) 



For more exciting details, such as rates and avails, contact: 



STARS NATIONAL, INC.: 


JOHN E. PEARSON COMPANY: 


East — 400 Madison Avenue 




New York 17, N. Y. 






Northwest - Des Moines BIdg., Des Moines, Iowa 


Middle West - 35 E. Wacker Drive 


West - 3242 W. 8th Street, Los Angeles 


Chicago 1, Illinois 


58 Sutter Street, San Francisco 




SOR 



E WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



SOAPS WASHING 
OUT PRINT 
FOR MORE AIR 

P&G, Lever, and Col- 
gate, already huge ra- 
dio and tv users, are 
swinging even more 
heavily to air media. 
Big gains seen for both 
spot and network as 
soaps cut back print 

Page 33 



ARB expands 
ArMtron & 1-, 4- 
wk. measurements 

Page 36 

How radio boosted 
music store sales 
to over $1 million 

Page 40 

Agency timebuyers 
use all-media trans 
portathin in Mich. 

Page 42 



fpAPOLIS-ST. PAUL . . . WDGY is first morning 
t afternoon . . . first all-day with a 32.8% average 
(Second station, 19.7%) . First on Pulse, too . . . 
175 of 240 daytime Pulse 14 hours. 50,000 watts 
000 watt personalities. Talk to Blair, or General 
Jack Thayer. 

>NlS CITY . . . WHB is first all-day. Proof: Metro 
Jielsen.Trendex, Hooper; Area Nielsen, 96-county 
Ise. Al'lday averages as high as 48.5%. (Nielsen) 
o: 50.2% of men and women who listen to top 
radio stations listen to WHB. You get coverage 
:, men & women — on WHB. See Blair or General 
r George W. .\rmstrong. 



NEW ORLEANS . . . WTIX is first all day, and 20 times 
more powerful with 5,000 watts on 690 kc. Data: Hooper, 
32.8%. Pulse: First 360 of 360 daytime 14 hours, and 499 
of 504 overall 14 hours. WTIX gives you first call on 
2,500,000 people from Texas to Florida. Talk to Adam 
Young ... or WTIX General Manager Fred Berthelson. 

MIAMI . . . WQAM is first . . . all-day. Proof: Hooper 
(40.5%) ... and first in 264 of 264 quarter hours; Pulse 
... 432 of 432 quarter hours; South & Central Florida 
Area Pulse . . . also Trendex. Next time you're in Miami, 
hear for yourself the sounds that make it so. See Blair . . . 
or General Manager Jack Sandler. 



"r>^-ri<oisi^ 

J)DAY'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLING 

BT • HOME OFFICE: OMAHA. NEBRASKA 



WDGY Minneapolis St. Paul 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR &. CO. 

WHB Kansas City 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 

WTIX New Orleans 

REPRESENTED BY ADAM YOUNG INC. 

WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



I w 



("THE GIANT" MOVES UP TO 
^ m CAESARS HEAD 




3 




CAESARS HEAD". .SPARTanburg 
" ' ^ •GREENVILLE 

(ANDERSON 
\GREENWOOD/i 

GEORGIA \A^^,^OLUMBiA 
AUGUSTA*\ SOUTH 

CAROLINA 



Ask the Station or WEED 

About WFBC-TV's 

"Giant Move Upward" 

Let us tell you the advantages of our 
new Caesars Head Location . . . more 
viewers, better reception, greater domi- 
nance in this great 4-state market in 
the Southeast 

Represented By 
WEED TELEVISION CORP. 



• with Maximum Height 

— 2000 Ft. above Average Terrain 

• with Maximum Power — 100 Kilowatts 

• with Increased Coverage in the 

GREENVILLE-SPARTANBURG- 
ASHEVILLE MARKET 



WFBC-TV has moved Its transmitter atop Caesars Head Moun- 
tain, where a huge 888-ft. tower gives "The Giant of Southern 
Skies" a far greater coverage area ... a greatly expanded 
market for its advertisers ... and better reception to addi- 
tional thousands of viewers in the Station's 4-state coverage 
area. WFBC-TVs service area is increased by 48% in this 
move. The tower at Caesars Head is 3,000 ft. above Green- 
ville and Spartanburg, and 1,000 ft. above Asheville. Height 
above average terrain is now 2,000 ft. (formerly 1,140 ft.). 
WFBC-TV now has Grade-A coverage in Greenville, Spartan- 
burg and Asheville. 



WFBC-TV MARKET DATA 

From New Caesars Head Location 

(within 100 UV/M Contour) 



Population 
Incomes 
Retail Sales 
Television Homes 



2,783,100 

$3,163,844,000 

$2,337,504,000 

523,830 



Channel 4 



WFBC-TV 

Greenville, South Carolina! 
NBC NETWORK 



UidL^iiiUUi 




B 



^ 



wmmm PLAYBILL 



s'O (S**t5' s^-ft-f' <o-<i£- Q^<iS^ s-tij: df^ti-' ^T~«t^ ^^■^fl^ '^^ft^ ^>f^ . 



ij s^ejp s>ct6) SNt^ ®^«j? (B^tiT' (?r<4^j sr-iti:) srti^i 






JACK O'REILLY PAT & JACK RED BENSON 

5:00-9:00 AM 9:00-10:00 AM 10:00 AM -1:00 PM 

Jl (f*tj) (B*(t^ (gStOl ®St^ (§^«!t^ (9*«t5) S^«^ (^^ 



^ 




MAC McGUIRE 

THE 950 CLUB 1:00-3:00 PM 
Sundays 1:00-7:00 PM 




LARRY BROWN 

THE 950 CLUB 3:00-7:00 PM 
Monday thru Saturday 

S^*ftJ) is*«t^ #*(tgj (g*etj) ®^<t^ ®*«tJ5 ®^«^ 5>^^ 



BUD BREES 

7 00 1 1 00 PM 



PLAYING^f 
DAILY ^ 




FRANK FORD ART RAYMOND 

11:00 PM-2:00 AM 2:00-5:00 AM 

io^Jt^ <S^*t3 SN<3 (5^«t^ ©"^fi^ <3^*t>g) (B'^^ 




REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY GILL PERNA. INC. 

New York, ChicaRO, Los Angeles. San Francisco, Boston, Detroit 



27 September 19S8 



Vol. 12, No. 39 



^ SPONSOR 

^^^^ THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/rAOIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

How soap's big three use air media 

33 ^ome old traditions in the use of radio/tv are being questioned by P&G, 
Lever and Colgate. Here's what it means to soap industry, air media 

ARB: diary and automation 

36 fart Two in the series, "Behind the Rating Services" investigates the 
tfcliniques and operation of American Research Bureau in the field of tv 

The timebuyer who struck out 

39 Once upon a time, advertising agencies began to operate like baseball 
teams. No holds were barred when McCann met Burnett in the series 

Where's "Madison Avenue" gone to? 

40 Agency dispersion, as the shops move West to Fifth Avenue and East to 
Park addresses, leaves only one out of four still on Madison Avenue 

Radio builds $1 million sales for music store 

40 Only seven years old. House of Sight & Sound, Los Angeles music retailer 
has annual volume exceeding $1 million. Radio is credited with success 

How to get timebuyers from here — to there 

42 Forty-seven New York and Chicago agency men set new transportation 
pattern. Use planes, buses, boats, carriages in survey of Michigan markets 

Network football's $13 million play 

43 Football's strong male-appeal draws auto, beer, cigarette and oil adver- 
tisers, boots network position to second place among all video sports 

Why Regimen increased spot tv 90% 

44 Drug Research Corp. introduced this weight-reducing tablet into heavy 
competition 18 months ago. Using mainly spot tv, it now leads in sales 

Net tv tally: prices up, dramas down 

45 SPONSOR estimates of average show costs: Prices up for dramas, westerns 
and situation comedy. The compb^te rundown on night net tv costs 

SPONSOR ASKS: What IS the place of the regional 
network in today's radio. 

54 As regional networks play a more important role in ad strategy, a 
station man and two representatives review the regionals' function 



FEATURES 

12 Commercial Commentary 

57 Film-Scope 

2» 49th and Madison 

58 Marketing Week 

«4 xNews & Idea Wrap-Up 

S Newsmaker of the Week 

«4 Picture Wrap-Up 

©O Sponsor Hears 



i^ Sponsor-Scope 

80 Sponsor Speaks 

24 Spot Buys 

SO Ten-Second Spots 

8 Timebuyers at Work 

78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

59 Washington Week 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 
S«cr«tary-Treasur«r 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Exacutive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

Manasins Editor 

Alvin W. Outcalt 

Nows Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Spocial Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editor 

W. F. Miksch 

Associate Editor 

Russ Carpenter 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 



Pete Rankin 
Film Editor 
Beth Drexler Brod 
Assistant Editors 

)ck Lindru 



Glor 



Floro 



Production Editor 

Florence 8. H«msh»r 
Editorial Assistant 

Vikki Vlsknlskki 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 
VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

hierb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meach„m 
Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Asst. 

Administrative Staff 

Dorris Bowers 
George Bee 

Laiir ' 



Datre 
1 Oker 



I Ritter 
Promotion & Research Dept. 

Jane Pinkerton, Manager 
Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 

Emily Cutillo 

Harry B. Flelschman 



^O 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Edifariil, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49Hi St. 
(49th & Madison) nIw York 17, N. Y. TeU- 

SJrt,- ii^l"^ "i" '■""• C"""" 0"'"^ 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-MC3 
Birmingham Office: Town Houn, Birmingham. 
Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 60(7 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-S0S9 
Printing OHice: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11,' 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign |4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E 4>th Sf. 
^- l\ 'Z- ^:«T:,'^""'y "'" «-2772. PuHiili«i 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered at 
2nd class matter on 29 January 194B at the BalN- 
more postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 
©1958 Sponsor Publications Ine 



Station WHO puts the PLUS 
into merchandising! 



The emblem represents WHO Radio's outstand- 
ing "Feature Drugs Merchandising Service" — 
comprehensive plus service offered, at no extra 
cost, to WHO advertisers whose products are 
sold in drug stores. 250 leading stores, accounting 
for 40% of drug volume in 76 of Iowa's 99 



counties, take part in "Feature Drugs" service. 
WHO Radio's "Feature Drugs" service works 
for you in four different ways — and you get 
the whole package when your gross expenditure 
on WHO Radio is S250 per week for 13 weeks, 
or $3250 within a 13-week period of time. 



Each 13 weeks the "Feature 
Drugs" merchandising staff 
encourage 250 high volume 
drug stores to stock your 
WHO-advertised product! 



Each 13 weeks your counter 
displays are placed in 60 
WHO "Feature Drugs' 
stores! 




Each 13 weeks trained 
"Feature Drugs" merchan- 
disers get better display 
space for your products! 



e 



Monthly reports showing 
status of your product in the 
owa market, and competi- 
tive activity! 



who's "Feature Drugs Merchandising Service" is producing BIG RESULTS 
for some of the nation's finest drug manufacturers. It can do the same for 
you. Ask PGW today for more about WHO Radio and "Feature Drugs"! 



Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., National Representatives 



HfMO 

for Iowa PLUS! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 
Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



-^\'^* 



^v1 



I i H y \j 

: I 



I/- 



« 



First flash 
from Arbitron! 

(A CLEAN SWEEP FOR WCBS-TV) 



It's electronic! It's instayitaneous! But the 

results are the same: wcbs-tv is Neiv York's 

number one television station. 

Minute by minute throughout the broadcast 

day, Arbitron, the exciting neiu electronic 

rating service, measures New York viewing 

instantaneously — and Channel 2 piles up 

impressive margins of leadership. 

During the first lueek of continuous operation^ 

Arbitron flashed this report: 

WCBS-TV has the largest share by for of total 

audience vieiving, with a 59 fo lead over the 

second-place station; 

Every single one of wcbs-tv's continuing 

local commercial programs leads all of the 

competition in its time period; 



. w %^W ^% 



I The Early Show leads its nearest station 

competition by 113 7( . . . The Late Show 
leads by 89 "^c ... even The Late Late Show 
has a larger audience at 1 :30 in the morning 
than the average audience of any other 
New York station throughout the daytime; 
The highest-rated news programs — morning, 
afternoon, early evening and late evening 
— are all on wcbs-tv ; 
9 of the top 10 shows are on wcbs-tv. 
The marvel of Arbitron is brand-new, but 
its findings are the same as from the other 
audience measurement services: clear-cut 
leadership for . . . 

Channel 2, New York WC B S ' TV 
CBS Owned • Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 




PORTLAND 

OREGON 



KING SIZED 
AREA 





NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Last week, the newly-formed Independent Television Corp. 
was in the headlines again. The news: ITC had just acquired 
Milton Gordon''s Television Programs of America for $13 
million. The announcement came right on the heels of the 
initial statement of the formation of ITC ami its $10 million 
in production commitments which are already undericay. 

The newsmaker: Fast-paced Jack Wrather, oil man, 
financier, hotel magnate and board chairman of ITC-TPA. His 
nevvlv-formed combine promises to be a leading contender as a top 
film financing, producing and distributing company. 

Wrather's acquisition of TPA gives his already-strong organiza- 
tion an even firmer foothold in the tv film industry. In addition to 
12 TPA properties currently in distribution, including the three 
Wrather productions, Lassie, Lone Ranker and Sgt. Preston of the 
Yukon, ITC takes over a more 
than 300-man staff (says Wrather: 
"I bought the organization as 
well as the properties.") and ac- 
quires five subsidiaries: TPA, 
Ltd.; TPA Films, Ltd.; TPA 
Music Corp.; Normandy Produc- 
tions, Ltd.; and Donall & Harmon 
Advertising Agency. 

ITC, before its new addition, 
was already mustering a good 
(leal of attention in the trade. 
With a staff that includes ex-Ziv 
sales head Walt Kingsley as presi- 
dent, the company had an initial capitalization of S2.5 million as 
well as $10 million in production commitments from Jack Wrather 
Productions and a British producing arm. Associated TV. Each 
will produce two series annually; one of this year's four (Tom 
Swift), is ready for distribution. 

Wrather doesn't plan to stop with ITC-TPA, either. In Las Vegas 
this week, at a semi-annual symposium of all Jack Wrather interests, 
new moves and further acquisitions were already under discussion. 
If Wrather's past record is any indication, he'll keep moving fast. 
His business history goes back to shortly after World War II (he 
served as a Marine) when he returned to Dallas and his family oil 
interests. In 1946, he decided on a motion picture producing career 
and was off to Hollywood to enhance has already considerable 
fortune. 

Wrather jjroduced several moxies. and then, four years ago. went 
into tv production with his three series (Lassie, etc.). Some of his 
other well-diversified interests: ownership of KFMB and KFMB-T^ . 
San Diego, and KERO-TV, Bakersfield, Calif.; three hotels: and 
Muzak Corp. He's also married to Bonila Granville. ^ 

SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 




Jack- If rather 



from the heart of Pittsburgh 
to the entire tri-state area! 



WIIC 




REPRESENTED BY 

BLAIR-TV 



BASIC 

NBC 



WIIC PITTSBURGH 14, PA. 
Telephone: FAirfax 1-8700 twx:PGi6 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



6 9 



^ 



w 



I J became Dopey 
From too much confusion 

Of gimmicked-up sound 
In redundant profusion! 

In these days of high prices and low 
boiling points, a lot of broadcasters 
are relying on all sorts of attention- 
getting devices. Unfortunately most 
of them serve only to distract and 
confuse. 

KHJ Radio, Los Angeles, believes 
that the best attention -getter (and 
attention-holder) is solid, mature pro- 
gramming, designed to specifically 
meet the variety of tastes that make 
up America's 2nd Market. 

Nobody ever built up a loyalty to a 
kazoo or a glockenspiel, but for 36 
years Los Angeles listeners have been 
loyal to KHJ's foreground sound 
and to the personalities on our air. 

Never underestimate the variety of 
tastes in the Greater Los Angeles area. 
Here is a medium programmed to 
satisfy them all. 



KHJ 

RADIO 



LOS ANGELES 

1313 North Vine Street 
Hollywood 28, Califomi£ 





Timebuyers 
'^^m at work 



Kay Ostrander, media supervisor, Anderson-McConneli, Los An- 
geles, feels that there are only five national reps in L.A. who are 
creative, constructive and original in their selling." While Kay has 
identified the five, names are withheld pending notification of 
reps and next of kin through Kay's identification: "The creative 
reps bring in a buyable commodity 
— that is, a suggested schedule 
that's in keeping with the prod- 
uct's character, and provide the 
balance and repetition it needs 
for the available budget. Unlike 
the non-creative, they don't merely 
hand you a printed schedule with 
the avails checked off." Kay says 
the constructive reps follow through 
and even originate from lost busi- 
ness. "When, for example, new 
information becomes available," 
Kay says, "these representatives inform the agencies immediately, 
helping them with new buys and readjustments where necessary." 
The original reps, Kay feels, pool their creativity with the buyer's 
and learn from losing. "From this, it should be easy for most reps 
to identif\ themselves — as one of the five or one of the balance." 



Lynn Diamond, Emil Mogul Co., Inc., New York, reports the prac- 
tice at Emil Mogul of buyers sharing information about markets 
between themselves. "So we will have a great deal of detailed market 
information over and above routine farts on income groups and 
population," Lynn says, "we pool all specific data and information 
available to any one of us. In 

ftimggllffl^^^ particular, we exchange knowledge 

'^j/UJ/f^^K "'^ local customs and habits, 

Wr^ ^aa. weather and seasonal variations, 

times of factory shifts, whether 
or not school stays open when it 
snows, etc. — the kind of informa- 
tion that is learned through first- 
hand experience. In addition, we 
keep each other advised on current 
complications or news in these mar- 
kets." Lynn's work with franchise 
accounts such as Lite Diet Bread 
and Kayco keeps her in constant touch with individual communities. 
As a result the information she gathers is extremely helpful to all 
the buyers and advertisers with the agency, when selecting stations 
and setting up schedules. "The only way," Lynn says, "buyers 
can obtain intimate knowledge of a market is by sharing all data." 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBKR 1958 





• • • and that's not hot air! 

If you want your product sales to ascend in the Baltimore market, consider also: 

ic W-I-T-H gives lowest cost per thousand listeners— by far— of any local station. 
i^ W-I-T-H gives complete, no-waste coverage of the purchasing area that counts, 
■ir W-I-T-H has imaginative programming for the whole family— 24 hours a day. 
i^ W-I-T-H gives powerful merchandising to your product no other station can match. 

Send up your ^^trial balloon"! 

Contact Tom Tinsley, Pres.; R. C. Embry, Vice Pres.; or your nearest W-I-T-H national representative: 

Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington 

Clarke Browne Co. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, Miami, New Orleans 

McGavren-Quinn in Chicago, Detroit and West Coast 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 









^-r^ 






"W^^: 


*' 'vttV*W^' 




-j^ .1 ■•!. .'*3 




1^ 







famous on the local scene . . . 

yet known throughout the nation 



More than any other institution, the local school 
establishes the integrity of its community. Because of 
important contribution, it is recognized 
throughout the land as a symbol of the principles 
of an enlightened society . . . Storer Broadcasting, 
too, has become knr)\v'! nationally for integrity. 
Individual Storer stations' close community 
alliance and 'oyajt / to the principles of 
responsible broadcasting have c-reated this 
.:orporate image. And 
.sales results show 
lliat a Storer Station 
is a r.ocal Station. 




by John E. McMilUn 




the Metro Area 

IN THE TOP 50 OF ALL 
262 METRO AREAS IN 
PERCENTAGE OF 
GROWTH IN 

• POPULATION 

• E.B.I. 

• RETAIL SALES 



the TV Market 

47 COUNTY NIELSEN 
COVERAGE AREA 

POPULATION 1,095,200 

FAMILIES 268,300 

TOTAL RETAIL SALES 736,664,000 

FOOD STORE SALES 201,960,000 

GEN. MERCHANDISE SALES 86,418,000 
APPAREL STORES SALES 43,313,000 
FURN. HOUSE APPLIANCES 

40,228,000 
AUTOMOTIVE DEALER STORE 

155,451,000 
CAS SERVICE STATION 72,523.000 
DRUG STORE SALES 24,150,000 

EATING & DRINKING 29,170,000 

BLDG. MTS. & HDWE. 48,755,000 

TOTAL NET E.B.I. 1,256,409,000 

Coverage from NCS #3—1958 
Market Data from Sales Management 
Survey of Buying Power — May 10, 1958. 



the Station 




Survey after survey 
proves complete dom- 
inance of this rich, 



CUuaijJIWRBL-TV 

[ COLUMBUS GEORGIA | 

CALL HOLLINCBERY CO. 



I 




Commercial 
commentary 

Copy platforms for radio and tv 

From time to time, here at sponsor, \ve've 
l;een asked by agencies and advertisers, "How 
do you set up 'copy platforms' or 'copy check 
lists' for radio and tv commercials?" 

Most of these questions arise, I suspect, be- 
cause the air media are a lot younger than print, 
and radio and tv men are still a little awed by the 
"over-all" copy planning of their print brethren. 

In a way this is a good thing. It's healthy for radio and tv crea- 
tive people to want more system and organization in their work. 
But. on the other hand, there's no need for them to repeat all the 
foolish, flapdoodling mistakes which print has made. 

For instance, 25 years ago when I was breaking in as a print 
copywriter with the old Blackman agency, we had to type out our 
copy on "blue editing sheets." A left-hand column on these bilious 
blue forms carried a series of questions, printed in 6-point type. "I? 
this copy interesting? Compelling? Written from the buyer's view- 
point? Cover all main arguments? Contain an urge to buy?" 

The hapless editor or copy chief was expected to ponder these 
queries like a meticulous Boy Scoutmaster — "Is he trustworthy? 
Loyal? Helpful?" — before giving his weighty O.K. 

But in practice, of course, nobody ever paid the slightest attention 
to this bureaucratic chicanery, and it finally died the death it deserved. 

Similarly with most copy platforms. They're conceived in a burst 
of earnestness and soul-searching, but, after a brief period of en- 
forced popularity, they tend to be regarded as silly, needless paper 
work, delegated to the traffic control of some flat-headed but round- 
bottomed assistant who makes everyone's life miserable by insistinjz 
that they be filled out regardless. 

Check list must be practical 

Copy platforms, and to a lesser extent copy check lists, can be 
enormously helpful and valuable, if properly put together. But the 
first thing to remember is — they ought to be planned as practical, 
workable business tools for the guidance of creative people. 

They're not worth a damn if they're merely the plaything of some 
literal-minded, systems-conscious account executive. Or the brain- 
child of some pedagogical office Moses, who wants to rewrite the Ten 
Commandments of Advertising on tablets of mimeo paper. 

Agencies differ widely in their approach, but the best copy plat- 
forms I've ever seen (for all media, including radio and tv) were 
simple, one-page statements, written down before creative work 
began, and containing succinct explanations of the following: 

1) The sales problem 

2) The sales objective 

3 I Audience to be reached 
4) Basic copy strategy 
.51 Main copy points 
6) Special considerations and cautions 
Of these, the statement of the sales problem is easily 



most 



• 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



to I 




. ..important in the home 



Made by L. C. Smith 85 Corona, one of the 950 manufacturing companies located in the Syracuse area, 
this portable plays an important part in American homes from school age to old age . . . 
Just as WHEN-TV viewing at every age plays an important part in almost every Syracuse home. 
To make your product an important part of Syracuse and Central New York, place it on 
WHEN-TV view. A call to the Katz Agency or WHEN-TV commercial manager, Fred Menzies, 
will put it in the spotlight. 



^r^V^£^^^Tf'^ 



A Meredith Radio & Television Station affiliated with 
Better Homes & Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines. 

KCMO KCMO-TV KPHO KPHO-TV KRMG WOW WOW-TV 

Kansas City Phoenix Tulsa Omaha 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Problem Solved 
by a Timebuyer 




Joes problem was spot cost- 
per-thousand. Too high, said 
the client. 




Take a look, said Blair TV 
Associates, at the WCTV 
market. He looked and 
pondered. 




Joe found 110,.580 homes, 
largely unduplicated, (NCS 

#.3 I 




. . . and married the client's 
daughter and lived wealthily 
ever after. 



WCTV 



North Fla. and South Ga. 

John H. Phipps 
Ilroadcaiting Slalions 



Commercial commentary continued . 



important. Here are a couple of clearly defined sales problems from 
accounts I have worked on in the past: 

The sales problem : to increase the sales of Ivory Soap in the face 
of the fact that Ivory was then used in 70% of all American homes 
(situation as of the middle 30's). 

The sales problem: to build the sale of Heinz condensed soups 
despite tough competition from Campbell which controlled 90% of 
the market and sold for 2< less per can (situation as of 1948). 

Notice that in both cases the sales situation was stated in realistic 
"problem" terms. The commonest reason for weak, muddle-headed 
advertising is that creative people have failed to see the job as a 
problem to be solved or a difficulty to be overcome. 

The sales objective, also, should be stated in down-to-earth lan- 
guage. If you're shooting for a 10% increase in sales or shipments 
(and your account, media, and marketing people have agreed on 
this as a reasonable goal) put it down in black and white. It will help 
to keep your creative feet firmly planted on the ground. 

Audience to be reached is an obvious requirement, so obvious 
that it is often forgotten. Fill in the kind or type of people you'll be 
talking to — housewives, men, dog-owners, kids, homeowners, etc. 

Basic copy strategy is your over-all battle plan, and it's usually the 
most difficult of all items to formulate. Think through how you're 
going to attack the problem, the grand strategy you'll use. In the case 
of Ivor)' Soap, we decided to concentrate on "spreading the use," and 
pushing the large-size cake. With Heinz, we attempted to encourage 
sampling and comparison with Campbell. Both strategies were 
soundly conceived. The Ivory plan worked spectacularly, the Heinz 
less well for a variety of outside, non-advertising reasons. 

Under "Main Copy Points," list briefly all the principal sales you'll 
have at your command. Under "Special Considerations and Cautions," 
put down any significant items such as "half the commercials feature 
the large, half the economy size pack." And, if you want to be frank, 
add such words of wisdom as "Mr. X, president of XYZ Co. doesn't 
know anything about advertising and cares less. But if his refrigera- 
tors don't show up white, white, WHITE in tv and magazines, he'll 
cut you into juicy bits of quivering and protesting flesh." 

Using a Copy Platform 

You'll notice that none of the copy platform items listed above at- 
tempt to define either copy ideas, or creative techniques. This is 
intentional. The purpose of a copy platform is merely to stake out 
the areas in which creative work will be done. 

Think of it as the kind of basic briefing you'd give to an architect 
— "We want a U. S. building at the Brussells Fair. The site looks like 
this. Our appropriation picture is this. And the building will be used 
for these purposes." From that point on it's up to the Ed Stones of 
your organization to dream up the creative concepts. 

Remember, too, that a good copy platform should also serve as a 
statement of principles, and an instrument for agreements with other 
agency departments, and members of the client's organization. See 
to it that account men and ad managers understand and agree with 
your platforms. It will help to keep them on the track. 

Sometimes of course, you'H run into free-sweating, hard-breathing 
extroverts who say "Nuts to all this theorizing. Lemme see the story- 
boards." (or the tape, or the layouts). But even when you're dealing 
with such exasperating problem children, copy platforms can be of 
practical help. Just make certain that you keep them short, simple, 
and easy to understand. ^ 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



I 


1 




KBIG 



w 



Not everyone listens to KBIG. And frankly, we 

rather enjoy this distinction. KBIG is interested 

in reaching only a stable, mature audience... 

and we do! 91% adult listeners (Pulse, Inc.) in 

234 Southern California communities. 

KBIG appeals to a convincible audience with the 

ability to buy your product. 

This is an irresistible value in profitable radio coverage 

at 71% less cost than competitive stations! 



The Refreshing Sound of Radio... 740 kc, 10,000 watts 
JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO., INC. 

6540 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 28, California 



KBI* 



iji^ 



Hollywood 3-3205 



O UTSTAIM DING 

Baseball's World Series, perennially capturing 

the enthusiasm and loyalty of millions of fans, 

is outstanding in the American calendar of sports. 

Equally outstanding in its field is WGAL-TV's 

unique multi-city coverage which costs you less by far 

than single-city coverage. Pioneer Channel 8 

station WGAL-TV is first with viewers in Lancaster, 

Harrisburg, York, as well as in numerous other 

cities including: Gettysburg, Hanover, 

Lebanon, Chambersburg, Carlisle, Lewistown. 

$6 2/3 billion income 

$3 3/4 billion retail sales 

942,661 TV sets 

WGAL-TV 




CHANNEL 8-Lancaster, Pa. 

NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION • Clair McCollough, Pres. 



AMERICA'S lOth TV MARKET 






Hepresenlatn'e: Tt\e MEEKER Company, Inc. • New York . Chicag 




O.NSOR • 27 SEI'TKMBKR 195}} 



J 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 

C«pyrlflht IS58 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Early this year prophets in the advertising trade were predicting that the reces- 
sion wouhl find the durables — particularly those with an institutional intent — on an exo- 
dus from tv. 

The succeeding tables indicate that there was a defect in the crystal balls. Thus: 

Surprise No. 1 of the current tv network selling season has been the way the chemi- 
cal companies have flocked to the medium. 

What makes this flurry doubly interesting is the fact that the message, in most cases, 
is directed to the customers' customers. 

The line-up of network clients from the chemical field includes: 



ADVERTISER 



Olin Mathieson ._. 

Chemstrand 

National Carbon 
Monsanto 
Dow Chemical 
Eastman . 
TOTAL 



estimated expenditure 
(time and talent) 

$5,000,000 

$5,000,000 

2,500,000 

3,500,000 

1,100,000 

400,000 

150,000 

$14,050,000 



Note: Several of the foregoing also are quite active in spot tv. 



Surprise No. 2 is provided by other corporate leaders in the durable goods field — 
outside of automotives — ^who are making healthy expenditures in tv this season: 



advertiser 

Aluminum Co. of America 
General Electric 

Reynolds Metals 

Sperry-Rand 

Westinghouse 

Aluminium, Ltd. 

AT&T .- 

Kaiser Industries 

Libby-Owens-Ford 

U. S. Steel . - 

TOTAL 



estimated expenditure 
(time and talent) 

$2,800,000 

5,800,000 . 

7,500,000 
2,700,000 
11,000,000 
1,000,000 
6,000,000 
4,500,000 
2,000,000 
5,000,000 
$48,300,000 



New national spot radio may not be keeping pace with the buying boom in spot tv, 
but that isn't because of diminishing enthusiasm for the audio medium. 

It just happens that, as one buyer put it, "everybody decided at the same time to 
swing into spot tv." 

Look for this to happen : Increasing demand for major radio daytime and fringe 
time availabilities. 



sponsor • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



Kudio hooii may hv able to Htago a lioiiieriuiiing f»ir a ccmplr of old friends: 
FRIEND NO. ] : (ieneral Mills may return on a major scale for a corporate drive. 
The company has under advisement a radio plan involving daytime which would pro- 
vide a seven-day spread— allowing it to insert whatever products it sees fit for special 
exploitation at a particular time. 



FRIEND NO. 2: If the various product manaj;ers involved can he hrought into agree 
ncnt. Lever Bro.s. also will be riding the corporate horse soon. 

The huy under discussion would give each brand an opportunity to use the radic 
ehicle to stav on for as short or extended a time as it sees fit. 



New business prospects in national spot radio last week included: 

Wheatena (C&W) was asking for minutes in women's shows, and Roma Wine (FCB, 

San Francisco) was placing a six-week saturation campaign. 



Chicago this week took the spotlight as the source of new national spot tv 
business, while New York reps were busy on the availabilities that have poured in on them 
since Labor Day. 

The past week's newcomers from tht Michigan Avenue sector include: 

Ovaltine (Tathum-Laird), in the top 70 markets for 28 weeks, with two different sched- 
ules: late evening minutes and minute participations in children's programs. 

Wilson & Co. (K&E). five-minute personality interviews for 28 weeks, starting 17 
November in about 60 markets. Ground rules: the three five-minute shows are to be stripped 
Monday through Friday at the contiguous rate. Stations are giving this a mixed interpre- 
tation: some are offering the 15-minute rate, and others are figuring at the hourly rate 
]>lus 15 minutes. 

Purex for Dutch Cleanser (E. H. Weiss), a four-week schedule of I.D.'s, starting 3 
November in 17 markets. 



ABC TV's loss in the race for about $1,500,000 worth of Vick business has 
become spot tv's gain. 

Vick was interested in buying into ABC TV's daytime charter plan; but Y&R de- 
murred, arguing that Bristol-Myers, already a member of the plan, had products that were 
competitive with Vick's. 

NBC TV also tried to get a clutch on that Sl.S million but failed. 

The spot plan consists of a schedule of announcements for 26 weeks in 40-50 mar- 
kets. (Vick previously had committed itself for $1 million with the NTA Network.) 



Interest in the creation of stereophonic sound via the use of multiple air facili- 
ties seems to be spreading along Madison Avenue. 

This mav well turn out to be the next big promotional device for selling manufacturers 
of audio appliances on radio campaigns. 

If the stereo concept takes hold, it could go a long ways toward boosting business for 
fm stations. 

In other words, if a client were interested in featuring stereo in his program, he could 
buy not only an am station in the market but arrange to broadcast the show simultaneously 
on an fm station. 

In fact, one of the leading manufacturers in tv and radio is considering intro- 
ducing the new audio line in this fashion late this year. 

What makes the whole trend inviting is tlie public's current kick in stereo music 
and gadgetry. 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 



Weslerns may stir up a lot of noise and arouse the critic s, but nevertheless they 
aren't the No. 1 program type on the tv networks' nighttime schedules this fall. Actual- 
ly, comedy leads the parade. 

The statistics below, compiled by SPONSOR-SCOPE, shows that of the 105 nighttime 
sponsored programs, the western contigent adds up to 18, or 17% of the total, whereas 
comedy shows number 23, or 22% of all programs. 

Here's the breakdown: 



PROGRAM TYPE 


NO. 


PROGRAM TYPE 


NO 


Comedy: Situation 


15 


Audience participation 


12 


Variety 


8 


Documentary — Interview 


5 


Drama : Westerns 


18 


Music: Variety 


8 


Adventure 


11 


Straight 


7 


Mystery 


10 


Sports 


3 


Straight 


8 


TOTAL 


105 



Note: Comedy also is a more or less important ingredient in the eight music- 
variety shows. 

(See Tv Basics, page 45, for an analysis of average program costs for this season.) 

A nighttime network program headed by a personality will get you a 50% bet- 
ter sponsor identification than a western on the average. 

That's the gist of some research just completed at BBDO. 

For the two-sided look, the agency (culling from Trendex) weighed in 16 westerns 
with alternate sponsorship against 18 alternately-sponsored personality shows. 

The average correct sponsor identification for the westerns was 28.0%. The average 
for the personality shows: 55.4%. 

Curiously, the lowest i.d. rater (15.7) among the westerns was Have Gun Will Travel, 
which audience-wise has an unusually high rating. The top i.d. rater in the same field 
was Maverick, with a 43.79f. 

The show with the highest i.d. rating in the personality group was Arthur Godfrey 
(84.2%) and the lowest was the Phil Silver Show (28.7%). 

Incidentally, the average for the personality shows with a single sponsor came out 
at 69.2%, the Dinah Shore Chevy hour leading with an 87.3%. Hitchcock tapped out at 
38.2%. 



Don Coyle has moved up another notch in ABC TV's sales hierarchy. 

He's now v.p. and general sales manager, reporting directly to Bill Mullen, v.p. in 
charge of network sales. Coyle retains authority over sales development and research. 

Slocum (Buzz) Chapin takes over the western division, which comprises Chicago, 
Detroit, and West Coast network sales. 



When an ad agency produces a show i 
heading of news. 

Esty is getting that unique distinction by putting together the film documentary c 
contesting teams which will precede the World Series on NBC TV. 

The costs for time and production of the half hour will come to around $110,000. The 
client: National Carbon. 



owadays, it legitimately comes under the 

1 the 



The tv networks have a hefty problem with daytime, even though the billings 
in that area are booming. 

With the quizzes wearing thin, the networks are faced with the task of doing something 
drastic about their daytime programing schedules. 

You'll hear talk about the need for developing more daytime personality shows; 
but cynical admen retort that the networks have a tendency to give daytime personalities 
short shrift if they don't click immediately. 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE coBtinued . . . 



lake it oil llic testimony of NBC TV's sales deparlnuMit : It ha<l to put up a stiff 
pitch to sell RCA (K&E) on the alternate sponsorship of Northwest Passage. 

The money's coming partially from a budget figured for Life magazine. 



Look for Detroit to pursue a cautious course about cutting loose with new advertis- 
ing money until it sees how the public takes to its 1959 models. 

Opinion among agencies with the Big 3 accounts is that if the early reception turns 
out good, there'll be a flood of auto money after the first of the year for both network 
and spot. 

It could wind up as a walloping first (juarter for all of tv. 



Time Magazine's buy this week of a segment of Invitation to Learning on CBS 

Radio recalls a quip definition of this show that was rampant in the trade years ago. 

The definition : Invitation to Learning is the type of program that you start off by owing 
Crosley five points. 

Other CBS Radio transactions this week: 12 Impacts sold to Lorillard and a re- 
newal by Tareyton for 12 weekly segments for 13 weeks. 



ARB plans to have its Arbitron operation going in Chicago in a couple weeks 
and in L.A. by the end of the year. 

The research firm's new package also will include one-week and four-week average 
ratings in all non-monthly markets (100 of them) plus a multiple-market network com- 
petitive area report based on seven cities. 

(For an in-depth, updated study of the ARB services, see page 36.) 



Campbell Soup and Sliulton have only partially solved their clearance prob- 
lem with the Donna Reed Show on ABC Tv, even though they've bought 27 markets on a 
spot basis. 

The more important spot arrangements to date: Louisville, Greensboro, Little Rock, 
Savannah, and Duluth. Still open and undelivered: Rochester, Syracuse, Birmingham, 
Jacksonville, and San Antonio. 



There's a school of veteran air media experts on Madison Avenue which thinks the 
tv networks would do well to cut short the feuding, bickering, and recriminations 
with newspaper critics over their attitudes and reviews of programing. 

Say these admen : The networks would be exercising a far superior level of statesmanship 
by not letting themselves get upset over the columnar barbs; instead they should accent and 
dramatize the positive. In other words, keep underscoring the things that even these critics 
have praised. 

Tv could still take a licking in some areas of the hard goods business unless the crea- 
tive fellows find a formula flexible enough to meet today's need for the hard-sell. 

The problem, as outlined by the planning head of a top-rank agency this week: 
Manufacturers of white home appliances see the hard-sell principle riding high for some 
time to come; so it's imperative their advertising bear down at length on benefits. They 
recognize that tv is their best bet, but they're bothered by this question: Is tv's pattern ©f 
commercial placements too limited for their pitch requirements? 

For other news coveras* ■■* this Issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 
Spot Buys, page 24; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 61; Washington Week, page 59; sponsor 
Hears, page 60; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 57. 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 




First by a good margin, WFBM-TV dominates all 
other stations in Mid-Indiana both in total coverage 
and market penetration — map shows county percentages 
measured by Nielsen Coverage Study No. 3, Spring 1958. 

where else . . . 

— will you find satellite markets that are 33% richer 
and 50 "o bigger than the metropolitan trading zone 
itself? 

— does a central market exert such an economic pull on 
so many specific areas that are retail trading centers 
in their own right ? 

— do you find such a widespread marketing area covered 
from one central point . . . and by WFBM-TV! 

— can you buy just one station with no overlapping 
penetration by basic affihates of the same network ? 

only here -where WFBM-TV is first in Mid- 
Indiana— can you buy more honest market penetration, 
more consumer influence, for fewer dollars expended 
than anywhere else. Now it will pay you to take another 
longer, better look! We are proud of our current ARB. 

The Nation's 13 th Television Market 

. . .with the only basic NBC coverage 
of 760,000 TV set owning families. 



°*o|P-°° Indianapolis i^Se//- Major retail 
area for 18 richer-than-average counties. 1,000,000 pop- 
ulation — 350,600 families with 90% television ownership! 



O^ 



11 Satellites Each a recognized 
marketing area — and well within WFBM-TV's basic 
area of influence. Includes Marion • Anderson • 
Muncie • Bloomington • Vincennes • Terre Haute 

• Danville, Illinois • Lafayette • Peru • Logansport 

• Kokomo. 



Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agi 




SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 







NEW', 



«M 



*B>*^ 









^• 



i 



^ 




3sr 



Lii 

RALEIGH CIGIVRETTES 



jmiNGHAM 

SPONSORED BY 

ZEIGLER P4CK/N6 



B03H 






SPOHSOJ-tfRS 






»«f& 



neca's leading advertisers 
3 Ding to share in the tre- 
BrtDus impact of "Macken- 
!'s Haiders". 

Dr s of hard-fighting, hard- 
lin heroes from the archives 
th U. S. Cavalry — a fiery 
apr in American History. 

le dramatic impact of 
tic , adventure, and daring 
3t leans profitable program- 
nd or you. 







'StW 



ma 

KSL-TV 

KEYT 

WTVT 

f ^OLD-TV 

KCBD-TV 



1. PHnr»..w 



PHOEsix 
f^^^ LAKE CITY 

TUCSON 
LUBBOCK 



OAL 



I 



. lour l\ST Of OIHW 



RTI,T 

i 

»N ;iES 

EVIE 
D'lO 

IHVLE 



LIHLE ROCK 

SPONSORED BY 

KROGER 








I\'uUunal and regional spot buys 
in ivork now or recently coinyleted 



brings the 
spots in UVi! 








^^ SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

American Chicle Co., Lonji Island City. \. Y.. is enterin^j toj) mar- 
kets for its Rolaids and Clorets. The schedule starts 1 October, runs 
through the end of the year. Minutes during nighttime slots are 
being scheduled; frequency depends upon the market. The buyer is 
Jack Dougherty: the agency is Ted Bates & Co., New York. 

The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, is initiating a campaign 
in scattered markets for its Crisco. The schedule starts 1 October, 
runs through the P&G contract year. Minute announcements, both 
daytime and nighttime, are being used, with frequencies varying. 
The buyer is Bill McGivney: the agency is Compton Advertising. 
Inc.. New York. 

Family Products Division, Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co.. 
Inc.. Morris Plains, N. J., is planning a campaign for its Listerine 
products. The schedule starts 6 October, runs through December. 
Minutes and chainbreaks during nighttime periods are being placed: 
frequency depends upon the market. The buyers are Frank Sweene\ 
and Bill Millar; the agency is Lambert & Feasley, Inc., New York. 

Lever Bros. Co., New York, is entering top markets for its Praise 
soap. The campaign starts 5 October; minutes and chainbreaks 
during night slots are being used. Frequency depends upon the mar- 
ket. The buyers are John Shima and Mary Dwyer; the agency i> 
Kenyon d Eckhardt. Inc.. New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Wise Potato Chip Co., Berwick. Pa., is going into various markets 
for its potato chips. The schedule starts 1 October, runs from two to 
four weeks, depending upon the market. Minutes during daytime 
segments are being slotted, with frequencies varying. The buyer is 
Bill McLaughlin; the agency is the Lynn Organization, Wilkes- 
Barre. Pa. 

The Texas Co., New York, is kicking off a campaign in top markets 
throughout the country for its Texaco gasolines and oils. The four- 
week schedule starts 2 October. Minutes during both daytime and 
nighttime periods are being slotted; frequency depends upon the 
market. The buyer is Jeremy Sprague; the agency is Cunningham 
& Walsh. Inc.. New York. 

B. C. Remedy Co., Durham. N. C. is entering tojj markets for its 
B. C. headache tablets. The campaign starts in October for 13 weeks. 
Minutes during both daytime and nighttime segments are being 
|jla<ed: frequency varies from market to market. The buyer is 
Martha (iehring: the agency is N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc., Philadelphia. 

Esso Standard Oil Co., New York, is entering top markets for its 
Uniflo Motor Oil. The eight-week campaign starts in October. Min- 
utes during traffic hours are being scheduled; frequency depends 
upon the market. The buyer is Dick Branigan; the agency is 
M.Cann-FrirksoM. Inc.. New York. 



27 .SKPTKMBKI! lO.'Jo 



/ 




Qn movin' pelves - and pizza 



obody around WoOD-TV is stupid enough to recommend 
at old jazz of trying to sell refrigerators to Eskimos. 
) — when our esteemed client, the Pizza Palace, declared 
willingness to pop for a schedule, local salesman Dave Mc- 
)nnaughey pitched the one WooD-TV show that is frankly 
jck 'N' Roll — O'Hara's BOP Hop on Saturday afternoon, 
le result was a sellout of all pizzas before the dinner hour 
d passed — not once, but twice! Other advertisers like 
: ven-Up, original and major sponsor; Seyfert's (Potato 
ips) ; Eckrich (Hot Dogs) ; Leonard Distributing (Record 
ayers) ; are also happy as gold bugs on the mother lode. 
these clients who have bought Bop Hop, cash register 



results are a lot more impressive than the show's top 
ARE rating. 

For some products, teenagers are all-important — and 
Wood-TV has the show and the personality to reach them. 
If you want to emulate the Pizza Palace, consider O'Hara's 
selling ability on BOP Hop the next time Katz advises there 
is an availability. 

WOOD-TV is first — morning, noon, night, Monday 
through Sunday — May '58 ARB Grand Rapids 

WOOD-AM is first — morning, noon, night, Monday 
through Sunday — April '58 Pulse Grand Rapids 




Everybody in Western Michigan is a WOODwatcher. 



V\fOOD 



AIW 
TV 



WOODIand Center, Grand Rapids, Michigan 



WOOD-TV - NBC Basic 
Battle Creek, Kalamazo 



for Westert 
3, Muskegoi 



Vlichigan: Grand Rapids, 
. NA/OOD - Radio - NBC 



!> 




Be Sociable../' 




Be sociable, have a Pepsi." That theme earmarks 
one of the important advertising campaigns of 
broadcast history: Pepsi-Cola's current 14-week 
drive on all four radio networks at once. Pepsi 
tapped network radio for this promotion to reach 
and register with a total population. ( Campaign 
magnitude: an estimated half-6i7^zon impressions.) 
As the company said, "...no other medium 
offers the speed , penetration , saturation and 
continuity; nor can any other medium reach 
so many people at a comparable cost per thousand 
impressions." So whether you need all four 
networks or one (we know one)— have network 
radio, and be sociable. Mix with people.... 
Circulate more! 



CBS Radio 



Network 




Look who's advertising on TV now! 



Local businessmen — most of whom never could afford spot commercials until the advent of Ampex 

Videotape"^' Recording. For Videotape cuts production costs to ribbons — brings "live local" spots v*/ithin 

the reach of almost everyone. 

Scheduling to reach selected audiences is much easier too. Commercials can be pre-recorded at the 

convenience of both station and advertiser, then run in any availability, anytime. 

Opening new retail markets and expanding income potentials for stations are just two of many benefits of 

Videotape Recording. Write today for the complete story. Learn too how easy it is to acquire a VR-1000 

through Ampex purchase or leasing plans. 

CONVERTS TO COLOR ANYTIME • LIVE QUALITY • IMMEDIATE PLAYBACK • PRACTICAL EDITING • TAPES INTERCHANGEABLE • TAPES ERASABLE, REUSABLE • LOWEST OVERALL COST 



350 CHARTER STREET, REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA CORPORATION 

Offices in Principal Citi 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



49th and 
ladison 



UN guide 

1 thought you might be interested in 
the addition of the UN logo to our 
stationery. The stationery idea was 
instituted by a jewelry firm in Provi- 
dence, namely Anson, Inc. We were 
so impressed with the idea that we ad- 
ded it to our stationery. 

Soon you will see the same logo on 
the tail of all airlines as the original 
idea was the brainchild of Charles 
Dent, an airline pilot. We are probably 
the first broadcaster to have the logo 
and I sincerely hope the idea will 
spread. The United States Committee 
for United Nations is promoting this 
plan and we are trying to help all we 
can. 

I hope you like the idea. 
J. S. Sinclair 
Station Manager 
WJAR, WJAR-TV 
Providence, R. I. 



! the United Stat 



about the U.N. 



Local tie-in 

Enjoy your magazine tremendously 
and although we are not located in a 
prime market, we use the articles in 
SPONSOR to tie in with local needs as 
they arise in television advertising. 

E. F. Bourque 

Television-Dir. WINK-TV 

Fort Myers, Fla. 

P&G's creativeness 

As a one-time local TV film producer 
in Chicago and currently as a film 
commercial editor at WBBM-TV, I 
couldn't agree with you more on your 
article "P&G and creativeness," 
SPONSOR, 30 August. 

Sincerely yours, 
Arthur D. Sakelson 
Film Department 
WBBM-TV Chicago 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Sponsor, sponsor 

Congratulations, Gentlemen . . . 

on "Nobody Gets the Business" in 
your August 16th issue. 

We liked it so much that we have 
only one question: How many reprints 
can we get and what is the cost? 
Ronny Kahn 
Sales mgr., 
KYA, San Francisco 



Internationalism 

A letter we received this morning 
probably gets the nomination for the 
most interesting request for our "Report 
on Local Radio Programing," printed 
in SPONSOR. As you can well imagine, 
we have received hundreds of requests 
for this report from all over the coun- 
try and into Canada and the British 
Isles. But this is the first request we 
have received from Hongkong. 

I am sure that the second paragraph 
of Mr. George Ho's letter is of special 
interest to you. I'll bet you didn't 
know your readership had such an 
international flavor! 

Arthur H. McCoy 
Exec, vice pres., 
John Blair & Co., 
New York 

• Reader Ho is managing director of Coddard 
& Co.. Ltd., manufacturers representatives. He 
wrote that he had learned about the Blair Report 



Readers read 

Oops — you forgot two. 

On page nineteen of your Septem- 
ber 13th Sponsor-Scope you list the 
shows with Corporate names in the 
title. The two you overlooked are: 

Westinghouse Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz 
Show and Westinghouse Desilu Play- 
house. 

You see I do read your magazine. 
J. Gilbert Baird 
Sales prom, mgr.. 
Consumer Products, 
Westinghouse Elec. Corp., 
Mansfield, Ohio 



We taped the 
weekend shows 




Mr. Ken James, Program Director 
KENS-TV, San Antonio 

"We Videotaped* the weekend 
shows on our 'Summer Food 
Festival,' featuring Connie Cook. 
Cut down operating costs- 
featured 'live' guests who would 
not have been available without 
Videotape!" 



850 CHARTER 




Pjetejrs, Umfei^ 



R II 



NEW YORK CHICAGO 

250 Park Avenue Prudential Plaza 

Yukon 6-7900 Franklin 2-6373 

ATLANTA DALLAS 

Glenn BIdg. 335 Merchandise Mart 

Murray 8-5667 Riverside 7-2398 



DETROIT HOLLYWOOD 

Penobscot BIdg. 1750 N. Vine St. 

Woodward 1-4255 Hollywood 9-1688 



FT. WORTH 

406 W. Seventh St. 
Edison 6-3349 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Russ Building 
Yukon 2-9188 



Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 



\w 



BUYERS or. LISTENERS 

Out 'Hi^t w^mik Vict VcRoA 



Audience composition is an important factor in spot radio that every PG W Colonel 
keeps in mind. That's one way he can help in advertising campaign planning. And 
contrary to a popular saying — "Mostest may not always be Bestest." 

Good advertising seeks prospects who can buy the products offered. The radio 
stations and markets represented by PC W are important factors — not only in the 
communities they serve — but also to every well planned national campaign. 



Call PGW today 



• detailed market information. 



THE CALL LETTERS 

OF THE 

SALES GETTERS 

West 

KBOI- Boise 5,000 

KGMB-KHBC-Honolulu-Hilo 5,000 

KEX- Portland 50,000 

KIRO-Seattle 50,000 



Midwest 

WHO-Des Moines 50,000 

woe-Davenport 5,000 

WDZ-Decatur 1,000 

WDSM-Duluth-Superior . . 5,000 

WDAY-Fargo 5,000 

WOWO-Fort Wayne .... 50,000 
WIRE-lndianapolis .... 5,000 
KMBC-KFRM-Kansas City 5,000 
WISC-Madison, Wis. . . . 1,000 
WMBD- Peoria 5,000 



'B"¥^^1RB, IMC. 



M I 



Southwest 

KFDM-Beaumont . . . 5,000 
KRYS-Corpus Christi . . 1,000 
WBAP-Fort Worth-Dallas 50,000 
KTRH- Houston .... 50,000 
KENS-San Antonio . . . 50,000 



East 

WBZ-t-WBZA-Boston 

Springfi 
WGR-Buffalo 
KYW-Cleveland 
WWJ- Detroit 



^^K 



and 

ield 51,000 
5,000 
50,000 
5,000 
250 
50,000 



Southeast 

WCSC-Charleston, S. C. 
WIST-Charlotte .... 
WIS-Columbia, S. C. . . 
WSVA-Harrisonburg, Va. 
WPTF-Raleigh-Durham . 
WDBJ-Roanoke .... 



5.000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
50,000 
5,000 



TELEVISION 



KANSAS 



IS 



^ KTVH 




BASIC CBS 

SERVING PLUS 

14 OTHER IMPORTANT 
KANSAS COMMUNITIES 

BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 



STUDIOS IN HUTCHINSON AND WICHITA 
HOWARD 0. PETERSON, GENERAL MANAGER 



Hpi^ HUTcWWsO^^B 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



^SPONSOR 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 





Hlow soap's 

Among 


big three rank in tv and radio 

all advertisers for 2nd quarter, 1958 






All national 
advertising'^ 


Net 
tv 


Spot 
tv 


Net 
Radio 


Spot 
Radio 


P&G 


1st 


1st 


1st 


40th 


27th 


LEVER 


7th 


5th 


2iul 


21st 


4th 


COLGATE 


4th 


4th 


3rcl 


13th 


8ih 


«orK,-,.:s: .,M. UAU, s,.oxsou ..,.„.,.. n,. - .,:,-. 



Soaps washing out print for more air 



^ The Big Three soap makers, already huge radio and 
tv advertisers, are swinging even more heavily to air media 

^ Lever, for one, has cut print drastically this year, to 
gain the speed, impact, and flexibility that air media offer 



»^rocter & Gamble, Lever Brothers 
Co. and Colgate-Palmolive Co. — the 
Big Three soap companies who domi- 
nate the $1 billion soap and syn- 
thetic detergent market — currently are 
undergoing a significant reappraisal 
of their media strategy. 

The Big Three are, of course, long- 
time leaders among air media adver- 
tisers; as the chart above shows, they 
are 1-2-3 among spot tv advertisers, 
well up in network tv, and (except for 
P&G in net radio) among the top 30 



advertisers in both spot and network 
radio. 

Yet if current trends continue, here's 
what's going to happen : 

• More soap money will be moving 
out of print — especially magazines — • 
and into radio/tv. 

• The way the soap makers use air 
media also is changing. 

Lever Bros., for example, has been 
making drastic cuts in its magazine ex- 
penditures. At its present pace, Lever 
will spend about $1.5 million less in 



magazines this year than in 1957. But 
at the rate Lever is plunging into tv, 
the company should spend about $4 
more in net tv and $3 million more in 
spot than last year. 

P&G and Colgate are not shifting 
budgets from print to tv so heavily or 
so fast, but the trend is unmistakable. 
SPONSOR interviews with top agency, 
network and rep executives indicate 
they expect all three soap makers to 
continue a heavy swing to both radio 
and television. 

Why, when they're already such 
heavy spenders in air media, are the 
Big Three moving even further in that 
direction? 

There is no single dominant reason, 
according to most admen interviewed 
by SPONSOR. But these are the primary 
reasons: 

1) Soap makers are becoming more 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



HOW SOAP'S BIG THREE ARE 



■ 


NCREASING TV SPENDINCa k 




III lu-tMoik tv r 




1st half 




1956 1957 1958 


P&G 


S»3.457.;«9 S47.0 16.015 $2].W1,781 


Colgate 


19,880.282 19,375,713 10.320,121 


Lever 


11,322,643 16.297,289 10,288,263 




III sDot tv h 




1st half 




1956 1957 1958 


P&G 


§17.522,450 825,916,840 $14,287,600 


Colgate 


7,314,700 7,739,080 4,759,100 M 


Lever 


4.535,010 7,642,980 5,576,700 3 


SOURCE: TxB 


1 


Ijjjjjjppip- ;*-•>' ' ' ^^^^^P^^^^^^SPI^^^^RfHIRf^^'^^^'^SRHMi 


WHAT SOAP'S BIG THREE MEAN TO 


* THE 


TOP ADVERTISING AGENCIES 


1 La.vear 


. the Bis; Three soap manufacturers spent almost $175 million 


m in mea^iurable media, and by the end of this year the total probably will 


hit $200 mil 


ion. 


Expenditures of this size, especially when split iij) into sejjarate adver- 


tising accounts, spell a bonanza for many a majdi ai;»ii( v. 


Here is 


1 list of only the soap brands of iln- Wrj. llir.e- (excluding 


dentifrice, s 


hampoo, food or other products l. -howinn how tliey are 


apportioned 


Brand Company * 


Agency 


Y&R 


Cheer, Spic & Span P&C 


' JWT 


Rinso, Rinso Blue, Lux Flakes, Lux Toilet Lever 




Soap, Lux Liquid 


BBDO 


Surf, Wisk. Cayla Lever 


Bates 


Fab, Octagon, Palmolive Colgate 


B&B 


Tide, Zest, Ivory Snow P&C 


Burnett 


Camay, Joy, Lava P&G 


D-F-S 


Biz, Dreft, Oxydol, Dash, Liquid Dreft P&G 


Compton 


Duz, Ivory Soap, Ivory Flakes, Liquid P&G 




Ivory Detergent, Comet, Cascade 


K&E 


Praise Lever 


SSC&B 


Breeze, Hum, Silver Dust, Lifebuoy Lever 


L&N 


Ad Detergent, Zest, Vel Liquid Detergent Colgate 




and bar soap 


C&W 


Super Suds Colgate 


D'Arcy 


Cashmere Bouquet Colgate 


NC&K 


Vel powder Colgate 


NL&B 


All, Dishwasher All, Swan Lever 


Hoyt 


Kirkman Soap Colgate 



convinced then ever that a "low-inter- 
est" product like soap (as opposed to 
automobiles, appliances, etc.) needs a 
high-interest medium like tv. One soaj) 
account executive put it this way: "The 
soap companies always have known 
that tv has an interest level higher 
than magazines. But as competition in- 
creases, the Big Three are more aware 
than ever that a print ad doesn't sur 
ceed in stopping the consumer nearh 
so well as a commercial." And llie 
marketing situation resulting from the 
growth of the supermarket also forced 
the soap makers to rely heaviest on the 
medium with the greatest impact and 
frequency potential. 

2 1 The continuing flood of new 
products means a greater need for air 
time. NBC, for example, estimates that 
209f of the money spent in spot tv 
today by the Big Three goes into prod- 
ucts that didn't exist two years ago. 
With the introduction of liquid deter- 
gents and the synthetic detergent bars, 
the number of soap products is multi- 
plying fast. And air media now are 
the backbone of virtually every new 
product introduction campaign. 

3) Air media seem to be doing a 
far more effective selling job than 
print. One example offered by a CBS 
spot sales executive shows how soap 
companies are being swayed from 
print: 

When Lever acquired the marketing 
rights to Monsanto's All recently, the 
brand was strong in print. CBS, 
backed by a wealth of research and 
aided by the fact that All's sales were 
slipping with its print campaign, 
proved to Lever that the soap brands 
heaviest in tv were gaining the most in 
sales. The result: All is now using 
da\time minutes in tv. 

4) Soap sales are practically reces- 
sion-proof — people wash whether they 
are employed or unemployed. Last 
> ear. soap and synthetic detergent sales 
\irtually hit the $1 billion mark, a 
9.'.^' '( increase over 1956, representing 
a j)er-person consumption of 28^/2 '^8. 
And this record probably will be im- 
proved in 1958. 

Sales increases, especially to adver- 
lising-minded soap companies, mean 
bigger ad budgets. Since the soap 
makers invest such a vast share of their 
ad budgets in air (P&G, for example, 
|)uts almost 80% of it's ad budget into 
tv). higher budgets automatically 
mean more radio/tv revenue. 

In addition to spending more money 
in air media, the soap makers also ar- 



• 27 SEI'TEMBKR 19.5! 



ic- e:.anuning their old attitudes to- 
ward radio and tv. Just as PiiG final- 
ly dropped the rule that it wouldn't 
sponsor a tv show it didn't own, all 
three soap leaders are studying some of 
the old taboos. 

One of the most important of these 
is the soap industry's preference for 
minutes. As one network official ex- 
plains it, "We never got anywhere for 
\ears trying to persuade them that you 
can sell soap with a 20, and they 
V. ouldn't even listen when we talked 
Ill-second spots." 

The soap companies' over-riding ob- 
jection to anything shorter than a 60 
(except in introduction campaigns) 
has its basis in this basic marketing 
rule: when your product is similar to 
so many others, you need enough time 
to point out the differences. 

Now, however, soap companies are 
beginning to buy 20's in fringe time at 
night. And again, there are several 
reasons for this shift. 

One is shorter copy. Colgate's Zest. 
for example, uses the theme "For the 
first time in your life, feel realh 
clean." It is a point that can be made 
quickly, and a 20 can do it as well — if 
not better— than a 60. P&G's Ivor\ 
bar soap is another example; until 
about a year ago it had always used 
60's; now it has started buying 20's. 

Another reason for buying 20's in 
fringe nighttime is that 60's in prime 
night hours are becoming as scarce as 
a bar of Ivory in Lever House. And 
soap companies, according to some 
spot tv salesmen, don't buy fast enough 
or early enough to get the availabili- 
ties when they're open. 

A third reason involves turnover 
audience. All three soap makers are 
so heavy in daytime tv that they want 
to get the turnover audience which 
fringe time at night offers. 

All these reasons, obviously, vary 
with individual brands. For example, 
P&G uses 20's for Liquid Ivory be- 
cause the company feels it can capi- 
talize on the long-established Ivory 
name and therefore get the message 
across in less time. And the Big 
Three has always used 20's to launch 
new products, usually dropping them 
for 60's once the product was on its 
feet.. Because they're using many more 
spots, however, they still add up to 
more over-all commercial time. 

One interesting aspect of the soap 
industry is the relative ability of time- 
buyers in the Big Three soap compa- 
nies, sponsor's survey of both station 



of the request and the limited availa- 
bilities, that not much was left. By 
the time the timebuyer got the availa- 
bilities list and the time he made his 
decision, there was virtually nothing 
left at desirable times. 

"The timebuyers don't listen to us 
when we try to help them buy spot," 
said this executive. "And we can be a 
big help if they'll let us. Even in the 
soap industry, too much money is 
being spent by people who know too 
little about spot television." 

In terms of net tv strategy, these 




representatives and network spot divi- 
sions has turned up these items. 

The soap timebuyers vary widely 
in shrewdness. In general, P&G buyers 
are rated as the smartest, even though 
they are often bound by P&G rules. 
An executive in one representative firm 
insists that P&G buyers have millions 
to spend, but little imagination in the 
way they spend it. 

Lever timebuyers, on the other hand, 
use more imagination and have a freer 
hand, say many reps. Colgate time- 
buyers are getting more freedom, but 



CULLIGAN'S TWO-WAY SOAP SELL 

In an exclusive interview with sponsor last week, NBC executive vice- 
president Matthew J. (Joe) Ciilligan expounded a new advertising and 
marketing strategy which he feels has pertinence to all advertisers — e'-pe- 
cially to soap manufacturers. 

The theory (which may develop into a full-scale sales campaign by 
NBC Radio) is called Engineered Circulation. 

Here's the basic premise: advertise use of the product when the 
consumer is likely to be using it, and advertise purchase of the product 
when the consumer is ready to go out and buy. 

In recent months. Culligan told sponsor, he has been meeting with 
>oap advertisers (among others) to explain his idea. Here, in essence, i« 
Ikiw he presents it: 

■'A soap manufacturer's worst enemy is a package of his own product 
.-itting on the housewife's shelf. As long as it sits there, she isn't likely 
to buy another box. 

"The idea of Engineered Circulation is to stress use of the product in 
radio copy just about the time the housewife is ready to wash dishes or 
the family wash. And stress purchase of the product al>out the time she's 
ready to go shopping. 

"Imagine a housewife about to dig into the evening dishes. Just then, 
a radio spot asks her. 'Are your hands red and rough? Don't put them in 
that dishwater unless you are using Sudsy soap.' What impact that would 
have in moving Sudsy off the kitchen shelf. 

"Then, when she's on her way to the supermarket in the morning, let 
your radio copy sell her on buying Sudsy. By the time she reache« the 
soap section, she's going to head straight for Sudsy." 



are still bound by company policy 
more than Lever timebuyers are. 

Not all reps and network spot sales- 
men are convinced that P&G has the 
shrewdest buyers. A key sales execu- 
tive of one network told SPONSOR this 
story. 

The top timebuyer on one P&G ac- 
count called the network, asking for a 
list of availabilities for minute spots, 
both daytime and night, five or six 
spots per market. The network man 
pointed out, considering the lateness 



are some of the changes which are tak- 
ing place among the Big Three: 

P&G is still numbers-oriented, buys 
for maximum power, highest ratings 
over a period of time. In terms of 
daytime, where P&G has no less than 
13 network shows, the pattern is to 
buy a weekly strip. As one agency- 
man put it. They have the power and 
enough brands to do it that way, and 
they probably always will do it that 
way." P&G, which spent about $8 mil- 
( Please turn to page 76) 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 




BEHIND THE RATINGS SYSTEMS— PART U 



ARB expands its measurements 



^ This week begins new program of enlarging services 
as one-week, four-week ratings go into many markets 

^ Arhitron, the instantaneous yardstick, begins to fur- 
nish local dailies for Chicago; will soon report in L.A. 



ncidental for special i 



might T 



n hat ARB »urveyx: Television viewing, 
nalional and local. 

Kindg of report*: Total national report; 
first and second week of each month. Local 
reports in about 130 markets, broken down 
as follows: three Arbilrons: 100 one-week, 
four-week : 16 monthly : 30 markets varying 
from one-week to one and join. ( Much of 



this c 



see accompanying text.) 
ured: Sign-on to sign- 



eragc is n, 
Viewing times i 
off. 

Techniques: Arbilron, the new electronic 
instantaneous measurement {does not report 
audience composition — simply homes tuned 
in ) . Diary based on random sampling, aver- 
ages more than 300 homes per market. Tele- 



Extras: Annual market summaries, "A to Z 
Coverage Study" based on coverage of Sta- 
tions. printed annually. 

I"ext week, the American Research 
Bureau, Inc., more familiarly known to 
the men who watch the tv ratings as 
ARB, begins an expansion of services. 
Most significant areas of expansion 
will be: 

• About 100 markets not heretofon 
reported on a monthly ratings basi^ 
will now get both one-week ratings and 



27 SEPTEMBKK 1958 



four-week averages. This new service 
lui? been tested since May. 

• Arbitron, the instantaneous audi- 
t iKC yardstick, will now be used in Chi- 
( a^o to furnish overnight local reports 
on that market as is now being done 
ill New York. This operation is ready 
to go. By year's end, Los Angeles also 
will get local Arbitron measurements. 

• For about 150 markets, ARB re- 
|,orts will now include daytime audi- 
ence composition and Monday through 
Friday cumulative ratings. 

• A complete 1959 package is now 
lieing offered which includes along with 
locals, nationals and Arbitron, a mul- 
tiple-market network competitive area 
report based on seven cities. 

This expansion is symptomatic of 
the seemingly inexhaustible quest for 
more and faster information on the 
television audience by agencies and ad- 
\ertisers. It also reflects the growing 
interest of stations themselves in such 
(lata which they can then use either as 
a sales tool or as a key to programing. 
For example, when A.RB decided last 
spring to introduce one-week, four- 
week ratings in its non-monthly mar- 
kets (first test market was Houston, in 
May), cHents were queried on whether 
they actually wanted this extra meas- 
urement. Of advertisers and agencies, 
95% were in favor of it; no longer 
would they have to wonder about what 
audiences were watching between sur- 
vey weeks or whether the station that 
showed up so well during the measured 
week might not have thrown all its pro- 
graming weight into that one period, 
saving its less appealing fare for the 
weeks when noses weren't being count- 
ed. That the buyers of tv time wanted 
this information from ARB was to be 
expected; the surprising thing — and a 
healthy sign — is that the majority of 
stations (about 75%) also were in 
favor of it. 

For ARB, the expansion is simply 
another milestone along a road that 
stretches back to 1948 in Washington, 
D. C, when James Seller left his posi- 
tion with WRC-TV as assistant to Gen- 
eral Manager Carleton Smith, and with 
a handful of local station clients set up 
American Research Bureau in a small 
office in the National Press building. 
(WRC-TV is still among ARB's Wash- 
ingfon subscribers.) 

At that time, the ARB staff com- 
prised Seiler, the president; his wife, 
Betty (they met during World War II 
when she was a Wave and he a Lt. 
Commander in Naval Intelligence) ; 



HOW THE DIARY TECHNIQUE WORKS 

1. A typical market is about to be surveyed. From a telephone direc- 
tory of that market, ARB selects a random, or "probability" sample of 
names. Sample is not selected on a stratified basis; just names of 
phone subscribers picked out between A and Z. 

2. Sample is then sent to ARB interviewers in that market. Each of 
these interviewers must cover about .50 homes, explaining to the house- 
holder that he has been selected for a survey and will he keep a diary 
of what the family watches. ARB headquarters is notified of names of 
willing respondents. About 60% of families agree; 40% either refuse 
to take part, or fail to complete diaries. 

3. Diaries are mailed directly to each family. Field interviewer 
phones again, explains exactly how diary should be kept {although 
printed instructions are clear). Diarists record viewing for one week, 
noting men, women, children watching; station call letters, times. On 
a separate page, diarists are asked to mention favorite commercials, etc. 

4. At end of week, interviewer phones families to see that they've 
completed the record, ask them to mail it off at once. 

5. Diaries — self-sealing return devices — are mailed directly to ARB 
in Maryland. Tabulating, printing and mailing of reports follow. 



MONDAY, bci'iurWttCK i-, .y-< 









Nam* oi Program 






^!! 



life 



Marian Schon, Seller's secretary (she 
still is), and Kenneth Aurich, tabula- 
tion director (he still is). They meas- 
ured tv viewing in one market only — 
Washington. 

Today, the handful of subscribers 
has swelled to an impressive 528 which 
breaks down as follows: the three tv 
networks, 79 advertising agencies and 
sponsor companies (ARB claims 45 of 
the top 50 agencies in this list) who 
subscribe to the complete package, 172 
agencies and clients who subscribe to 
one or more ARB services, and 314 
television stations. Measurement cover- 
age has been extended to some 150 
markets. 

The staff, not including field super- 
visors in the ARB markets, has grown 
to about 250 spread between the head- 
quarters office in Beltsville, Md., and 
the ARB offices in New York, Chicago 
and Los Angeles. Gross dollar volume 



in the first year of ARB was about 
$30,000; this year it probably will ex- 
ceed $1.5 million. 

In 1950, ARB turned out its first na- 
tional tv report. Meanwhile it was add- 
ing new markets until, by 1952, it was 
in six — Baltimore, Philadelphia, New 
York, Chicago, Detroit, and home base 
— Washington. At this point, Seiler de- 
cided that no national picture of tv 
viewing could be close to complete 
without reports from the West Coast. 

So he took a trip there with a view 
toward opening up that area, only to 
find when he arrived that a tv research 
firm was already in operation in the 
Los Angeles-San Francisco markets. 
This was Telecue, about which Seiler 
had never heard. Telecue had never 
heard about ARB on the East Coast 
either. 

The Telecue operation had been set 
up by a firm called Coffin, Cooper & 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



Clay. All the partners were relative 
\ ouiijisters. a few years out of Whit- 
tier Collefie in California. The Coffin 
was Joe Coffin, a brother of Dr. Tom 
Coffin who heads up research at NBC 
T\ . The Cooper was Roger Cooper 
and the Cla\ was Ernest Clay. A promi- 
nent part of Telecue. but one whose 
name didn't figure in the partnership 
title was John Landreth. 

Both research firms realized that if 
ARB set up a West Coast sur\e\ the\ 
would onlv be duplicating each other. 
So .Seiler bought out Telecue. This 
was one of the high points of ARB ex- 
pansion. Not only did ARB gain new 
markets, it picked up what it sorely 
lacked at that time — personnel. The 
onlv one of the Telecue principals who 
didn't join ARB was Coffin who has 
since become a research consultant. 
Roger Cooper is ARB's station rela- 
tions manager and manager of local 
sales. Ernest Clay is head of develop- 
ment and research. John Landreth, 
who had been president of Coffin, 
Cooper & Clay, is general manager of 
ARB. ' 

In Landreth, Sailer found his ideal 
counterpart. Where Seller is strong in 
salesmanship, company policy matters, 
and planning, Landreth is an expert in 
internal organization. The result was 
a company set-up which 1») now — 
structurally at least — resembles Gen- 
eral Motors. At ARB. every depart- 
ment is an autonomous division with 



its own profit-and-loss sheets. The 
Diary testing department, for example, 
is like a single product line such as 
Chevrolet. It negotiates a yearly con- 
tract with Tabulating department for 
its services; it is up to Tabulating to 
see that it shows a profit on its work 
for Diary. If it winds up the year in 
the black, there is a bonus. But an 
error, for instance, on the part of 
Tabulating will draw a financial pen- 
alt). In theory, each department or 
service is in competition with the other, 
but Sales department still calls the shots 
in recommending one type of technique 
against another. 

The next big period of expansion for 
ARB came in 19.53 and 1954 when it 
went from 12 to CO markets. In 1955, 
it took over the television end of Hoop- 
er rating service, started about two 
years before. The move was a good 
one for both ARB and Hooper. ARB 
grew larger still; Hooper was free to 
concentrate on his first love — radio. 

Probably the last significant growth- 
jump (until the new announcement of 
this week) came late in 1957 when 
ARB unveiled the aptly-named Arbi- 
tron — an answer to the impatient ad- 
man's prayer. Covering the New York 
market since then with daily local re- 
ports, it is about to be turned loose in 
Chicago and Los Angeles. Seiler be- 
lieves that if demand for this service is 
insistent it may extend into 10 to 20 
markets within the next few vears. 




THE RATINGS SERIES 

This series whieh began last week 
is scheduled in following issues: 

The Pulse (last week).... 20 Sept. 

ARB (this week) 27 Sept. 

Trendex 4 Oct. 

C. E. Hooper 11 Oct. 

Videodex 18 Oct, 

A. C. Nielsen 23 Oct. 



At the lime ARB took over Telecue, 
it had moved from its tiny quarters in 
Washington to a farmhouse out of 
town. Last fall, the new headquarters 
was completed — a modern research lab I 
on an 11-acre tract in Beltsville; cost 
so far about $170,000. At this mo- 
ment, architects are drawing up plans 
for an administrative wing, and in the 
)ears ahead a lot more buildings are 
envisioned for the ARB center. 

Meanwhile service to stations and ad- 
vertisers is being planned by Clay's 
development and research group; at 
least eight new services for the indus- 
try are at the drawing board stage. 

ARB, like all ratings services, is not 
without its critics. Among the chief crit- 
icisms, leveled at its basic technique — 
the "supervised" diary method — is that 
there is no way of measuring an audi- 
ence at chainbreaks, whether they 
switched channels ahead of or after the 
commercials, or whether they ever con- 
sciously saw a commercial at all. The 
other bandillero thrust into the shoul- 
ders of the diary technique is the doubt 
that diarists are either conscientious 
or accurate. I The answers of ARB to 
such critiques will be answered be- 
low.) The thing that must be remem- 
bered, despite the fact that ARB is 
jiractically synonomous with diary is 
that the service actually offers three 
It-clmiques of measurements: 

• Diary. (See box on page 37 for 
details. I This method has been used 
bv ARB for nine years, is its mainstay. 
The biggest rebuttal ARB offers critics 
of the method is that in questionable 
cases it has been checked and re- 
( lie(;ked, tested and re-tested against 
other methods and results have justified 
the original diary approach. That tele- 
vision viewers may refuse to keep or 
fail to keep a diary of what they watch 
is something ARB has taken into con- 
sideration. They know that about 40% 
{Please turn to pa^e 75) 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 195n 



Once upon a time, advertising agencies 

began trading personnel just the way major 

league baseball teams do. And like the 

majors, they had a farm system, scouts, and 

even a world series. Here, in this SPONSOR fantasy, 

is the remarkable story of . . . 



The timebuyer 
who 
struck out 



By E. A. Chambers 

Ra^io/lv copyivriter 
Anderson & Cairns 

It was late September, and a rainy 
day in New York. High above Madi- 
son Avenue, five men sat around a 
table discussing trades for the upcom- 
ing world series. 

The advertising pennant race had 
been an exciting one down to the wire. 
Only a few days before, McCann- 
Erickson had moved into first place 
with a new victory in the accounts won 
column, and was now* just a shade 
ahead of Leo Burnett. 

The men at the conference table all 
knew why McCann was ahead. After 
all, the New Yorkers with their farm 
system had power in depth at everv 
position. Burnett, at the same time, 
was moving up fast. They had come 
up with two sensational rookies: a hot 
shot copywriter from the Triple-A 
league, and a lefthanded account execu- 
tive with plenty of stuff on the ball. 

But now, only a week before the 
serie's, both McCann and Burnett were 
jockeying for position. Only four per- 
centage points behind, Burnett was 
looking for a tv producer for extra 
bench strength, and McCann had just 
the man. 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 19.58 




McCann, too. wanted to prepare for 
the series. Old Marse Marion would 
give his psych degree for a switch- 
hitting timebuyer, one that could buy 
network as well as local. 

And there was none better than Yogi 
Farragut. 

In 11 years with Burnett, Yogi had 
rewritten the record books. He was 
the first triple-spot timebuyer the game 
had ever known. Who could ever forget 
that fabulous night in Minneapolis 
when Big Farragut's triple play gal- 
vanized the whole advertising world: 

9:29.40— WHAM! A 20-second spot 
for Marlboro. 

9:30.00— WHAM! An ID for Kel- 
logg- 

9:30.10— WHAM! A Joy spot. 

McCann wanted Farragut, and 
wanted him badly. They were willing 
to swap "Mudcat" Max Grant, the 
producer with a 23.7 Nielsen average 
for the season. As negotiations pro- 
ceeded. Marse Marion agreed to throw 
in a utiHty art director. But it still 
wasn't enough; the tattooed brawlers 
from the Windy City wanted more for 
Yogi Farragut. 

Outside in the hall, a Burnett v.p. 
waited impatiently for a phone call. 
At 4:45 it came. It was Chief White- 
horn, the eagle-eyed Burnett scout and 



a great account man in his day. The 
Burnett v.p. waited anxiously for the 
word. 

"Me sign kid up,"' reported the 
Chief. "Fifty grand and three year 
contract. Kid has heap big voice, dial 
telephone with either hand, knows 
when a rep is throwing high hard one. 
Natural born timebuyer — loves mar- 
tinis, hates vermouth. Kid named Rudy 
"Cost-per-1.000"' Prosciutto. Majored 
in Standard Rate & Data at UCLA. Go 
ahead trade Farragut." 

It took 10 minutes to wrap up the 
trade, and w ithin an hour Farragut was 
packed and on his way to McCann's 
Lexington Avenue vivarium. 

It wasn't until the day of the first 
series game that McCann learned what 
Burnett had known all along. The NAB 
was blowing the whistle on triple- 
spotting: it was going the way of the 
spitball. 

Yogi, a veteran of the old rough and 
tumble school of time-buying, made 
only one appearance at the plate and 
struck out. He retired from baseball, 
and is now making a comfortable living 
in Florida selling bootleg Volkswagens. 

The series? Neither McCann nor 
Burnett won it. They went out to 
lunch at Rattazzi's the day before the 
series started, never came back. ^ 



WHERE'S ^'MADISON AVENUE'' GONE TO? 

^ Three out of four new advertising hea(l(|uarters 
shift to Park, Lex and Fifth— awav from Madison Avenue 



T (HI ( ant It'll Madison Avenue with- 
oul a map an\ more. "The street" to- 
day is as much Park or Fifth as Madi- 
son. Look at agencies that moved in 
the last two years: fewer than one in 
four signed Madison Avenue leases. 
To keep track there's a list of new 
agency addresses in the next column. 

sponsor's geographical study of New 
^ ork agencies revealed an explosion 
that's happened in the last few years — 
Kast as far as Lexington and West even 
to Sixth Avenue. The North-South 
boundaries of the ad center have been 
unchanged: 37th street to 60th street. 

Despite the scattering, Madison 
Avenue is still the axis of agency loca- 
tions and is the single hiost common 
address. Fifth Avenue is second, fol- 
lowed by Park Avenue and the shops 
on sidestreets between Madison and 
F^ifth. Next are West-of-Fifth agencies, 
mostly around Rockefeller Center, with 
East-of-Park addresses smallest in 
number. 

Agencies in the Forties — convenient- 
ly near Grand Central — outnumber 
agencies in the Fifties by two to one. 
1 he center-of-gravity of today's agency 
locations (the address of the "average" 
agency I is a few steps from the corner 
of 46th and Madison. 

Office managers of major agencies 
deny there's any deliberate motive for 
a Park or Fifth address instead of one 
on Madison. It's merely that agency 
expansion created a crying need for 
1) more space — 2 1 additional facili- 
ties — and 3) modern building services. 
Midtown building booms along Park 
and Fifth Avenues were first to meet 
these demands with newly designed 
and constructed facilities such as the 
Tishman and Seagram Buildings. 

Although Madison Avenue has lost 
the majority of agency leases, it will 
undoubtedly continue as the hub of 
agency activity for a long time to 
come. "Along Madison Avenue" is now 
another idiom of admen's language the 
basis of which has been swiftly 
changed by time. 



Here are some of the important 
genc\ address changes of the last two 



Tetl Bafts 

606 Fifth at 53rd Jl" 6-0600 

Benton & Bowles 

666 Fifth at 53rd JL 2-6200 

Caples 

10 E. 40th ML' 4-6800 

Compton 

625 Madison at 58th PL 4-1100 

Robert Conahay 

261 Madison at 39th MU 2-5645 

Doherty, Clifford, 
Sleeis & Shenfield 

530 Fifth at 44th YU 6-6500 

Geyer 

595 Madison at 57th PL 1-3300 

Hockaday Associates 

201 E. 57th MU 8-9250 

Huber Hoge 

626 Broadway GR 7-8480 

Lawrence Kane & Artley 

405 Park at 54th PL 1-4120 

C. J. LaRoche 

575 Lexington at .50th PL 5-7711 

McCann-Erickson 

485 Lexington at 46th OX 7-6000 

Emit Mogul 

625 Madison at 59th TE 8-7100 

Oliver-Beckman 

120 E. 56th PL 3-7820 

Ross Roy 

214 E. 31st MU 5-1439 

Frank P. Sawdon 

60 E. .56th PL 1-4646 

Warwick & Legler 

375 Park at 52nd PL 1-4700 

Wexton & Co. 

4+1 Madison at 49th MU 8-4050 



Radio build 

^ House of Sight & Sound 
lias huiU $1 niiUion annual vol- 
ume in musical instrumenl>. 
hi-fi, records. Local radio, 
used consistently, is given 
credit for a seven-year, 100% 
sales gain hy California firm 



^% full-scale promotion on radio 
earlv next spring will mark an anni- 
versar\ of sorts for The House of 
Sight & Sound in Van Nuys, Calif. 
It will be the seventh consecutive 
spring promotion for the finn which 
specializes in retail music — from pho- 
nograph records, hi-fi and tv sets, to 
musical instruments and music lessons. 

Each of these annual spring promo- 
tions uses the same pattern: heavy ad- 
vertising on a local radio station, lead- 
ing up to the event, and culminating 
with a remote from the store itself. 
The importance of radio in the promo- 
tion is easy to understand, since Jerry 
Johnson, the firms president, gives 
radio principal credit for the store's 
growth. 

And grow it has. In 1952, the 
store's first year in business, it grossed 
$100,000. this year the volume will 
come in above $1 million, not only a 
ten-fold gain, but a high frequency 
level of sales for what are, basically, 
luxury items. 

The story of the growth of The 
House of Sight & Sound provides an 
excellent example of selecting the right 
medium, in this case radio, and then 
using it in a sufficient measure and 
with ingenuity to realize the full po- 
tential of its sales ability. 

It began differently. "Announce- 
ments of our opening in 1952 were all 
in print media, mostly newspapers," 
recalls Johnson. "As soon as we be- 
gan supplementing our campaign with 
radio, it didn't take us long to dis- 
cover that we had gotten off on the 
wrong foot. It's been radio ever since." 

S&S deploys its radio budget in two 
ways. It maintains a consistent and 
extremely heavy schedule year-round. 
To this it adds several regular promo- 
tions throughout the year. 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



|1 million sales for music store 



As an example of the store's regular 
pattern, consider its activity this past 
summer. Schedules were maintained 
on two stations; the heaviest on 
KMPC, Los Angeles. No less than 20 
quarter-hour shows weekly were run, 
scheduled every day, around the clock. 
One time slot is constant: 12:05 
a.m., seven days a week, at the top of 
John McShane's all-night show. Mon- 
day through Friday there is a set slot 
at 6:30 p.m. On Friday a quarter hour 
is added, beginning at 8:05 p.m. Satur- 
day four 15-minute slots are used 
(three between 12 and 1 p.m., one at 
6:45 p.m.) and Sunday has three quar- 
ter hours — one at 9:30 a.m., two be- 
tween 6 and 7 p.m. Even more seg- 
ments will be added next month when 
the station's baseball games are off. 
The other Los Angeles station used, 
WFAC, is an am-fm operation special- 
izing in classical music programing. 
The current schedule calls for one hour 
a week, 10-11 p.m. on Sunday. 

The strategy of Sight & Sound's cam- 
paign on this station clearly demon- 
strates the adaptability of radio, not 
only for performing various sales jobs, 
but in creating intangibles, such as 
atmosphere and an image. 

The store believes that classical mu- 
sic will make a "comeback" in 1959, 
and intends to be prepared with the 
"best and the newest." One of the fac- 
tors behind the surge is expected to be 
the technical development of binaural 
recordings and reproducing equipment. 
"Extensive use of fm has been de- 
layed until the medium could offer us 
something no other medium could," 
explains account executive John Bain- 
bridge, general manager of Tilds & 
Cantz, Los Angeles agency. 

Now, though, KFAC is preparing its 
broadcast equipment to permit stereo 
broadcasts, via am and fm, this fall. 
"Being able to sponsor a binaural 
broadcast using stereodiscs," continues 
Bainbridge, "will provide an advan- 
tage that should result in direct, and 
measurable sales." 

The regular show now on KFAC has 
the purpose, Johnson reports, of "mak- 
ing the show an already established 
listening habit" when the binaural 
broadcasting begins this fall. 

Radio has, demonstrably, proved its 
value in building The House of Sight 
& Sound over the past six years, and 




Discussing new radio strategy with Jerr> Jolinson, Sigiu & bound president, 

r), John Bainbridge, Tilds & Cantz a.e.: KMPC's salesman, Jack Mulligan and d.j. 



•, (1 t 
Stewai 



has done it in two ways. The first is 
the matter of the growth in dollar vol- 
ume, supported by a similar record in 
physical growth. In what has amount- 
ed to an annual addition, the store has 
grown from 5000 square feet in 1952 
to 14,000 now. On schedule, more will 
be added by next spring. 

The second proof occurs regularly; 
whenever the store chooses to hold a 
special-item sale or a larger promo- 
tion. As an example of the former 
Bainbridge cites a situation that oc- 
curred recently. On one of his 6:30 
p.m. strips, d.j. Bill Stewart offered a 
99^ LP special, and played selections 
from it. By 9 p.m. 120 copies, all the 
store had in stock, were sold. Many 
people came from miles away "even 



though they could have bought the 
same record for about the same price 
just around the corner," he adds. The 
same special, a week or so later, had 
comparable results. 

"Without a doubt," Johnson be- 
lieves, "radio has been a major factor 
in our successful growth. It provides 
us with numerous benefits, for instance 
protection. We are assured a 45-min- 
ute clearance from any advertising that 
might conflict with our products, while 
in newspapers our ad might be adja- 
cent to a double truck for a competitor. 

"But beyond that," he adds, "we 
can, and have, used radio to build an 
image, and atmosphere, and. most im- 
portant, sales. No other medium could 
have served us as well." ^^ 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 




How TIMEBUYERS 



get from here to there 



2. Hy hiis (ask Steve A) 3. By boat (It's the old saturation technique) 

4. By horse ^or kicks) o. By lumd f.omchody else's) 





^ 47 New York and Chicago 
ageiicyiueii set new 'all-media' 
transportation pattern in re- 
cent Michigan trip. . . . Used 
planes, huses, boats, carriages, 
rickshaws, in special market 
survey of Flint, Saginaw, Bay 
City, and Mackinac Island area 

niand it tu a tiinebuyer to get there 
somehow! Intrepid members of the 
media profession used nearly every 
known means of public transportation 
(except yak-back, camel-back, and dog- 
sled) in a recent market studv trip ar- 
ranged by Station W\EM-TV', of Flint, 
Saginaw and Bay City, Michigan. 

Forty-seven sharp-eyed agencyinen 
(and women I from New York and Chi- 
cago converged on Flint, Michigan via 
specially chartered United Airlines 
planes, as guests of James Gerity, Jr., 
president of WNEM-TV. 

First event was practically curb- 
service research, since WNEM-TV's 
headquarters are right at the airport. 
But then the hegira climbed into high 
gear. Timebuyers were hustled into 
Greyhound buses, given the gold-plated 
tour of Flint (including Chewy and 
Buick plants), taken back to their two 
planes and flown to Tri-City Airport 
which serves Saginaw, Bay City and 
Midland. A quick bus-ride look-see at 
these three bustling industrial markets 
was followed by luncheon at the Hotel 
Wenona with an address of welcome 

SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



r 



by Governor G. Mennen (Soapy) Wil- 
lians of Michigan. 

Thence, the hardy travelers re-bused 
to Tri-City Airport, flew to Pelston, 400 
miles north. There, with another as- 
sist from Greyhound they romped on 
a 26-mile jaunt to St. Ignace, over the 
6-mile lone Mackinac Bridge. At St. 
Ignace, they boarded steamers for the 
50-minute trip to Mackinac Island, the 
Bermuda of the Great Lakes, and even 
freer from automotive transportation. 
Mackinac's famous horses and car- 
riages hauled them gently up the slopes 
to the Grand Hotel, approximately one 
mile away. 

There they spent the next 24 hours 
as guests of WNEM-TV. Entertainment 
included a dinner dance, golf, swim- 
ming, tennis, plus carriage tours (more 
transportation ! ) to Fort Mackinac, 
scene of Northwest Passage exploits, 
and other historic island spots. 

It is rumored that cocktails were 
<erved. 

Entire proceedings took two days, 
with Chicago and New York contingent 
leaving Mackinac Island at 4:00 p.m. 
11 Sept. for the return (carriage to 
boat to bus to plane) jaunt. 

New York timebuyers who made the 
trip included Betty Leckner, Roger 
Clapp. Alan Yoblon, B&B; Hope Mar- 
tinez, BBDO: Paul Reardon, John 
Catanese, Bates: Beth Black, Cohen & 
Aleshire; Bob Welty, JWT; Frances 
Velthuys, D'Arcy; Betty Powell, Gey- 
er; Frank Gromer, FC&B; Murray 
Roffis, Virginia Conway, McCann; Bill 
Smith, L&N; Bob Widholm, DCS&S; 
Ethel Wieder, Compton; Charles Buc- 
cieri, Warren Bahr, Tom Comerford, 
Y&R; Lucy Kerwin. K&E: Vera Bren- 
nan, SSC&B; Edna Cathcart, Mathes; 
Rose Vitanza, Mathes: Inez Aimee, 
Norman Craig & Kummel; Bernie 
Ramussen, FS&R; Dan Kane, Elling- 
ton; Walter Teitz, DF&S; Eugene 
Grealish, Bryan Houston; Sam Gill, 
Fletcher D. Richards. 

Chicago timebuyers: Ruth Babick, 
Ludgin; Hal Bennett, Wherry, Baker 
& Tilden; Helen Davis, Clinton E. 
Frank: Don De Carlo, Needham, Louis 
& Brorby; Irene Hesse, Holy Shively, 
EWRR;' Bill Kennedy, McCann; Gene- 
vieve Lemper, FC&B; Kay Knight, 
Gordon Best; Peggy McGrath, Marian 
Reuter, Y&R; Harvey Mann, Kastor; 
Celia Odziomec, Compton; John Rohr- 
bach, JWT; Armella Selso, North Ad- 
vertising ; Evelyn Vanderploeg, Meyer- 
hoff. ^ 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



FOOTBALL SPONSORS SPENDING $13 MILLION 
ON TV AND RADIO NETWORKS THIS SEASON 



^ Grid's male-appeal draws 
auto, beer, cigarette, oil ads 

■Network football now brings in al- 
most as much business in its short 
season as boxing, the biggest net sport, 
earns all year. And trade insiders say 
football is on its way towards taking 
over as the top net sports attraction. 

In 1958, football — Sunday pro 
games, Saturday college games, and 
post-season bowls — on tv and the webs 
will climb to more than 25% of sports 
income. It's a $13 million annual busi- 
ness — without tallying millions more 
in local broadcasts. Compare the lead- 
ing network sponsors and shows in 
sponsor's chart below. 

What's behind the upsurge in foot- 
ball advertising? 

• It's the programing to reach an 
adult, male audience 

• Actuality of the competition adds 
conviction 

• Show is long and total audience 
is large 

• Rehearsals, other preparations 
aren't needed 



Kicking off the return of automotive 
money to network sports is Pontiac's 
buy of the Notre Dame games on ABC 
Radio. Other Detroit buying is ex- 
jjected to follow. 

Largest of the sports advertisers, 
Gillette, spends more than 90% of its 
$7 million budget in broadcast sports. 
This includes the Rose Bowl and Blue- 
Gray games on NBC TV and Radio. 

Male - conscious Marlboro shares 
CBS TV's Pro Football Game of the 
Week with sports-minded Falstaff. 
( Latter's local football buys include 
schedules of the Los Angeles Rams and 
San Francisco '49ers.) Amoco is 
among the other regional network 
sponsors of the CBS TV games, and 
men's toiletries Rise and Arrid Spray 
bought pre-game shows. 

NCAA College Football on NBC TV 
is sold to Gulf Oil, Bayuk cigars for 
Phillies, Libby-Owens-Ford for safety 
glass and Thermopane, and Sunbeam. 
ABC TV added to the list of male- 
target advertisers with its recent sale 
of the All-Star Game to L&M cigar- 
ettes, Mennen and Carling. ^ 



'58 network football sponsors 




TV 


RADIO 


ABC 


*ALL-STAR GAME 
L&M. Mennen. Carling 


NOTRE DAME SERIES 
Ponliac 


CBS 


*PRO FOOTBALL "GAME OF THE WEEK" 
Marlboro. Falstaff. Amoco 

PRE-GAME SHOWS 
Rise, Arrid Men's Spray 


*PRO FOOTBALL GAMES (19) 
General Cigar 


NBC 


NCAA COLLEGE FOOTBALL 
Gulf, L-O-F, Sunbeam, Bayuk 

ROSE BOWL, BLUE-GRAY GAME 

Gillette 


GAMES ON "MONITOR" (2) 
Clinton outboard motors 


.so.™ ,.,„.,...„.... 



Spot tv moves 'em faster, cheaper 




^ Drug Research Corp.'s 1958 rise in air media 
budget allocation was one of the sharpest recorded 

^ Conij)any now ranks 34th in spot tv expenditure, is 
investing currently at a rate of $3 million plus a year 



An observer of spot tv spending, 
looking at the Drug Research Corp., 
New York advertising budget for the 
second quarter of this year, would be 
hard put to document any recession. 

During that period DRC's invest- 
ment in spot tv, according to TvB, 
jumped almost 900% over the same 
months the year before. The figures: 
$8,800 for the second quarter of 1957; 
$717,200 for the same months this 
vear ! 

All of this spot tv allocation went for 
Regimen, a weight-reducing tablet. It 
does not cover the company's other 
products: Sustamin, a tablet for the 
relief of arthritis and rheumatism, as 
well as two new products: Insta-Pep, 
a vitamin-mineral formula for im- 
mediate pickup, and Jandrex, a com- 
bination sleep-wake-up tablet that will, 
DRC says, help ease the user to sleep 
at night, spur him awake the next 
morning. The last two have not yet 
achieved national distribution, and are 
advertised in 13 markets only. 

To say that DRC is sold on the ef- 
ficacy of spot tv is to understate the 
case. Regimen, the company's current 
product leader, was introduced only 
18 months ago, into a market already 
highly competitive. The odds for suc- 
cess then would seem to have been 
slight, since there were already at least 
three established products claiming 
similar benefits. 

Yet today, a year and a half later. 
Regimen is the leading product in the 
weight-reducing field. And, instead of 
being overcome by competition, it has 
pretty well outrun it all. "The compe- 
tition has tried, but it just hasn't been 
successful," reports John Andre, DRC 
president. 

DRC does not reveal its total budget 
figure, though it has been estimated at 
about $.5 million. A large percentage 
of the total ad budget (probably ap- 
proaching .50%) goes into co-op ad- 
vertising with drug chains, for tv, 
radio and newspapers, and to retailers, 
for newspapers. Of the remaining half 



more than 50% goes into air media, 
about 25% in newspapers, the balance 
divided between national and trade 
magazines. 

In its air media appropriation, 
which SPONSOR estimates to be at 
rate at about $240,000 a month. Drug 
Research divides its appropriation 
about 98% tv, 2% radio. "We use 
radio only rarely, and then to supple- 
ment, or in a few cases to substitute, 
for tv," explains George Bailey, ac- 
count executive at Kastor, Hilton, 
Chesley & Clifford. 

The decision to put the bulk of the 
budget into spot tv, since justified 
by market standing, was made early 
in 1957 when Regimen was introduced. 
The agency selected six markets that 
had proven themselves previously with 
other products, and conducted a three- 
way media test: newspapers alone, 
newspapers and radio, and newspapers 
and tv. The last was by far the most 
successful, the company reports, and 
showed an immediate sales result. 

Like other patent drug manufac- 
turers. Drug Research Corp. is close- 
mouthed about the subsequent strategy 
that made Regimen such a success. 
However industry observers, and 
others familiar with traditional drug 
marketing practices, report the follow- 
ing pattern. 

Having established that spot tv was 
the medium, the next test in introduc- 
tory markets, concerned commercials. 
Several were tried; when a promising 
version was found it was further 
refined by testing such things as a 
money-off certificate available by writ- 
ing in. 

How well did the final version work? 
The commercial was run for as long 
as six months or more in a single 
market, without any apparent sales 
fall-off. The company does not, ap- 
parently, believe in spending a lot of 
money for film and a variety of com- 
mercials, preferring instead to test ap- 
peals first, then make a good com- 
mercial. A sales story that's well done, 



and believable, can get best effect with 
one or two commercials a year, the 
industry reckons. 

The main commercial, SPONSOR 
viewers report, has featured Lester 
Morris, a rotund announcer who is 
remembered as the pitchman for Roto- 
Broil a few years back. The commer- 
cial was filmed in two takes. The first 
brings Lester on camera, identifying 
himself and noting his weight is 270 
pounds. The second part, filmed 30 
days later, features Lester again, this i 
time talking about a 28-pound loss. ' 

The problem in selling this type of i 
product, observers say, is believability. [ 
Regimen is not inexpensive ($3 for a 
10-day supply) so it has to present' 
a story that is sufficiently convincing 
and carries a strong enough promise 
to justify trying it. 

The buying schedule appears to be ! 
similarly scientific. The basic intent I 
is saturation with spots. The number \ 
used depends, of course, on market i 
conditions, but ranges from about 10 '■ 
to 50 spots a week, media men say. I 
The saturation effort is maintained as j 
long as sales justify. When the market I 
potential is approached, budget cuts 
begin, first newspapers, then tv. 

The initial entry seems to be based 
on a study of the market potential, with 
a buying power index. After deciding 
what expenditure the market can 
justify, the schedule is placed. The 
sales-advertising ratio is re-evaluated 
after eight weeks, and adjustments are 
made accordingly, observers report. 

Because both men and women are 
potential customers for Regimen, time 
and program selection is flexible, with 
the exception, obviously, of children's 
shows. Spots are bought as a package, 
run around the clock, and have ap- 
peared in such diversified surroundings 
as wrestling, movies and d.j. shows. 

Spot tv has shown two things to 
DRC. It has shown product benefit? 
to make a convincing sales story, and 
it has shown a remarkable sales return 
on the advertising investment. ^ 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



TV BASICS/OCT 



/. 



Net tv tally: prices up, dramas down 



^ SPONSOR estimates of fall average show costs : prices 
up for dramas, westerns, adventures, situation comedy 

^ Decline in half-hour, hour dramas and half-hour 
music-variety; more westerns, comedy-variety, mystery 



fi^ striking decline in the number of 
dramas headlines the highlights of 
this season's network tv schedule. 

This was apparent as the final facts 
and figures on fall programing, includ- 
ing estimates of show costs by sponsor, 
were tabulated. 

However, while there are fewer dra- 
mas, they are more expensive. The 
half-hour format is costing advertisers 
an average of 25% more. The hour 
dramas are up about 28%. 

Other highlights: 

• Situation comedies and westerns 



remain the most popular types among 
clients and networks. 

• Prices in general are up. 

• The emphasis on the half-hour 
music-variety show has gone. However, 
a combination of this type and the 
half-hour comedy-variety show, brings 
the total to about the same as last 
year. 

Here's a further comparison of 
changes in show categories and costs 
this season, compared to last: 

Last year the seven one-hour dra- 



mas came to an average cost of 
$49,000; this year, only three are 
scheduled (with two on an alternate- 
week basis), averaging $63,000. 

Last year, 12 half-hour dramas were 
on the screens, with an average cost 
of $33,000; this year, the number is 
cut to five, while the average cost is 
upped to $41,400. 

Last year, the 11 half-hour music 
variety shows averaged $43,800; this 
year the four planned are at $36,500, 
while the five half-hour comedy- 
variety shows have an average cost of 
$52,600. 

Situation comedy is down to 15, at 
$40,000; last year it numbered 18 at 
$37,900. 

Last year, 10 half-hour adventures 
were scheduled, averaging $31,000; 
this year it's nine and $35,000 respec- 
tively, along with seven half-hour 
mysteries at an average cost of 
$36,000. ^ 



1. THIS MONTH IN TELEVISION 



Network Sales Status Week Ending 27 September 

Daytime 



Nighttime 



SPONSORED HOURS 



Live 

30.4 ABCfl 

100 CBSt I 

96.7 NBC I 



■ 5.7 



tExdudlnf ptrtlclwtloo iboni. 



% 

Live 

48.5 ABCIi 

29.8 CBSt ■ 

59.9 NBC ■ 


SPONSORED HOURS 


■ 25.6 







AVERAGE COST OF NETWORK SPONSORED PROGRAMING 



. Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Half-hour comedy-var. 
$52,600 5 


Half-hour drama 
$41,400 5 


Situation comedy 
$40,066 15 


Hour music-variety 
$111,875 4 


Half-hour music-var. 
$36,500 4 


Half-hour adventure 
$34,333 9 


Quiz 
$30,705 11 


Half-hour western 
$39,450 14 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



2. ALPHABETICAL PROGRAM INDEX 

Sponsored Nighttime Networi( Programs 6- XI p.m. 



AlcoaGoodyear Theater: 
Dr-F 

■M.Ne AlJen Show: ^ -L 

\rnlMMK Can Pla\ : Q-L 

Armstrong Circle Theatre: 
Dr-L 

Bachelor Father: Sc-F 
Alt Jack Benny: C-F 

Behind Closed Doors: A-F 

iteid Journey: A-F 

Brains and Brawn: Q-L 

Milton Bcrle: C-L 

Pat Boone: MuV-L 

George Burns Show: Sc-F 

The GalHomians: W-F 

Steve Canyon: A-F 

Cavalcade of bpons: ^p-L 

Cheyenne: W-F 

Di.k Clark: Mu-L 
"IVrry Como: \ -L 

bob Cummings Show: Sc-F 

John Daly — News 

De<-.-n.ljfr Bride: Sc-F 

Dirringer: \V-F 

D.-ilu Flav bouse: Dr-F 

Walt Disney Presents: M-F 

Dragnet: My-F 

Wyatt Earp: W-F 

Doug Edwards News: N-L&F 

Father Knows Best: Sc-F 

light Beat 

Eddie F'isher: \ -L 

Ford Show: CV-L 

Furthei 
Filer 

G.E. Theatre: Dr-F 

Jackie Gleason: C-L 

•George Gobel: CV-L 

Arthur Godfrey: \ -L 



■t2,000 
65,000 
38,000 
9.500 
45,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
37.500 
44,000 
45.000 
78.000 

14,500 
120.000 

36,000 

6.000 

32,000 

38,000 

82.000 

57.000 
Mi hr.) 

35.000 
38,000 

9.500tt 
38,000 

3.000 
98,000 
38.000 
27,500 

51.000 
58,000 
98,000 
31,000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



Alcoa, FSR; alt Goodyear. Y&R 

Greyhound, Grey; DuPont. BBDO; 
Polaroid, DDB; U. S Time, Peck; 
Noreico, LaRoche; Zenith. FC&B 

R. ). Reynolds. Esty 

Armstrong Cork. BBDO 



hitehall, Bates 



Kraft, )WT 

Chevrolet. Camp-Ewald 

Colgate, Bates 

Singer Sewing, Y&R; Lipton. Y&R 

L&M, Mc-E 

Gillette. Maxon 

Harold Ritchie, Atherton & C; Na- 



Beech-N 



t Lifesavers. Y&R 



Kimberly-Clark, FCB; Noxrema, SS 
C&B; RCA & Whirlpool, K&E; Sun- 
beam. Perrin-Paus; Amer Dairy, 
Campbell-Mithun; Knomark. Mogul 

R. ). Reynolds. Esty 

Whitehall, Bates; Lorillard, L&N 

General Foods, B6B 



S. C. 



NL&B 



Hill Bros.. Ayer; Kellogg, Burnett; 
Reynolds Metals, Buchanan: Frank 

L&M, DFS; Schick, B&B 

Gen Mills, DFS; P&C, Compton 

Whitehall. Bates; Good Year. Y&R 

Scott Paper, JWT; Lever Bros. JWT 

Bristol-Myers, DCS&S 

L&M. Mc-E 

Ford. )WT 

RCA, K&E; alt open 

Cen Elect. BBDO 



Pharmaceuticals. Parkson; Lever 

RCA & Whirlpool. K&E 

Toni, North; Pharmaceuticals. Park- 



/ane 



Fele 



: WK 



My-F 
Gunsmoke: W-F 
Have Gun, Will Travel : W-F 
Hitchcock Presents: My-F 
I Love Lucy: Sc-F 
I've Got a Secret: Q-L 

.luhilee L.S.A.: Mu-L 

Lassie: AF 

Lau Man: Vi -F 

Leave It To Beaver: Sc-F 

I.ine-l p: My-F 

M Squad: My-F 

Man ^^ith \ Camera: \-F 

Perry Mason: My-F 

Bat Ma^ter.on: W-F 
Maverick: W-F 

Meet the Press: I-L 
Millionaire: Dr-F 



, :\1,K 



: \ I, 



\.thur Murray: \ -L 
Mmmc iron, Manhattan 
Naked City: My-F 
Name that Tune: QL 



rlliw 



A-F 



Ozzie & Harriet: Sr-F 
Palli Pa^e: Mu-\ -I. 
People Are Fnnnv: M-F 



: I-L 



PI, 



ise: Dr-F 
Playhouse 90: Dr-L&F 



The Real McCoys: Sc-F 
Donna Reed Show: Sc-F 

Restless Gun: W-F 



45.000 
38.000 
40.000 
38.000 
39,000 
25,000 
27,000 
12,500 
37.000 
38,000 
36,000 
34,000 



38,000 
35.000 



30.000 
17.000 
37,000 
23.000 
48.000 
48,000 
40,000 
24,000 
38,000 
38,000 

45,000 
V2 hr. 

24,000 

36.000 
53,000t 
37.500 
36.000 



Bristol-Myers, DCS&S 

L&M, DFS; Sperry Rand il wk 
YfrR 

Whitehall, Bates; alt Lever. )V 

Bristol-Myers, Y&R 

Pillsbury. Burnett. Clairol. FC6 

R I Reynolds. Esty 

Williamson-Dickie. Evans & A 

Campbell Soup. BBDO 

R. ). Reynolds. Esty 

Miles Lab, Wade; Ralston, C«ia 

P&C. Y&R; Brn & Wmsn, Bate 

Amer Tobacco, SSC&B; alt « 
Mc-E 

General Electric, BBDO 



Kraft, Sealtest; )WT 
Kaiser Companies, Y&R 
Pan American Airways, JWT 
Colgate, Bates 

Revlon. LaRoche; Kellogs 
Pittsburgh Plate. Maxon 

P. Lorillard. L&N 

Manhattan Shirts. Peck 

Brown & Wmson. Quaker Or 

Whitehall. Bates 

RCA. K&E 

Kodak. JWT; Quaker Oats 

Oldsmobile. Brother 

R. ). Reynolds. Esty; Toni, Nor 

General Foods, B&B 



, |WT; 



Plymouth. Grant 



. )WT 



S. alt P&C. Compti 
; Ralston Purina, Cioci. 



8 per setrment. List does not include 
Bcf chart. Costs refer to sverage show 
ire gross (include 15% agency com- 
r -m-.c- charges. This list covers period 



(Au) Audience Participation. (0) Comedy. (D) Documentary. (Dr) Dran' (D 
Interview. (J) Juvenile. , (M) Misc.. (Mu) Music. (My) Mystery. (N) Nei. W 
Qui2. (S) Serial. (Sc) Situation Comedy. (Sp) Sports. (V) Variety. (W) V««" 

Listing continues on page 4 ^ 

SPO.\'SOR • 27 SKPTEMBKR 1958 




From this point the giant 

missile manufactured by 

Chrysler Corporation is 

shipped by air to a test site 

on the Florida Coast. 



One in a series of local personalities and features 
complementing the fine CBS Program lineup, that 
make WJBK-TV a vital force in Detroit. 
Basic CBS • 100,000 Watts 



"SAGEBHUSH SHOHTY" 

"Detroit's Favorite Kiddie Star" 

Sagebrush Shorty completely dominates his competition 
seven days a week, (Monday through Friday 8:45 AM to 
9:25 AM) (Saturday 10:30 AM to 11:00 AM) (Sunday 
11:00 AM to 12 Noon) Chatting with his small fry guests, 
spinning yarns and presenting Top Cartoons in the 1,900,000 
TV homes served by WJBK-TV. 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 




CHANNEL 



DETROIT 



f^ Stores Television. 



'^OtHfil^' 



WJBK-TV 


WAGA-TV 


WSPD-TV WJW-TV 


Detroit 


Atlanta 


Toledo Cleveland 


National Sales Offices 


625 Madison Ave. 


New York 22 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1 



3. NIGHTTIME 



C O 



P Al 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


* 




Small World 


Meet The Press 


















Twentieth 
Century 
Pitidenn.1 


Outlook 

Swiss' Family 
Robinson 




D Edwards 

«ust 






No net service 






News 




D Edwards 


News 
•Uit alt Carter 




fou Asked for It 

Sklppj Petnut 

Bdtur 


Lassie 

Campbell Soup 


Mark Saber 




No net service 
D Edwards 

■ust 






No net service 


News 
(repeat feed) 




News 

•Uit 


News 

iUit 


News 


Edwards 

Whitehall 


1^ 


Mjverick 
Eilier Oomptaln 


Bachelor Father 

ack Ben*ny 

Am Tob 


lorthwest Passage 
KCA 


Jubilee U.S.A. 

(7:30-8:30) 


Name That Tune 

Amer Home 


Tic Tac Dough 
P&G 


^ Cheyenne^ 

Nafl Carton 


Stars in Action 


Dragnet 
Bulova 


i 

TlHy, 


Maverick 


Ed Sullivan 

(8-9) 

Mercury 

alt Kodak 


Steve Allen 

Greyhound 

Polaroid 


Jubilee U.S.A. 


The Texan 

Brown & Wmsn 


Restless Gun 

Sterling Drug 

P&G 


Sugarfoot 

(altwks 7:30-8:30) 

Luden's 


™.v 


Eddie Fisher 

George Gobel 

RCA alt MTiilmool 


L.,!. 


Law Man 
R J. Keynoldi 


Ed Sullivan 


Shirley Temple 

Bros., Breck 


Bold Journey 
RaLton-Furtn. 


Father Knows Best 

Lever alt Scott 


Wells Fargo 

AmerToba^ 

alt Bulck 


"^'H'F 


To Tell the Truth 


Fisher all Gobel 


"Hi 


■ 


C. E. Theatre 

GenBIettrta 


Dinah Shore 
Chevy Show 

Cherrolet 


Voice of Firestone 

Firestone 


Danny Thomas 
G<^Food. 


Peter Cunn 

Bristol-Myers 


The Rifleman 
Miles Lab. P&G 


Arthur Godfrey 

Pharmaceuticals 


George Burns 

Show 

Colgate 

Bob Hope Show 

Buitk 


-^ 


Encounter 

(9:30-10:30) 


Hitchcock 
Theatre 


Dinah Shore 
Chevy Show 


Anybody Can Play 

R. .T. Reynolds 


Ann Southern 
G«n Food! 


Alcoa -Goodyear 
Theater 
Aim alt 
Goodyear 


Naked City 


Red Skelton 

Pet Milk 

alt S. C. Johnaon 


Bob Cummings 
Reynolds 


Pat]"* 


Encounter 


$64,000 
Question 
Revlon alt 


Loretta Young 
P&G 


This Is Music 


Desilu Playhouse 


Arthur Murray 
Party 

P. Lorillard 


Confession 


Carry Moore 

Revlon 


The Californians 

Sinter alt 

LlptOT. 


Binro 


No net servict 


Whafs My Line 
Kellon 


No net service 


John Daly News 

Whitehall 


Desilu Playhouse 


Hall of Fame 


John Daly News 

P. Lorillard 


Carry Moore 

Kellogg 


No net service 

Pre-World Series 

Special 


*'j 


.No net service 


No net service 





r In time <lot. 



Index continued... SpoHsorecl Nighttime Networic Programs 6-11 p.m. 



PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


Rin Tin Tin: A-F 


36.000 


Nabisco, K&E 


Rough Riders: W-F 


47,000t 


P. Lorillard, L&N 


77 Sunset Strip: My-F 


72,000 
(1 hour) 


Amer Chicle, Bates; Carter, Bates; 
Whitehall, Bates; Ritchie, Atherton 
& Co. 


* Dinah .Shore: V-L 


150,000 


Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 


PhU savers Show: ScF 


42,000 


Schick, B£yB; R. j. Reynolds, Esty 


$64,000 Question: Q-L 


36.000 


P. Lorillard, L&N; Revlon, Warwick 
& L 


•Red Skelton: C-F 


52,000 


Pet Milk, Gardner; alt S. C. Johnson, 
NL&B 


Small World: D-F 


28,000 


Renault Motors, NL&B; Olin Mathie- 


Ann .Southern: .Sc-F 


40,000 


Gcn Foods, B&B 


Gale Storm Show: Sc-F 


39.S00 


Nestle, B. Houston; alt open 


Sugarfoot: W-F 


78.000 


Amer Chicle, Bates; Luden's, Mathes 



Ed Sullivan Show: V-L 
Sunday News Special: N-L 

Talcs of Wells Fargo: W-F 
The Price is Right: Q-L 
The Texan: W-F 
The Thin Man: My-F 
This Is Your Life: D-L 
Danny Thomas: Sc-F 
*Tic Tac Dough: Q-L 
To TeU The Truth: Q-L 
Trackdown: A-F 
Twentieth Century: D-F 



43,800 
21,500 
37,000 
40,000 
52,000 
47,500 
23,500 
22,000 
33,500 
45,000 



SPONSORS AND A NC 



Mercury, K&E; alt Kodak «rr 



Lever, JWT; Speidel, SSCl\ 

Brown & Wmson, Bate! 

Colgate-Palmolive, Batw [■ 

P&G, B&B 

General Foods. B&B 

P&G 

Carter, Bates; Marlboro, Iw 

Amer Tobacco, BBDO; w i 
Mobil Oil, Compton 

Prudential. Rcach-Mclintc 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



G R A P 



27 SEPT. -24 OCT. 



> 


ESDAY 

NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY | 

ABC CBS NBC i 


M 


" 












































1 


T. 




News 


D Edwards 

WhltebtU 


Newt 


D Edwards 

Good Tear 


News 


^ 


c« 






No net service 






No net service 


No net service 








*^ 
Ni 

f 
I 

3M 

1 

St 


News 

(repeat feed) 


News 


D Edwards 

Whttehill 


News 


News 


D Edwards 


News 

(repeat feed) 




Ford 
(alt hour) 


Leave It To 
Beaver 

Miles Lab 
Ralston 


1 Love Lucy 

Pillsbury 

aaL 




Rin Tin Tin 
Nabisco 


Your Hit Parade 

Amer Tobacco 


Jefferson Drum 


Dick Clark Show 

Beech-Nut 


Perry Mason 

(7:39-8:30) 

Van Heusen 


People Are 
Funny 

R. J. Beyiwldi 




Wagon Train 

' (alt H hr.) 


Zorro 

AC Spat*. 7-Up 


December Bride 

General Foods 


Ed Wynn Show 

L&M, Bulova 

Gateway to the 

Mind 

Bell Telepline 


Walt Disney 
Presents 


Am Tobae 
S<iony 


Further Advent, 
of Ellery Queen 


Billy Graham 

Bill.v Graham 
Evang. Assoc. 


Perry Mason 

Parliament 

Sterling Drug 
General Foods 


Perry Como 

(»-»» 

Klmb«rI«r-OUrk. 




Price Is Right 

Lever, Spetdel 


rhe Real McCoys 

SylT.nli 


Derringer 

S. C. Johnson 


Twenty-One 


Hill Bros. 

Kellogg 

Reynolds Metal 


Jackie Cleason 

Pharmaceuticals 


Ellery Queen 


Billy Graham 


Wanted Dead 
or Alive 


tanbnDi. NooMBt 
Amer Dairy 

Knooark 


,. 


Milton Berle 


Pat Boone 
Chevy Showroom 

Chevrolet 


Zane Cray 


Behind C!osed 
Doors 

L&M alt 


Man With A 
Camera 

General Elec. 


Phil Silvers 

Schick 


M Squad 
Amer. Tobac. 

Bulova 


Lawrence Welk 

Dodge 


Gale Storm 


Steve Canyon 


;rtt 


Bat Masterson 

Kraft. Smallest 


Rough Riders 
P. I-orillard 


Playhouse 90 
(9:S0-11) 
Amer Oa. 


Ford Show 


77 Sunset Strip 

Amer. Chicle 


Playhouse 

Schlitz 


The Thin Man 

Coleate 
Fred Astaire 

Chr.vsler 


Lawrence Welk 


Have Gun, Will 
Travel 

Whitehall 
alt Lerer 


Cimarron City 

(9:30-10:30) 


r 1 


his Is Your Life 

P&G 


Stars of Jazz 


Klmb-Clark 

alt 

Allstat. 


ou Bet Your Life 

Tonl. Lever 


77 Sunset Strip 

Whitehall ' 
Harold Ritchie 


The Line Up 
P&O alt 


Cavalcade of 
Sports 

Gillette 


Music From 
Manhattan 

Manhattan Shirt 


Gunsmoke 
LAM alt 

Sperry-Band 


Cimarron City 


cle 


No Net Service 


John Daly News 

Whitehall 


Playhouse 90 


™. 


lohn Daly News 
p. Lorlllard 


Person to Person 

alt Lorillard 








Brains & Brawn 

Chesterfield 


Fight Beat 
Brlstol-Mjreri 


No net service 


No net service 


■ 



PROGRAM 



Twlty-Onc: Q-L 
U.^ Steel Hour: Dr-L 

. J 

V(^! of Firestone: Mu-L 
fW^n Train: W-F 

Mil Wallace: I-L 
;-Wi|ed-Dead or Alive: W-F 
irW^iesday Fights: Sp-L 

U^ence Welk: Mu-L 

WI's My Line: Q-L 

Edi7ynn: Sc-F 

Y(i\gkedFor It: M-F 
I Yol Bet Your Life: Q-L 
''■'Lo ta Young: Dr-F 



35,000 
60,000 



15,000 
39,000 
45.000 

17,500 



46.000 
24,000 
51,750 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



Pharmaceuticals, Parkson 
U.S. Steel, BBDO 

Firestone, Sweeney & James 
Ford, JWT; National Biscuit, K 

Philip Morris, Ayer 
Brown £> Wmson, Bates 
Mennen, Mc-E; Miles, Wade 
Dodge, Grant 



Helene Cur 
nett 



, Ludgin; Kellogg, Bur- 



L&M; Bulova, Mc-E 
Skippy Peanut Butter, CBB 
Lever, JWT; Toni, North 
P&C, B&B 



Your Hit Parade: Mu-L 
Zorro: A-F 



42,500 
37,000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



Amer Tobacco, BBDO 

AC Spark Plug, Brother; 7-Up, JWT 



Specials and Spectaculars 



PROGRAM 

Fred Astaire Show 

Bing Crosby Show 

Gateways To the Mind 

Hall of Fame 

Bop Hope Show 

Pre World Series Special 

Shirley Temple's Storybook 

Swiss Family Robinson 



COST 

390,000 
325,000 
337,500 
350,000 
320,000 
110,000 
225,000 
340,000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 

Chrysler— 10/17 
Oldsmobile, Brother— 10/1 
Bell Telephone— 10/23 
Hallmark— 10/13 
Buick, Mc-E— 10/14 
National Carbon, Esty— 9/30 

National Dairy, Ayer; Hill Bros., Ayer; 

Breck, Ayer — 10/5 
Rexall— 10/12 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 




PARAMOUNT PICIIIRE! 





lATING P0WER-MCA1V 




WBZ-TV BOSTON 
SEPT.7 THROUGH II 

*ARB COINCIDENTAL, SEPTEMBER 7, 1:0C PM 
TRENOEX RECALL, SEPTEMBER 7, 10—10:30 PM, SEPTEMBER 11, 11:15 PM 




DAYTIME 



C O 



P A It 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 






Lamp Unto My 
Feet 






For Love or 
Money 


Dough Re Mi 




For Love or 
Money 


Dough Re Mi 

(Ult 






Look Up & Live 






'lay Your Hunch 


Treasure Hunt 

Ponds 

P&O alt 




Play Your Hunch 


Treasure Hunt 

Al. (Dulver alt Dov 






Ere On N. Y. 




Day In Court 

(see Saturday) 


Arthur Godfrey 
Standard Branda 
Standard Brandi 


Price Is Right 
Lerer Bros 

alt Ponds 


Day In Court 

(see Saturday) 


Arthur Godfrey 

Libby alt sust 


Price Is Right 

Lever alt Sunshlni 
Stand Brandi 


D , 




Camera Three 




»eter Lind Hayes 

(see Saturday) 


^tt.!!" 


Concentration 

Armour alt Lever 


Peter Lind Hayes 

(see Saturday) 


Top Dollar 
Colfat. 


Concentration 

Frigidalre alt sus 
Lever alt sust 


Pa 


'^^l^'cr 






Peter Lind Hayes 


Love of Life 


Tic Tac Dough 

P*0 .It 

Dow 

Tool alt PAG 


Peter Lind Hayes 


Love of Life 

Quaker alt LIbby 

alt 


Tic Tac Dough 
Stand Brandi 


P.: 


Am.r. H«n. Prod 

alt sust 




ioH„sHop.i„s 






Mother's Day 

(see Saturday) 


Search for 
PAG 


It Could Be You 

\\Tiltelian alt 


Mother's Day 

(see Saturday) 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAO 


It Could Be Yo 

AL Culver alt sii 

alt P&G 




sust 


Cuiding^Light 


Guiding^Light 




Open Hearing 


Pro Football 




Liberace 

(see Saturday) 


No net service 


Close-Up 


Liberace 

(see Saturday) 


No net service 


Close-Up 

co-op 






News (1:»-1:S») 

■Ult 


News 
(1:«-1:S0) luit 










TEA 


As the World 
Turns 
P&G 

Sterling alt aust 


Howard Miller 
co-op 


TEA 


As the World 
Turns 

P&G alt sust 


Howard Miller 






Sterling alt 










Chance For 

(see Saturday) 


Jimmy Dean Show 


Lucky Partners 


Chance For 
Romance 


Jimmy Dean Show 

•Ult 

Miles 
alt Libby 


Lucky Partners 

Al. culver alt sus 












Art Linkletter 

Stand Brandt 

■It Lner 

Standard Brandi 


Haggis Baggis 

Menthol alt sust 




Art Linkletter 
swirt 

alt Toni 
KeIlo«f 


Haggis Baggis 

Al. Culver 
alt sust 










Beat The Clock 


•"lor/ar 


Today Is Ours 


Beat The Clock 


Big Payoff 


Today Is Ours 


is 




fif'""? 




Roller Derby 






Who Do You 
Trust? 

Beech-Nut 
General Foods 


Verdict Is Yours 
SUnd Bnndi 
Brtitol-Myen 


From These Root 


Who Do You 

Trust? 
General Foodi 


Verdict Is Yours 

Gen Mills 


From These Roof 




Roller Derby 




Watch Mr. 
Wizard 

•Hit 


American 

Bandstand 

E«itoo. 

Gen. Mills 


Brighter Day 
P&G 


Queen for a Da 

Ponds 


Bandstand 
Welsh 

General Mills 


Brighter Day 


Oueen for a Dai 

Standard Branda 
P&G 




Secret Storm 

Gen Mills 






Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 




Bowling Stars 




Youth Wants 
to Know 


American 
Bandstand 


Edge of Night 
PAO 


County Fair 


American 
Bandstand 


Edge^o^f^Night 

Sterling alt sust 


County Fair 






" Lever 




Paul Winchell 

Uam Mm. Prtid. 


The Last Word 


Frontiers of 
Faith 


American 
Bandstand 

CO OB 






American 
Bandstand 






1 


Lone Ranger 
Ota Mllli 

Smith Bro.. 


Original Amateur 


Comment 


MIckey^Mouse 

Brlsloi-Myers 






Walt Disney's 
Adventure Time 

Nahisco 






i.t.1. 



HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH & INDEX 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (48, 49) 
includes regularly scheduled programing 27 Sept. to 
24 Oct., inclusive (with possible exception of change? 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sched- 
uled programs to appear during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 



^G R A P 



27 SEPT. -24 OCT- 1 



OIESDAY 



THURSDAY 

ABC _ CBS , tiS£_ 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Treasure Hunt 

He inz alt Br illo 
Oom Prod 
tit P&G 



Play Your Hunch 



Play Your Hunc 



Price Is Right 

Frigidaire 
Surllni 



Stand Brands 



Arthur Godfrey 

Gen Mills alt 



lay, Mon-Fri. Til 
ollowing spor 



Capt. Kangaroo 



Concentration 



Peter Lind Haye: 



Peter Lind Hayes 



Concentration 



Capt. Kangaro 

Gen Mills 



Peter Lind Hayes 



Tic Tac Dough 

alt Heinz 
PAG 



Tic Tac Dou^h 



Peter Lind Haye; 



True Sttry 
Sterling Dnif 



It Could Be You 



It Could Be Yoi 



No net service 



No net service 



Lone Ranger 

Gen Mills 
alt Nestle 



Howard Miller 



As the World 
PAG 



As the World 



Howard Miller 



Lucky Partners 



y Dean Show 
m & Johnson 



Jimmy Dean Show 



Lucky Partners 



Lucky Partners 



No net service 



Haggis Baggii 

Brillo alt susl 



Art Linkletter 



Today Is Ours 



Beat The Clock 



From These Root 



Who Do You 

Trust? 



From These Root 



NCAA Football 
Bayuk Cigars 



Verdict Is Yours 



From These Roo s 



All-star Coif 

Miller Brew 
Beynolds Metal 



Mickey Mouse 

Club 

Gen Mills 



grams not listed are: Tonight, NBC, 11:15 p.m.-l:00 
a.m., Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday 
News Special, CBS, Sunday, 11-11:15 p.m. (Carter and 
Whitehall); Today, NBC. 7:00-9:00 a.m., Monday-Friday, 
participating; News CBS, 7:45-8:00 a.m. and 8:45-9:00 
a.m., Monday-Friday. 



All times are Eastern Daylight. Participating sponsors 
are not listed because in many cases they fluctuate. 

Sponsors, co-sponsors and alternate-week sponsors are 
shown along with names of programs. Alphabetical index 
of nighttime programs, together with show costs, sponsors 
and agencies starts on page 46. 



In the face of today's changing concepts^ SPONSOR ASKS; 

What is the place 

of the regional network |i 



Asi regional networks play a more 
important role in ad strategy, a 
station man and two representa- 
tives review the regionals' function 

F. Proctor Jones, national sales mgr.. 
The Yankee Network. WNAC & IT \.4CTf 






To juim 

a basic 
marketing 



The rejiional radio networks were born 
of a basic marketing need which exists 
identically today. The Yankee Net- 
work came into being on October 12. 
1958, when the first permanent tele- 
phone lines were installed between 
W'NAC in Boston and WEAN in Provi- 
dence, New England's first and second 
markets. Today. Yankee with its 
50.000 watt flagship station, WNAC 
680 kc in Boston, and its 30 affiliated 
"hometown" stations, brings 95% of 
the population of this strategic six-state 
area within the hearing and persuasive- 
ness of the only advertising medium 
delivering a simultaneous controlled 
impression throughout the region. 

The "place of regional networks" is 
rightfully influenced by the prolific 
needs of the advertisers; it always has 
been, and regionals will survive and 
thrive only so long as they continue to 
fulfill this need. This basic need is 
summed up in the marketing peculiari- 
ties that exist in most categories of 
enterprise that produce consumer 
goods or services, and in the degree 
of the desire of these enterprises to 
localize or personalize their approach 
to the consumer. The following situa- 
tions are cases in point: If the manu- 
facturer wishes to devote extra support 
to his best sales area, or wishes to 
bolster a lagging sales area; a drug 
products advertiser must capitalize on 
seasonal extremes of weather; an auto- 
motive con* ern has a dealer problem; 



a national concern is introducing a 
new product on a staggered states 
basis; a corporation wishes to attract 
a migration of skilled labor types into 
its manufacturing location; a regional 
distributor needs a basic program in a 
single territory; a "foreign" company 
sees advantage in associating its name 
with a medium which enjoys long- 
term, high-grade local acceptance. 

The 1 ankee Network provides "serv- 
ice-type" programing, leaving its affili- 
ates to cultivate local tastes and atti- 
tudes. Yankee sticks to news, weather, 
women's programing: it provides the 
physical facilities for a selected few 
additional programs of special interest, 
such as reliuious. |iul)lic service, spe- 
cial event- ami -pml-. 

The Yarikt-e \elu..rk News, New 
England's first and still the only com- 
plete regional news service, is typical 
of the tool the Yankee Network pro- 
vides advertisers for their marketing 
needs. Yankee originates six daily 
newscasts of 15-minutes length which 
are aired simultaneously thoughout the 
31 primary and secondary affiliated 
localities. The first 10 minutes is de- 
livered from key station WNAC in 
Boston and contains international, na- 
tional and regional news, plus regional 
weather headlines. At the 10-minute 
point, each affiliated Yankee station 
cuts away from the network lines and 
individually follows with five adjacent 
minutes of local news and local 
weather. Thus Yankee acts as area 
spokesman, employs important pro- 
graming resources and provides a 
major regional advertising vehicle. 

Regional Yankee was a success from 
the start and has forged strongly ahead 
through the years, even through the 
early Fifties, but it has never experi- 
enced such increasing business health 
as each passing week and year brings. 
The newest advertiser concept of the 
use of regional radio has evolved the 
horizontal saturation of announcement 
frequency added to the vertical satura- 
tion already existing in affiliate clear- 
ances. Through this concept the 
Yankee Network — with its same basic 



programing and same basic purposes 
— is bounding ahead and prospering 
for the reason for which it was 
founded: as a special advertising tool 
to fill a special marketing need. 

Dick O'Connell, pres.. Richard O'Con- 
nell. Inc., reinesenting The Sombrero Net- 
work, The Lobster Network 




\\< l.< I III. i.-.i..iiai network has a 
definite place in today's radio pro- 
vided it is geared for today's radio 
from either a programing and/or cost 
point of view. To hold its place in the 
sun accordingly, today's regional net- 
work must serve a definite need in the 
new radio. Covering either a specific 
market or a specific area, or both, con- 
stitutes the major prerequisite for 
attractive regional network operation. 
As examples of these prerequisites in 
action. The Sombrero Network in the 
Southwest covering top Latin Ameri- 
can-Spanish speaking markets serves a 
distinct purpose in channeling national 
clients' messages to a market best 
covered by native language broadcast- 
ing. On the other hand, the Lobster 
Network of Maine serves a direct 
purpose in dominant coverage of one 
entire area, in this case all of the state 
of Maine. 

Converseh . no regional network can 
be worth its salt if it forces upon an 
advertiser fringe markets from which 
the advertiser has little hope for gain. 
The fact that a network offers East 
Brushwood even at SOd a spot has no 
place in today's radio. 

We have recommended to both 
clients and station groups alike that 
they limit their scope to the donnnant 
coverage of an area important to the 
client. Toda\"s reaional network makes 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBEIR 1958 



:^day's radio? 



sense only if it offer? the kind of flexi- 
bility which todaj's national networks 
offer to the same client. The day of 
the "must buy" is dead. Having re- 
ceived an effectual funeral from the 
three national networks, as an example, 
in the case of Lobster, a client may 
buy any two, any three, any four sta- 
tions, etc. In the case of Sombrero 
which covers a variety of cities, the 
client is able to select markets most 
needed by him in terms of population, 
or in terms of sales district, whichever 
may be more important to him. Since 
today's radio is an extremely flexible 
medium, it demands that today's re- 
gional network be equally flexible, or 
more so, in order to create an atmos- 
phere attractive to today's national 
spot client. 

The rate structure of the regional 
network is equally important, and to 
be attractive, must be simple. The 
convenience of one billing can be in 
itself attractive to the agency and 
client alike. Co-ordinated merchandis- 
ing efforts and programing features 
are often important to client and net- 
work alike. In essence, however, the 
regional network must be constructed 
on a base of strong affiliates. We, also 
recommend the discontinuance of the 
"Bonus Station Idea." Most buyers 
realize that a bonus station is a poor 
station. Thus, the word "bonus" is 
indeed a misnomer. Geared to today's 
needs, the regional network can look 
forward to a very successful tomorrow. 

John J. Tormey, director of radio sales, 
Avery-Knodel, Inc., Neiv York 




It depends u|)()n the regional network. 

ActualK . the regional network has two 

i Please turn to page 74) 



NOT JUST ROCK 'N ROLL... the /act is 

K-NUZ 
,. NO. 1* 

WITH THE 

I ADULT 

§ HOUSTON AUDIENCE! 

' K-NUZ 

delivers the largest 

POWER' 




Purchasing 



or Adult Speridable Income 
Audience in the Houston Market! 



Special PULSE SURVEY (Apr.-May, 1958) pro 
livers fhe largest audience with spendable incomi 
power in Houston. 



s K-NUZ de- 
)r purchasing 



•X'i* NIELSEN (June, 1958) proves K-NUZ has the largest adult 
''•'.''•''• audience from 6 A.M. to 6 P.M. Monday thru Friday. 



Sand for a Copy of SPECIAL PULSE (Purchasing Pay 
livered by Houston Radio Sfafions— Apr.-May, 19S8). 



TO REACH THE PEOPLE WHO BUY IN HOUSTON 

..aat.. ix's K-NUZ— 

I STILL THE LOWEST COST 
PER THOUSAND BUY! 




IfiNUZ 

/ Houston's^ 24-Hour \ 
^- — ^ Music a^idTJews- / 



National Reps.: 

Forjoe & Co. — 

New York • Chicago 

Los Angeles • San Francisco 

Philadelphia • Seattle 

Southern Reps.: 
CLARKE BROWN CO. 

Dallas • New Orleans • Aflanfa 

In Houston: 

Call Dave Morris 

JA 3-2581 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



— -"^ — "TZ^'' "'''' 

. X States ot t^'^" , ,o\diets- 
i „ .. Nvat ^1^"^ V -^ IS at 



m-o^ ■'''''' ■ sounded. -^^ - ''^ 

r^iw-rt^ar.^^^^^^^ 

^°- ^" ' :Jeltotc e^V^-^^t v^^^^^^ *'"'f 

•tntutoV^-'^^^t.nseanAt^^ 
pepatttnent 



(,/■ 



Army- 



-ggmiP^^TTVve wote tban ^ ^,^ 

/ Cn VXt>J^f,^o%00 teVattves an 



ll 



lltlSillL 




^/Kt/iD/ CO to TO SUCH BLUE-CHIP ADVERTISERS AS . 
Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company . Conoco Oil Compan'y" 

and in addilio 



• Midland Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 



WNBO Chicago 

WHDH Boston 

WISN Milwaukee 

WTIC Hartford 


WTCN Minneopolis 
WIWI Indianopoli's 
WCKT Miami 


KONO 
WTAE P 
WBAL B 


allimore 


KLZ Denver 
KLOR Salt Lake 


City 


WFAA Dolloi 


WTOP 


iVoshinglon 


KOLD Tucson 




KX,, ..^ 


' ■'' ■'"'-^°|I° 


WBRE V 
KTTV to 


ViUcs-Borr,. 


KPHO Phoenix 
KFRE Fresno 





-L!;^-l'.>j.-itL-^xttfr:.,. ^... I.' V ,• . i.'^ii 




Marketing tools, trends, 
research data and trade tips 



FILM-SCOPE 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 

C«pyrltht l»58 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



(iranling that station managers are most sensitive to attitudes of advertisers 
on the local front, syndication should build a lot of prestige for itself this season. 

FILM-SCOPE asked its station spotters: "What are the trends in syndication for the 
1958-59 season?" and the prestige angle played a prominent part in their answers. 
Here's what some of ihem also noted: 

• Local competition and pride in programing good syndication half-hours has never heen 
greater, with a lot more good available half-hours to heighten this competition and pride. 

• Prices, at the same time, have come down. Also making it a buyers' market is the stress 
thai stations are putting on daytime programing;, features and off-network stripping material. 

• Full sponsorships of syndicated shows continue on the decline, but partial buys into 
such series by leading national advertisers are increasing. 



By the time Sunoco (Esly) finishes its syndication buying this fall, it will be 
in upwards of 50 markets in its 24-state marketing area. 

Esty is following the same pattern in buying for Sunoco that it does for Reynolds: A 
different program in each market, based on a good time slot. 
It's the fust year of syndication for Sunoco. 



Don't be surprised if those two new shows of the ""fantastic," or occult, school 
end up in syndication. 

Both Official's Invisible Man and Ziv's Woild of Giants have been bumped from network 
schedules this fall, and there's a good chance of they're being syndicated. 
If so, it'll be the first of its kind in syndi ation. 



Colonial Stores (Liller, Neal & Battle), largest southern regional film buyer, 
may <lrop syndication when its commitments are up in November. 

The food retailer currently has CBS Film's Gray Ghost in 13 Markets. But there won't 
l>e a second production year on Gray Ghost; consequently the compan\ is considering spots 
in all its 30 markets. 

Reason is two-fold: (ll Colonial wants to move more heavily into daytime, and (2) the 
cooperative money needed from suppliers for half-hour film sponsorship is hard to come b\. 



Drewery's Ltd. (MacFarland, Aveyard) has bought New York Confidential 
(TPA) as a replacement for Ziv's Target in 13 midwestern markets. 

Contracts are for 52 weeks and the station list will be the same as for Target. 



Another Nestle product will be making its way into syndication this fall. 

It's Nestle's Quik. via McCann-Erickson, which will be spotting Roy Rogers across the 
country in 30 markets where Lone Ranger (on CBS TV I needs support. Heaviest concentra- 
tion will be in the southeast. 

Only other Nestle product to use syndication has been DeCafe (Bryan Houston). 



27 SEPTEMBER 195!; 



Key trends and developments 
in marketing and research 



^ MARKETING WEEK 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 If Gillette goes national with spot radio — and it looks like it will — it will pre- 

'ONSoR^uBLicATMONS INC. Sent an interesting switch on how to reach the shaving market. 

Electric shavers, Gillette's prime competition, didn't get an)\vhere until tv came on the 
scene. 

Gillette's been testing d.j.'s for more than tlu-ee years to measure their impact on 
the teen-age market. 

Few people remember, but Gillette marketed an electric shaver during the SO's. 

It was dropped when the firm went into war work and not revived. 

Whether or not Gillette regrets its failure to revive its shaver, the fact remains that the 
safety razor market is not expanding. Sales are not down but, with the population ex- 
panding so rapidly, the net result is a loss in share of the shaving business. 



Weiss & Geller has begun a policy of providing its account executives with 
more marketing know-how. 

The job is being undertaken by Robert Breckenridge, v.p. and marketing director of the 
agency's three-man department. 

Ideally, Breckenridge says, an agency the size of Weiss & Geller should provide most 
of its marketing services through account men. 



Increasing expenditures for merchandising in recent years has made it essential to in- 
sure greater cooperation among retailers. 

Yet, time after time, promotions get support in no more than 15% of the target 
stores. 

So reports Donald W. White, president of Don White, Inc. On the other hand, White 
said, in addressing the Merchandising Executives Club of New York recently, it is com- 
mon for mass product displays to increase store sales 100% and more. 

White estimates that $2 billion a year is now being spent on merchandising. He said 
that one firm, reported as laying out $6.5 million for consumer media, is putting an addition- 
al $2 million into merchandising. (White didn't mention the firm but other sources said 
he was referring to Camel cigarettes.) 

As another example of heavy merchandising expenses, White noted that General Foods 
recently spent $75,000 just on the printing costs of one display piece. 

White's firm has developed a method of measuring, on a regular basis, the 
amount of promotion support a brand gets in stores. The index provides competitive 
data as well as regional breakdowns. 

Growing interest in measuring advertising effectiveness has led to a workshop 
seminar on the subject, held by Management Institute of New York University in New York 
City. 

The eight-session course, beginning 29 September, will be coordinated by William 
Capitman, president. Center for Research in Marketing. 

SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBKR 1958 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



Copyright l»58 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 The daytime radio stations not only lo§t their case for longer operating hours, 

they "lost it big." 

The daytime-only stations, limited to the hours between sunrise and sunset, sought fixed 
hours between 5 a.m. and 7 p.m. During the late fall and winter months this would have 
caused interference to full time stations during the added hours. 

After more than ten years of failing to get an answer from the FCC, these stations ap- 
pealed to the Senate Small Business Committee. Chairman Wayne Morse (D., Ore.) held 
hearings, told the FCC he was not judging the merits, but demanded a quick decision on the 
petition. 

The daytimers got a decision, but not the one they wanted. The FCC, in a unanimous 
vote with only Chairman Doerfer absent, adopted without exception all of the arguments 
ranged against the proposal. These had been lodged by the Clear Channel Broadcasting Serv- 
ice, and over 240 full-time stations, large and small. 

Among the anti arguments adopted in toto by the FCC: 

• The daytimers during the added hours would, themselves, be able to reach only a frac- 
tion of their daytime audiences because of interference. 

• While more than 900 communities would get local service in the added hours, over half 
of these are already receiving service from nearby full-time stations, or are suburbs served by 
the main community. 

• Grant of the petition would prejudge the intertwined clear channel and daytime skywave 
cases. Denial wouldn't. 

• For only 138 full-time stations, figures showed 94,591,111 people would lose radio service. 

• People do listen to far-away stations, contrary to daytimer claims. Also many 
full-timers gear programing to outlying communities and rural areas. 

The significance of the decision is more in its emphatic nature than in the conclusion it 
reached. The simple fact is that the daytimers now have nowhere to go. 

Court appeal would be futile, since the courts hold this type of decision is re- 
served for an expert government agency. 

And it is hardly likely that any Congressional committee would care to tackle so 
sweeping a decision. 

The report on the Senate Commerce Committee's various probes into tv may 
be moving closer to its release date. 

Nick Zapple is due in Washington for conferences with special counsel Kenneth Cox and 
committee chairman Warren Magnuson on the reports. 

None of which means the report actually will be released before January, but Zapple 
and Cox will be doing much to get it in shape for submission to committee members. 

The Miami channel 10 hearings droned along before special FCC hearing ex- 
aminer Horace Stern, with little new being added to the revelations before the 
House Legislative Oversight subcommittee. 

For instance, the financial dealings between Thurman Whiteside and former FCC commis- 
sioner Richard A. Mack became no clearer with repetition. 

What did appear clearer was that National Airlines, holder of the Miami licenses under 
attack, sought Whiteside's go-between services because of his friendship with Mack. And that 
the competing applicant. Col. A. Frank Katzentine, had pulled as many strings as he could 
find dangling. 

SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 59 




A round-up of trade talks, 
trends and tips for admen 



^ SPONSOR HEARS 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 Srllors of radio have plans for iuulgiii«; P&Ci back into the fohl on a sizable 

CpyTl.hf 1958 , 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC ^'»'c. 

NBC Radio, for instance, is working on a big presentation that it proposes to 
pitch to P&G's top level when the time seems ripe. (See also page 35.) 



That 15% agency commission on show packages continues to stimulate nee- 
dling on the part of network advertisers. 

One major agency, after being pressed on the issue, now has agreed to spend 
a goodly chunk of the program commission on researching the effectiveness of the 
client's commercials. 



General Foods' Edwin Ebel is reporteil scouting around among GF's product man- 
agers for somebody to help support the Person to Person show. 

Seems that after Ebel made the buy, the SOS product manager said he didn't re- 
call agreeing to get in on it. 

There's a lot of jockeying for network-affiliate strength going on among tv sta- 
tions in Michigan, especially the eastern part. 

So revamped coverage pictures for th^ networks may be coming up. 
Ancillary effect: Spot buyers are keeping a sharp lookout on the situation. 



In noting the more favorable attitude at McCann-Erickson toward radio, the 20 

September SPONSOR-SCOPE overlooked a key personality involved. 

He's Tom McAvity, the agency's recently installed programing strategist, whose in- 
timacy with radio dates back to the mid-30s when he was at Lord & Thomas I now Foote, 
Cone & Belding). 

ABC TV apparently has a problem of discipline with the exploitation experts 

it imported from the motion picture field for Operation Daybreak. 

These rugged operators are accustomed to taking over completely and running with 
the ball when they get into a town. Station people are accustomed to much decorum and 
assurances that they aren't losing control. 

Joe Culligan isn't the only one who's coining phrases to dramatize radio. 

His competitors (who deem the deejay as the salesman par excellence) are pushing 
this one: Excitement Radio. 

Their definition: It's something the deejay creates when he presents his sponsor's 
message. 

Marketing men cite Lever as a classic example of a company that creates com- 
petition for itself by manufacturing products for private labels. 

One product in point is Spry. The Lever plant which turns out this shortening devotes 
about half of its entire output to private labels. 

This underselling situation, as abetted by the Lever empire, has been a long- 
time irritant for P&G— even though its Crisco brand has a dominant share of the market. 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMIiKf< 1958 



^ 




\ 



Nothing else like it 
in Greater New Yorl( 

NOTHING APPROACHES THE SOUND: 

WVNJ originated the programming concept of Great 
Albums of Music. It is the only radio station in the m""etro- 
politan area that plays just Great Albums of Music from 
sign on to sign off every single day of the year. 

NOTHING APPROACHES THE AUDIENCE: 

The very nature of the music makes the audience pre- 
ponderantly adult. It's a rich audience, too. In one of the 
wealthiest counties of America (Essex — with its million 
plus population) WVNJ is first in 27 out of 34 rated periods 
from 7 AM till midnight. It is tied for first in three more. 
According to Pulse it has more listeners here than any 
station in New Jersey and New York as well. 




z 





i 



every time buyer 
reads 

SPONSOR ' 



^ar^^ 



of* 



^ 



BUT FOR EVERY TIMEBUYER 
THERE ARE TEN OTHER DECISION 
MAKERS BEHIND THE SCENES 
WHO READ SPONSOR AS WELL 



Rarely indeed does one man alone determine when and 
where to place radio or TV business. That's why 
it makes sense to reach every decision maker possible 
with your message because every voice that helps 
to finalize a sale should know your story. 

It's the chief reason your advertising will do so 

well in SPONSOR. SPONSOR reaches almost everybody 

who is anybody in air. All the timebuyers, of course, 

but more decision makers, too, at every level (in 

both the agency/advertiser category) than any 

other broadcast publication. 

Proof? 

Fair enough! 

SPONSOR is the only broadcast publication that 
offers a complete circulation breakdown BY JOB 
CLASSIFICATIONS— listing the exact number of 
subscribers (with their names and titles) at every 
management level. We'll be happy to show it to you 
at your convenience and prove beyond doubt that 
SPONSOR reaches more teams that buy time than any other 
book in the field. 



SR0IM30R 

sells the TEAM that buys the TIME 



NEWS & IDEA 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Contadina Foods has gone on a 
big spot radio splurge in 27 cities. 

It is an eight-week campaign consist- 
ing of more than 11.000 commercials 
with frequencies running as high as 
180 per week in key cities such as New 
York. Chicago. Philadelphia. Detroit 
and San Francisco. 

Contadina will also employ spot tv 
in New York, with 360 one-minute 
announcements scheduled during the 
eight week period. 

Agency: Cunningham & Walsh. San 
Francisco. 



Other campaigns: 

• Zenith Radio will sponsor what 
it believes to be the first tv news pro- 
gram produced especially for the hard 
of hearing, via WNBQ. Chicago. Agen- 
cy for the hearing aids: MacFarland 
Aveyard & Co. 

• Ray-O-Vac is using nation wide 
spot radio on 129 stations to advertise 
its flashlights and batteries in a cam- 
paign to run for 23 weeks. Agency: 
H. Monk and Associates. 

• Mother's Cake & Cookie., Oak- 
land. Cal., has started its one-minute 
spot radio campaign in three major 
markets: Los Angeles (478 spots I ; San 
Francisco 1 465 spots i and Phoenix 



( 430 spots I . all for 13 weeks. Agency : 
Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli, San Fran- 
cisco. 

• Bulova Watch has added three 
more network tv shows to its list of 
buys for the fall, all on NBC TV: To- 
day, The Jack Paar Show and News 
with Huntley and Brinkley. These pur- 
chases augment Bulova's record ad 
campaign for Christmas. 

• Appearing on tv for the first time. 
Wagner Baking Corp., Newark, 
starts this week, for an initial 52-week 
program of ten 10-second spots per 
week via WRCA-TV, New York. Agen- 
cy: L. H. Hartman Co. 

• Ronzoni Macaroni has upped 
its fall ad budget 18% over last year, 
via tv programs on WRCA-TV. New 
York; WRCV-TV. Philadelphia: and 
WNHC-TV, New Haven. On Radio. 
Ronzoni will use one-minute and 20- 
second spots on news programs on 10 
radio stations in New York, Philadel- 
phia. Boston, Providence, New Haven 
and New Britain. Agency: Emil Mogul. 

• Dipsy Doodles, a new fun-food 




PICTURE 
WRAP-UP 



Clie 



liid star: (I t 



& Walsh; Ben Halsell ad <ln P 

v.p., C&W; Tom Harmon, -\i i 

die; W. B. Hawke, gen si- i.._r I m 

Radio; Gordon F. Hayes, g< n ni^r ( 

Humphrey, radio/tv ae, C&W at impromptu gtt together i 

Texaco star Harmon wa- East to meet ^\lth Prf-ident Ei'< 



M \ p ( unnwvhdm 
1 lu nd Mdhon.N 
,11 I ( 1!^ Patifu Ra 
I - Duiuh- X p (Bs 
I) "^pot ^dle*.. Hank 




N \ 




Gening together at Hidden \ alley meetinj: ot Mulii-a 
Assn. are (1 to r> convention chairman John Ponieroy, Wll 
Lansing; 1958 president Martin Giaimo. WJEF, Grand Rapi.l 
Art Swift. WOOD-T\ . Grand Rapids; Leo Burnett's Tom ^Xri;:! 
Jr.; and Clyde Vortman of Zimmer, Keller & Calvert. D-li. 

Silence reigns after 96 hours 36 minutes during which Mi 
Charles Cook broke the existing "talkathon" record. Here -I 
receives a check for $1,000 from Mr. Lyell Bremser, vice presidn 
of KFAB, Omaha, .'^he talked from 2 September to 6 Sept.nil" 







in 



snack by Old London begins its cam- 
paign this week, to last through the 
end of this year. Spot tv announce- 
ments will appear on Popeye, carried 
by WPIX, WNEW-TV and WABC-TV, 
all New York. Agency: Richard K. 
Manoff. 

• Lite Diet special-formula white 
bread also begins its three month drive 
this week with a budget in excess of 
$200,000, via 150 radio stations and 
30 tv stations. Agency: Emil Mogul. 

Ideas at work: A Rockford, 111. tv 
and Hi-Fi dealer, C. E. T., staged a 
novel promotion in launching a new 
store manager — Elmer Knispel. A one- 
week teaser campaign using radio, tv 
and print, at a cost of a little more 
than $1,000, centered around: "Who's 
Elmer: Where's Elmer; Elmer's Com- 
ing and Elmer Has A Surprise." 
Other promotions: Wilson & Co. 
is starting its third year with the Mrs. 
America promotion, designed to gen- 
erate impact at the retail level. Wilson 
feels that anything they can do to 



glorify the American housewife, can 
help promote the Wilson label. The 
Mrs. America winner makes personal 
appearances in retail stores, providing 
many opportunities for merchandising, 
in-store displays, etc., and featured dis- 
plays of Wilson brands during the 
visit. Wilson also uses local radio and 
tv promotions during the time of Mrs. 
America visits. 

Another midwest promotion: John- 
son's Wax, of Racine, Wise, is doing 
a real razzle-dazzle down in New Or- 
leans this weekend in conjunction with 
CBS TV on the premier of their Der- 
ringer Show. NL&B, the Chicago agen- 
cy is handling this one, which will 
include civic welcome and reception of 
the show's stars, appearances on tv 
and radio, plus the screening of the 
premier program aboard the Mississip- 
pi river boat as it cruises up and down 
the river. 

Strictly personnel: Joseph Lynch 

named advertising and sales promo- 
tion manager for the Westinghouse's 



electronic tube division . . . Roger 
Drew, appointed assistant to James 
Shallow, general manager-merchandis- 
ing at Philco Corp. . . . Frederick 
Fleischman, Jr., to the newly created 
post of administrator of marketing de- 
partment, and John Bannon, adver- 
tising manager, for Pepsi-Cola Inter- 
national. 

AGENCIES 

Highlights of the 4 A's Central 
Region 2l8t annual meeting in 
Chicago 10 October will be a 
workshop on "Organization of Tv- 
Radio Functions in Advertising 
Agencies." 

Peter J. Cavollo, D'Arcy, will be 
chairman. Panelists: Arthur Lund, 
Campbell-Mithun; Louis Tilden, Wher- 
ry, Baker & Tilden; Ira Rubel, Ira 
Rubel; and John White, McCann- 
Erickson. 

The quick pace of agency turn- 
over continues. Latest account shifts 
include: 




1 land anywhere" was judges' decision so 

uniye Cold became "Miss Helicopter— 1958," 

to whirlybirds everywhere. She arrived via 

U |licopter at WVTV, Tampa studios to head- 

fThirly bird's premiere on station's airwaves 




lately Club ^shich Wilso 



■ N.Lnid. star Big Wilson lea,!- J",!) „|„|i ,,,,1 i, 
lull (louiUciwii -tri'cts on wheeled demoii-tidlKni Im the ^ 
1 organized. Club works closely with Police Dept. for safe i 



Upcoming Ad Week campaign is planned by (1 to r) C. James Proud, AFA pres.; Mrs. 
Claire Drew Forhe'^. Ad A'^sn. of the West; Ad Week Natl. Chmn., Arthur H. Motley; Ad 
WiTk M,,. , hniiK ,|nh„ I'. Cunniniiliam: AFA Board Chmn. R. M. Feemster; John Flagg, B&B 




DuBarry (iosnietics and Sports- 
man Men's Toiletries, products of 
Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co.. 
to Lambert & Feasle\ . from NC&K . . . 
Mission of California, a division of 
Cutt Beverajie Co.. joins Cott at Dowd, 
Redfield and Johnstone, bringing the 
total account to $1 million with 75% 
going to back the Cott drinks . 
Magic Chef gas ranges, joins its par- 
ent CO.. Dixie Products, at D'Arcy . . 
Emerson Radio to Friend-Reiss . . 
Manhattan Coffee, to Rutledge 
Lilienfeld. handlers of the company 
other product. Dining Car Coffee . . . 
Quickee Products, Inc., Yonkers, to 
Schneider-Stogel Co., New York . . . 
Aluminum Co. of America's Alcoa 
Closure division, to Ketchum, Mac- 
Leod & Grove . . . Aldon Industries, 
New York, to Cayton, Inc., New York, 
with plans for a tv spot campaign in 
major markets to begin this week. 

Top honors: Radio commercials by 
Leo Burnett for the National Tea 

Council made top-score in the current 
Spot Radio Commercial survev by 
John Blair & Co. 

Other winners: Tetley Tea, Ogilvy 



Benson & Mather; Winston, Esty; 
Pepsi-Cola. K&E: Budweiser, D'Arcy 
and Slug-a-Bug, Wesley Associates. 

Agency affiliation: Heintz & Co. 
and Roy S. Durstine jointly an- 
nounced an affiliation that will permit 
both California agencies to retain their 
individual identity, but will affect a 
consolidation of their agency facilities 
in San Francisco. 

Combined billing of their joint San 
Francisco office: 83.5 million. 

They hecame v.p.'s: David Stew- 
art, named executive v. p. of K&E. and 
George Fry has been put in charge 
of the account section. Donald Miler, 
senior v.p. and director of K&E re- 
signed this week. Reason: "basic dis- 
agreement on agency operating poli- 
cies." . . . Leonard Colson joins 
Warwick & Legler as v.p. and member 
of the plans board . . . Frank Bair, 
elected a v.p. and John Chapin, added 
to the board of directors of Clark & 
Robertz, Detroit. 

Other agency personnel moves: 
Armella Selsor, promoted to assist- 



ant media director and Elaine Pap- 
pas, to media buyer, at North Adver- 
tising, Chicago . . . Edward Simon. 
director of research, Ross Roy, De- 
troit . . . Jerome Delott and David | 
Mackintosh, to the New York oflSce i 
of DFS as research project directors 
. . . George Goodlett, to Foote, Cone 
& Belding as account executive . . . 
Frank Ennis, account executive at 
Lambert & Feasley . . . Richard Ja- 
cobs joins Noble-Dury & Associate- 
Memphis . . . Harriet Benton, tu 
copy chief at Ray Barron, Inc., Boston 
. . . Mort Reiner, to the radio/tv de- 
partment of Hicks & Greist as group 
time buyer . . . Edmund Anderson 
and John McDonald, to the New 
York office of DFS. 

ASSOCIATIONS 

Broadcasters must work together 
to ward off attempts to hamstring ! 
the industry. 

So warned Harold E. Fellows, 

NAB president, addressing broadcast- 
ers from the South at the NAB Fall , 
Conference at Biloxi, Miss. 

"We have yet to face some of the i 





I mi ■ ■ 




^JmAa Ut WtAA^^ - coordinates with 

McClotchy newspapers for complete, up-to-the-minute 

coverage. Sound and silent film cameras give 24-hour 

coverage of local events. Has No. 1 rated news program.* 



KMJ-TV • FRESNO, CALIFORNIA • McCLATCHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 



The Katz Agency, 
National Representative 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



most intense legislative problems that 
have confronted this industry," Fellows 
continued. 

Included in this group of problems: 
I pay tv, community antennas, network 
regulation, and advertising control. 

Other developments at the NAB: 

1) The tv p.r. committee adopted 
a plan for a series of 10-second ani- 
mated spots to show the public the im- 
pact of tv in American life. 

2) It filed a petition with the FCC 
opposing rate increases on news tele- 
type facilities, claiming that increased 
wire rates would curtail news trans- 

, mission. 

TvB is continuing its program of 
pin-pointing industry-wide suc- 
cessful uses of tv with its mailing, 
this week, on "How automobile deal- 
, ■ ers get more mileage with tv." 
, ; A kit, containing examples of every 
. ' car maker, will be sent to member 
j , stations. 

J Membership growing: 10 new mem- 
bers have joined the Broadcasters' 
' Promotion Association during Au- 
I gust, bringing the total of BPA's roster 
j to nearly 250. 

■ Here's a preview of the broadcast- 
i ers' calendar for the week: 
j 29-30 Sept.: NAB Fall Conference, 
j Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco. 
I I 3-5 Oct. : AWRT national board meet- 
' ; ing, Waldorf Astoria, New York. 

5-6 Oct.: Convention of Texas Assn. 

of Broadcasters, Texas Hotel, Ft. 

Worth. 
i 9-10 Oct.: Central 4A's regional an- 
j nual meeting, Drake Hotel, Chicago. 
1 9-10 Oct.: North Carolina Assn. of 

Broadcasters, Sedgefield Inn, Greens- 



! Main speakers at the second annual 
1 southwestern area conference o: 
t AWRT this weekend, in Ft. Worth in- 
clude: Earl Fletcher, KXOL, Ft. 
Worth; Montez Tjaden, KWTV, Ok 
lahoma City; Bobbye Hughes, Cain 
Agency, Dallas; Charles Ringler, 
Leonard's, Ft. Worth; Mike Shapiro, 
WFAA-TV, Dallas; and W. D Rog- 
ers, president and general manager of 
KDUB-TV, Lubbock, KPAR-TV. Abi- 
lene-Sweetwater, KEDY-TV, Big 
Spring, Tex. 



They were elected: F. C. Sowell, 

v.p. and general manager. WLAC, 



27 SEFTEMBER 1958 



Nashville, named head of the NAB 
AM Radio Committee . . . Joseph 
Floyd, president, KELO-TV, Sioux 
Falls, named chairmna of NAB's Tv 
Film committee . . . C. L. Thomas, 
v.p. and general manager, KXOX, St. 
Louis, to serve on the radio committee, 
NAB . . . James Quello, program 
manager, WJR. Detroit, named presi- 
dent of the Michigan Assn. of Broad- 
casters . . . Lester Frankel, of Audits 
& Surveys Co., Morton Vitriol, of 
Hiram Walker, and John Maloney, 
of Reader's Digest, elected directors of 
the American Marketing Association. 

FILM 

MCA added four more stations in 
three markets to its Paramount 
Library sales list this week. 

Stations buying parts of the package 
include WFBM-TV and WTTV, In- 
dianapolis; WTCN-TV, Minneapolis; 
and KUTV, Salt Lake City. 

The sales bring the total stations 
sold list to 16. 



Other sales: 

• Carling Brewing (Lang, Fish- 
er and Stashower) has renewed its 
sponsorship of Walt Schwimmer's 
Championship Bowling for the 
fifth year. Buy is for 22 markets. 

• The Whitehouse Company, 
distributors of 21 Top Tunes (Victor 
& Richards) has bought two Flamingo 
series for more than 75 markets. The 
series: Sailor of Fortune and Aggie. 

• WTAE-TV, Pittsburgh, this week 
bought 550 films in the MGM library. 
Price: $1.5 million. 

• Eleven stations were added to 
Screen Gems' Burns & Allen line-up 
this week, bringing the total market 
tally to 67. 

The new stations signed are WBBM- 
TV, Chicago; WROC-TV, Roches- 
ter; WCAU-TV, Philadelphia; 
WNCT-TV, Greenville; WSAU-TV, 
Wausau; KOOK-TV, Billings; 
WTCN-TV, Minneapolis; WMCT- 
TV, Memphis; WHC-TV, Pittsburgh; 
WLWA-TV, Atlanta; and WDAU- 
TV, Scranton. 



1 1 1 111 1 1 niiiiiiiiii 

YOUR BUSINESS WILL BE UP 

because you'll get more of it if you 

read SPONSOR'S new I2th annual 

FALL FACTS BASICS 

38 pages on Marketing with 15 pages of BASICS charts 

86 pages on Radio with 15 pages of BASICS charts 

78 pages on Television with 18 pages of BASICS charts 

17 pages on Film with four pages of BASICS charts 

Reprints of popular BASICS charts sections: 



16 pages on Marketing 

16 pages on Radio 

24 pages on Tv and Fill 



1 to 9 35 cents each 

10 to 49 25 cents each 

50 to 99 20 cents each 

100 to 499 15 cents each 

500 to 999 1214 cents each 

1,000 or more 10 cents each 
Prices include postage 



Readers' Service, SPONSOR, 40 E. 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Please send me the following reprints: 

Check or cash enclosed Bill me 

Marketing - — 

Radio 

Television-Film 



Unit price Total amount 



Full copy 


f Fall Facts 


BASICS-$1 

ComDanv 


Address 



• Another off-network series. ABC" 
Film's People's Choice, added 10 
markets. 

Included: WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee; 
\^'RCV-TV. Philadelphia: KPIX, San 
Francisco: WFIE-TV', Fvansville: 
WTVN-TV, Columbus: WPRO-TV, 
Providence: KQX, Boise; WDSU- 
TV, New Orleans: KNXT, Los An- 
geles; and the Park Bank on WATE- 
TV, Knoxville. 

On videotaping: Hal Roach Stu- 
dios an<l Guild Films have pacted 
a SI million, long-range agree- 
ment for the production and dis- 
tribution of videotape properties. 
Guild has etiuippL-d the Roa-h stu- 
dios with videotaping facilities: Guild 
will distribute the videotaped produc- 
tions. First propert\ under the pact 
will be Date With Judy. 

CNP's new syndicated series, Flight, 
has received the official endorsement 
of three top agencies, the Defense De- 
partment, the Air Force and the Air 
Force Association. 

Expansions: Two wholly-owned sub- 
sidiaries for the licensing and distrubu- 
tion of tv films abroad have been 
formed bv CBS. The two: CBS Eu- 
rope LTD., and CBS, Ltd Flam- 
ingo Telefilms has opened a new office 
in Atlanta, to handle sales on Citizen 
Soldier. 

In the foreign markets : Television 
Interamerica in South America has 
purchased 300 Warner films from AAP 
for tv release in Cuba. Pictures are 
scheduled on both Cuban tv networks 
... Six CNP series were sold this week 
in Canada through Freemantle Ltd. The 
six: Life of Riley, in 11 markets; 
Medic, in nine markets; It's a Great 
Life, in eight; and Gumby, The Ad- 
ventures of Hiram Holiday and Panic, 
all to the CBC. 

Strictlv personnel: Stan Smith, 

v.p. of Official Films, has been named 
head of the sales department. He re- 
places Ray Junkin, who resigned . . . 
Jerry Lee, to MCA-TV's western sales 
staff . . . C. Herbert Masse, named 
a((f)unt executive for upper New York 
and New England at ABC Films . . . 
Henry S. Newman, to Inter World 
TV Films as sales rep . . . William 
Fineshriber, foreign operations di- 
rector of Screen Gems, off this week 



on a three-month round-the-world sales 
junket. 

NETWORKS 

The tv networks are keeping un- 
der closed wraps what they'll be 
spending for spotlight ads to com- 
pete for the davtime audience this 
fall. 

Indications are that the battle on the 
daytime front will be much more in- 
tense, promotion-wise, than for the 
night-time audience. 

P.S. : However, if you are a day- 
time client, you can get this informa- 
tion from the network. 

Maverick stood up well last week- 
end against Jack Benny, Ed Sulli- 
van and Steve Allen. 

According to Trendex, in the 7:30-8 
period Maverick had a rating of 22.2 
compared with 19.0 for Benny. 

In the 8-8:30 slot, Maverick had 
23.1; Sullivan, 25.0 and Allen' 15.8. 

Network tv sales: Florida Citrus 
Commission, for $1.5 million on 
CBS TV . . . Gerber Products Co., 

for a weekly segment of the Jimmy 
Dean Show, ABC TV . . . Olin Math- 
ieson, to share the spotlight with Ren- 
ault Motors on Ed Murrow's Small 
World, CBS TV . . . P&G brings the 
total to 11 advertisers now signed to 
sponsor more than three-fourths of 
Mickey Mouse Club, ABC TV . . . Six 
advertisers, for NBC TV's Huntley- 
Brinkley News Report: Bristol-Myers; 
Nestle; National Carbon; Kemper In- 
surance; Bulova and Bell and Howell. 
Renewals totaling $1.8 million for 
the Jack Paar Show, placed with NBC 
TV by Bristol-Myers and Polaroid. 

Network radio sales: Forty-one ad- 
vertisers are launching new campaigns 
on NBC during the last four months 
of 1958 — amounting to more than 
$5 million. Leading the list of pur- 
chases in the food category, with an 
order for more than $1 million, is 
Mogen David Wine. 

Some other clients: Morton Salt. 
General Foods, Lewis-Howe, Warner 
Lambert, Grove, Bristol-Myers, Buick. 
CMC Trucks, Dodge, Pepsi-Cola. Read- 
er's Digest, and Brown & Williamson. 

Network affiliations: WREX-TV. 
Rockford, to CBS TV . . . KLUB, Salt 
Lake City, to ABC Radio. 



Ad libs 
are fine liu 



It's a fact— quick quips, spo b 
ous gestures, are best caua 
film. Then you are In contj 
quick snip here ... a laugn 
lighted there— and you have 
ter show . . . one you can be 
of. That's because you see it 

x/nn <how it on fi/m, Whofs 

lore," yo 
time and st 
'hite— or co 
there's on Eastman Film for 



For complete information w ; ! 
Motion Picture Film Depart - 
EASTMAN KODAK COM Vh 
Rochester 4, N. Y. 



W. J. German, lnc.| 



rt Lee, N. J.; Chicago, 
Hollywood, Calif. 



Be sure to shoot I 
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TIMEBUYERS 



TAKE 



NOTICE/ 



Look beyond the 

BIG RATINGS 

because 

big ratings do not necessarily pro- 
duce an audience with large pur- 
chasing power. 

YOUR BEST BUY IS A STATION 
THAT CATERS PRIMARILY TO AN 

Adult Audience 

ABLE TO BUY YOUR PRODUCT! 



WORL'S "950 Club" programming is 
directed first and foremost to an Adult 
Audience — with stress on music of the 
past, as well as music of the present and 
future!!! 



Statistics show that adult 
women spend 80% of the con- 
sumer dollar and influence 
up to 91% of the buying! 

WORL S 

AVERAGE: 889^6 ADULTS 

(PULSE, DAYTIME HOURS) 

THEREFORE YOUR BEST BUY 

IS 
Boston's "950 " CLUB Station 



WORL 



Strictly |iersoiinel: Charles God- 

Min has been named a v. p. of Mutual 
and placed in charge of all station ac- 
tivities. He'd previously been assistant 
to the president . . . Charles Kinsolv- 
ing, Jr., manager of plans develop- 
ment and Berry Rumple, manager 
of rates and affiliations. NBC. 

REPS 

John Blair is circulating a qualita- 
tive audience study it did in Dallas. 

The purpose was to find out what 
images listeners had of KLIF as com- 
pared to other local stations. 

How the image was arrived at: Ask- 
ing the interviewed to select the type 
of person most likely to listen to the 
various stations. 

The descriptive terms used: "mod- 
ern," "lively," "interesting" and "dull." 
Out of this came these factors: sta- 
tion's believability, vitality and general 
image. 

Among the objectives of the project: 
to show that the Blair Station's audi- 
ence was not significantly teenage. 

"An advertiser can control his ad- 
vertising with Spot Tv because it 
enables him to plan his advertis- 
ing to the selling job to be done 
in each local market." 

So said George Castleman, v. p. and 
new business development manager at 
PGW, to advertisers and agency peo- 
ple in Jacksonville, Atlanta and New 
Orleans last week. 

Purpose of Castleman's trip: to pre- 
sent a slide presentation, dubbed A 
Local Affair, telling ad and agency peo- 
ple the basis of spot tv. 

Moving to new quarters: For the 

third time in eight years, H-R Reps 
and H-R Tv, Inc. will be moving to 
new and larger offices: at the Seagram 
Building, 37.5 Park Avenue, New York. 

Rep appointments: John E. Pear- 
son Co., for WABJ, Adrian, Mich. . . . 
The Boiling Co., in the midwest and 
west coasts for WSUN-TV, Charleston, 
S. C. .. . Venard, Rintoul & Mc- 
Connel, for WKAB. Mobile . . . Eliz- 
abeth M. Breckjorden, for WLEX- 
TV, Lexington, Ky. ... J. A. Lucas 
& Associates, Los Angeles, for KTIX, 
Seattle, and KPER. Gilroy-Hollister, 
Cal. . . . Richard O'Connell, for 
WTVY, Dothan, Ala. and KLFY-TV, 
Lafayette, La. William J. Reilly will 
represent both stations in the Midwest 



Serving More 
Advertisers 

► ■< 

than any other 

Indiana* 
TV STATION 




it Except, of course. Indianapolis 



KOSI 

tEISMIIOI 




In Denver, impact in programming 
and commercial presentation assures 
KOSI advertisers a "cosy lead" in 
Denver sales. 

Every day more and more families are 
tuning to KOSI for music, news, and 
features with universal appeal. Talk 
to your Petry Man about the most 
dynamic selling force in Denver- 
radio station KOSI! 



KOSI 



5000 WaHs 
Denver is 

KOSI-iand! 



Give a "whistle" for your Petry Mon 



MId-AmerIca Broadcasting Co^ 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBliR 1958 



. . CBS Radio Spot Sales, for 
WBBM-FM. Chicago . . . The Boiling 
Co., for WEW, St. Louis and WKYB, 
Paducah, Ky. 

On the personnel front: Gale 
Blocki, Jr., co-founder of the dis- 
solved Simmons Associates, joins the 
BolHng Co. as sales manager of the 
Chicago office . . . Martin Percival 
and Bob Lewis, account executives in 
the New York office, radio division, 
Edward Petry & Co. . . . AUan Kla- 
mer, to the New York sales staff. Jack 
Masla & Co. 

RADIO STATIONS 

Radio has latched on to the hula- 
hoop craze as a promotion device. 

The Bartell Group will stage a 
championship match at the Grand In- 
ternational Hula-Hoop Olympics in Oc- 
tober. 

The nation-wide competition will 
send champions from each section of 
the country to San Francisco for a spin 
at the national title. 

Regional hula champs will be chosen 
in contest sponsored by KOBQ, San 
Diego; WOKY, Milwaukee; WDYE, 
Birmingham; WILD, Boston; WAKE, 
Atlanta and KYA, San Francisco. 

Grand prize: the winner will go to 
Hawaii — for hula lessons, naturally. 

Lanny Ross, radio d.j. and vocalist, 
becomes assistant to the general man- 
ager at WCBS, New York, 1 October. 
Along with his move into the man- 
agement rank of broadcasting Ross will 
continue with his radio show, heard 
daily in a new time period, 11:30- 
11:45 a.m. 

The NAB is looking into the edi- 
torializing trend. 

It's conducting a survey on editorial- 
izing by radio and tv stations. Pur- 
pose: to determine how and why sta- 
tions editorialize, or why they do not. 

Station Sales: WINN, Louisville, to 
Glenn A. Harmon (bringing his 16% 
that he previously owned to 45%; 
Oldham Clarke, French Eason (Chica 
go radio sales manager for H-R Reps) , 
Charles Wheeler and Jessee Chambers, 
for $266,500 plus relieve of indebted- 
ness of $74,000. 

An Arizona celebration: K-CUB, 

Tucson, put on an all-day rock 'n' roll 
session and a bear hunt last week, as 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 




it hecanie the newest nienibcr of the 
Gordon Group. 

Other stations in the group include: 
ViSAI-AM & FM. Cincinnati; K-BUZ, 
Phoenix; and KT\X-FM, Phoenix. 

IdeaB at Mork: 

• KFWB, Hollywood, has wrapped 
up its campaign for getting out the 
vote this November: Banners for auto 
bumpers, campaign buttons, and on- 
the-air promotions for the station's 
choice — Howdy Hooty. Letters of con- 
gratulations were sent to KFWB by 
Edmund Brown and William Know- 
land, the state's gubernatorial candi- 
dates. 

• WORD, Spartanburg, has 
launched its promotion via a "910 Or- 
bit" theme. Included, was a Walking 
Man asking folks if they heard the '910 
WORD' and models with placards stat- 
ing "I have nothing on but the 910 
WORD." Last week, the station aired 
for the entire day from a local Sears 
Roebuck parking lot, helping to boost 
the sales of cars. 

Thisa and Data: Bartell Family Ra- 
dio station WILD, Boston, reports its 
biggest upsurge of sales during Au- 




Enjoy sweet sales success from the 
Nation's 16th Television Market! Tele- 
vision Magazine credits the Charlotte- 
WBTV Market with 662,074 sets— 16th 
in the Nation — First in the South! Call 
CBS Television Spot Sales for a date! 




gust: 116 new accounts, more than 
doubling the number of advertisers 
the station had on the air the last week 
of July . . . Football note: For the 
first time, WPRO, Providence, will 
air all the Brown University football 
games, sponsored by the R. I. Hospital 
Trust Co. 

Station staffers: Harry W. Moore, 

Jr., promoted to radio sales manager, 
WTAR. Norfolk . . . Stan Edwards, 
sales manager, WTRY, Troy . . 
Thomas Moore, assistant to the sales 
manager, WBAL, Baltimore . . . Verne 
Nobles, publicity promotion manager, 
WJBK, Detroit . . . Edloie Van 
Camp, promoted to sales service man- 
ager, KBIG, Catalina . . . Herm 
Schneider, sales manager, WISN, 
Milwaukee . . . Chris Stolfa, named 
sales manager. KCMO-FM. Kansas 
City. 

Joseph K. Mikita, appointed to the 
newly- created post of controller for the 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. . . 
Lorence Press, named general man 
ager of the Allied Record division, 
A.merican Sound Corp. . . . Don Metz- 
ger, special events director and ac- 
count executive, K-ACE, Riverside, 
Cal. . . . Archie Grinalds, sales man 
ager, WDIA, Memphis . . . Warren 
Stout, national sales manager, KFAL, 
Fulton, Mo. . . . Joyce Tromblee, 
new traffic manager at KSO, Des 
Moines . . . James Murray, account 
executive, WAMP, Pittsburgh . . . 
Robert Boak, account executive, 
WEZE, Boston . . . Howard Lenzer, 
to the staff of WINE, Buffalo, as ac- 
count executive. 

TV STATIONS 

The great iconoclast is getting a 
stomach remedy. 

Ben Hechl, star of his own show 
via WABC-TV, New York, has signed 
three clients for it: Pepto-Bismal; 
Schifili Lace & Embroidery and the 
Wine Advisory Board. 

The show debuted last week, and 
airs each weekday night. 

> 
Directors, officers and managers of the 
Transcontinental Television Corp. 
held a series of meetings in New York 
last week, devised as a "working ses- 
sion" for the group. 

Transcontinent owns and operates 
WGR-AM-TV, Buffalo; WROC-TV, 
Rochester; part ownership in WNEP- 



TV, Wilkes-Barre-Scranton; and 50% ' 
owner of the Shenandoah Broadcast- 
ing Corp. (WSVA-AM-TV, Harrison- 
burg, Va.). 

Marie Hulbert, home economist at 
KOLN-TV, Lincoln, is in New York 
this week, as the only representative in 
our industry sitting on the judges 
panel for Pillsbury's 10th Grand Na- 
tional Bake-Off. 

Ideas at work : 

• To kick off its opening last week, 
WTAE, Pittsburgh, had pretty girls 
in the downtown area and all major i 
shopping centers hand out 15,000 small I 
bags containing four lollipops, for the ' 
new Channel 4. 

• James Gerity, Jr., president of 
WNEM-TV, Bay City, Mich., played 
host last week to more than 50 agen- 
cy, network, trade press and rep peo- 
ple in a tour of the station's market. 
The purpose of the promotion: to 
show- the guests the wide area WNEM- 
TV covers. 

Re educational tv: A "first" is 
claimed by WTVW, Evansville, as a 
commercial station being used for in- 
school educational tv on an area basis. | 
The station is telecasting six different ' 
courses in the regular curriculum of 
schools in 10 counties in southern 
Indiana. 

Anniversary: To celebrate its first 
year of telecasting, WFGA-TV, Jack- 
sonville, sent lead pencils to advertis- 
ers and agencies, with its call letters 
stamped on them. 

Strictly personnel: Russell Gohr- 
ing, promoted to general manager and I 
v.p. of WNEM-TV, Flint . . . Roy Ba- 
cus, named station manager, WBAP- 
TV, Ft. Worth ... Hal Biard, ex- 
ecutive assistant for programing and I 
production, KCOP, Hollywood . . . 
William Decker, director of tv sales, 
Stanley Brightwell, to the newly 
created post of film coordinator and 
Robert Lemon, named general ex- 
ecutive, WNBQ, Chicago . . . Gerard 
Roche, account executive, WNEP-TV, 
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre . . . Jim Man- 
ion, to the sales staff, WEHT-TV, 
Evansville . . . James Fly, Jr., ac- 
count executive for the NTA stations 
. . . Alan Simms, audience promo- 
tion supervisor and Bur Sienkiewicz, 
press information supervisor, WCAU- 
TV, Philadelphia. 



SPONSOR • 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



A 



iiother first in broadcast trade 



I publieatioo circulation analysis is 
made available hj SPONSOR with its 
audited breakdoivn of all subscribers 

M hj job titles.^ Siisi out of ten of all 

k I 

SPONSOR subscribers are in agencjr 

^1 and advertiser categories. 

SPONSOR 

The weekly magazine tv/radio advertisers use 



^Station managers and others 
interested in this breakdown of 
SPONSOR subscribers are in- 
vited to write SPONSOR-Job- 
Titles, 40 East 49 Street, New 
York 17. 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



SPONSOR ASKS 

[Cont'd from page 55 I 

responsibilities . . . first, to its affiliates 
and the audiences they serve; second, 
to its advertisers in securing for them 
a profitable sale of their products in 
volume through the use of the regional 
network's facilities. The regional 
network that deserves a place in 
today's radio should be geared to 
reach deep into the population it 
covers and actually "corner" potential 
buyers for the products of advertisers 
who use the network with commercial 
schedules of reasonable weight. 

Let us take the Inter-Mountain Radio 
Network, put it under the glass and 
see how it stacks up. IMN, is com- 
posed of 45 radio stations with signals 
that blanket a population of 4,238.900 
people residing in the States of Mon- 
tana. Idaho. Wyoming. Utah and 
Colorado. In addition to being avail- 
able at all times to counsel its affili- 
ates in their programing, promotion, 
merchandising and the many other 
functions by which a station strength- 
ens and enhances itself, IMN feeds 
national and regional news, sports and 
special events, plus other program- 



ing of vital interest to every family 
in the individual local conununities 
served by its affiliates. The network is. 
in effect, their ear to the outside world. 

On the commercial side, IMN de- 
rives advertising dollars for its affili- 
ates from accounts they would never 
reach and sell if compelled to pursue 
them on an individual station basis. 
Then, too, the affiliate is fed program- 
ing of outstanding adjacency value 
for local selling. In short, IMN, the 
regional network, is a source of 
strength to its affiliates, not a dead 
weight at the top using its station 
lineup as a crutch. 

In selling consumer products, many 
major manufacturers now think in 
terms of marketing patterns. Hereto- 
fore, the regional man had little to 
sav about the media selected, or the 
area the advertising was to cover. Not 
so today. 

District supervisors responsible for 
sales in the Inter-Mountain area today 
are IMN"s biggest boosters. They know 
that only through this network can 
thev reach Montana. Idaho. Wyoming, 
and Colorado. They are becoming 
aw are of the findings of ARF I March 
19581 which tell them that, of the 216 




counties in these five states reached in 
all the television stations in the area 
combined, 96 counties, or 44.4%, haM- 
less than .50' ( total household penetra- 
tion. 

They know, and are not satisfied 
with the fact, that regional products 
are achieving brand leadership by ex- 
ploiting the deep consumer reach of the 
Inter-Mountain Network while the na- 
tionally distributed products they han- 
dle are penalized by "penetration" 
assumed to be available through big 
signal stations carrying their schedules, 
but is not there. These men, whose 
livelihood and success depend on the 
public acceptance and sale of their 
products know the value of the market- 
by-market merchandising available in 
this vast area only through the Inter- 
Mountain Network and its affiliated 
stations. They know the value of the 
Inter-Mountain Concall which makes 
it possible for them to speak in person 
to retailers located in individual com- 
munity markets throughout this vast 
five state area as they sit relaxed in 
the conference room of the IMN outlet 
in their community. 

Yes, they know the power of Inter- 
Mountain. Today, these people are also 
seeing to it that their home offices knou 
and act accordingly. Result . . . Inter- 
Mountain sales January through Au- 
gust, 1958. up 58%. 

In appraising the position thi* 
regional network deserves in todax's 
radio and its value to advertisers usiiii; 
radio, it should be noted that in Den- 
ver, the flagship market of the entiiv 
territorv, IMN has an affiliate runninu 
close to the leader, in Salt Lake Cit\. 
the No. 2 market, the IMN station 
is far and away No. 1. IMN owns 
and operates five other stations in im- 
portant markets in the area. Each is 
rated first in audience delivered in its 
community. In 28 of the other markets 
delivered to the advertiser by Inter- 
Mountain Network the IMN affiliate is 
the only local radio voice in the com- 
munity. Obviously, they dominate the 
listening in their respective areas. 

That, as a regional network, IMN 
offers listeners the broadcast bill-of- 
fare thev want, is documented by their 
tune-in. The brand leaders it has built 
speaks well for its service to adver- 
tisers. The Inter-Mountain Network 
deserves a high place among regional 
networks in today's radio, and an ear- 
marked budget by manufacturers ad- 
vertising products distributed in tlii- 
area. ^ 



27 SEPTEMBKR 195.' 



IIME-BUYERS 
GOTTA 
BE 
TOUGH!" 



"eiiment's got no place in figuring the 
GT time-buy, buddy. When it comes to 
:tig the most for a cHent's dollar, give me 
b- the straight, most recent facts, I mean, 
ik the way I figure KFWB in the Los 
gi?s market is what I'm talking about. 
lo Radio on KFWB's Channel 98 is the 
id)f new, exciting radio that has pulled 
lei rs right in close. 

ol hard facts tell the story: as of July, 
K)i r shows KFWB as the NUMBER ONE 

' tid in the market . . . with a solid 95.5% 
in n share-of-audience. Nielsen is UP 
1' ... and Pulse is UP 37.1% ... all since 
11^ ry. 
■. uddy, here's one time-buyer who's quit 

. i ; stations strictly by ear ... or by 'tradi- 
1 The smart time-buyer will always buy 
V|J . . . first in Los Angeles. It's the thing 



\t^ 



write for your copy of 
tfiUed brochure: "TIME- 
G FOR FUN AND PRO- 
oaded with lots of handy 
hich make it easy to buy 
aior adio. 





ARB 

I Con/rf/rom page 38 j 

of every random sample either refuse 
lo bother or give up midway through; 
but a 60% careful return on a proba- 
[ bility sample of more than 300 fami- 
lies is still a good indication of how 
things are going in the tv corner. 

As for diarists giving up halfway 
through a week, such things happen. 
The most memorable such happening 
a diary faithfully kept up for five 
days. The pages for the last two days 
were blank except for a scribbled mes- 
: "Sorry I couldn't find time for 
the past two days but my husband just 
got back from overseas — first time in 
two years." 

• Arbitron. Probably no tv rating 
yardstick has captured the imagination 
of advertiser and broadcaster more than 
has this electronic device. Connected 
via telephone lines from tv homes to 
the central unit in ARB's office, it re- 
cords every 90 seconds how many 
homes are tuned to each station in a 
market. The Arbitron room at ARB's 
Park Avenue office in New York re- 
sembles a gale-stricken radio repair 
shop; the room next door that features 
only the Arbitron board (where final 
computations are translated into little 
lights that indicate ratings) is far more 
quiet and orderly. But the heart of the 
service remains the big automaton 
which, if 50 homes suddenly tune out 
a program half way through, records 
it a minute-and-a-half later; only pro- 
ducers with strong nerves should watch 
it. The New York operation is still 
only a partial sample; 300 is the de- 
I sired one, but telephone lines now ac- 
commodate only slightly more than 200. 
1 Each morning, after Arbitron has 
I been checked and its findings changed 
j into ratings, ARB multilith presses im- 
mediately turn out complete reports for 
the day and night before. Arbitron 
does not measure audience composition 
although at first it had been equipped 
with a gadget that was a sort of elec- 
tronic Peeping Tom and showed the 
vague figures in a living room before 
a set. 

! • Telephone coincidentaL For 
special studies and fast reports, ARB 
added a telephone coincidental depart- 
ment about two years ago. In about 
300 markets on a day or two notice, 
ARB can survey a special situation via 
phone and report within a day. ITiis 
department is doing well; billings now 
amount to about $150,000 a year. ^ / 



NOW! 
WABT- 

Birmingham 

WAPI-TV 

Channel 13 

^Call letters that have 
meant the best in radio 
for the past 35 years now 
mean the finest in tele- 
vision too. 

A Complete WAPI 
Broadcasting Service 

WAPI 



Radio 1070 KG 
50,000 Watts* 



WAPI-TV 



TV Channel 13 
316,000 Watts 



WAPI-FM 

FM 99.5 MC 
72,000 Watts 

* 5,000 Nights 
Effective Soon 

Represented Nationally by 

HENRY I. CHRISTAL 

Represented Nationally by 

HARRINGTON, RIGHTER and 
PARSONS, INC. 



II . PURCEIL. Pies, and Gen. Mgr. • MILTON H. KLEIN, Sales Mgi. 
Represented nationally by JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



QUAD-CITIES 



ROCK ISLAND 



now the nation's 



47 



th 



RETAIL SALES are above 
the national average. Rock 
Island, Moline, East Moline 
are rated as "preferred 
cities" by Sales Management 
magazine for the first 6 
months of 1958. You too, can 
expect above-average sales if 
you BUY WHBF-TV NOW! 



CBS 



The SELLibrated (and only full 
powered) station in the 

GOLDEN VALLEY 

(Central Ohio) 

WHTN 
TV 

CHANNEl 13 
Huntington-Charleston, W. Va. 



TV MARKET 

according to Television Age Magazine 
I 
I 

I 

WHBF-TV 

CBS for EASTERN IOWA 
and WESTERN ILLINOIS 

REPRESENTED BY AVERY KNODEL, INC. 



I SOAP'S BIG THREE 

(Cont'd from page 35) 

' lion in daytime net tv in this year's 
first quarter, has stepped that up, is 
expected to spend closer to $9 million 
1 in this year's last quarter. 

P&G's programing policy is similar 
to its major competitors': 1) buy 
nighttime net tv shows on the basis of 
past success, and 2) in daytime net tv 
hold down the number of stations until 
you see where the show is going, then 
expand if it works out. 

Colgate's net tv policy apparently is 
still undergoing change after the com- 
pany's disappointment with the Col- 
gate Comedy Hour. Shortly after the 
show went off the air, Colgate (strong- 
ly influenced, say admen, by Bates) 
swung heavily into spot tv. Now Col- 
gate is reportedly heading for a 50-50 
spread between net and spot tv. 

Colgate's programing policy has 
been described by one network execu- 
tive as "buying pretty much what Mr. 
Little wants." Colgate spreads its 
brands over almost all its shows, both 
daytime and night, and groups them 
wherever desirable. 

Lever also had a reorganization 
which, in late 1956, brought in Sam 
Thurm (from Y&R) to become media 
manager. Thurm, whose background 
is in radio/tv, reflected Lever's desire 
to move more heavily into air media. 

Lever's daytime net tv strategy is 
interesting as a prime example of 
maximum dispersion. In an average 
week on NBC alone this fall, Lever will 
buy seven quarter-hours, sprinkled 
throughout the morning and through- 
out the week with no regular pattern. 
And the buys vary from week to week, 
from day to day and from show to 
show. In nighttime. Lever is strong 
in net tv show ownership, (although as 
some agencymen believe. Lever kept 
too many shows when they were be- 
yond their peak), may swing more to 
a better balance between net and spot. 

Lever apparently is interested in 
ABC TV's new daytime charter plan, 
will give it a try. This sort of think- 
ing, say some admen, is what some- 
times gives Lever an edge over P&G 
which is too "hidebound" to experi- 
ment with the untried and unproven. 

In radio, the Big Three have very 
definite patterns. In general, the soap 
makers make spot radio buys for one 
of three reasons: 

1) To supplement tv in areas where 
tv penetration is not strong enough. 



For example, Lever's Breeze is using 
spot in 15 smaller markets because the 
company felt its tv coverage there was 
weak. 

2) To meet competitive situations. 
Whether it's a test market campaign 
or an effort to buy out all available 
time to freeze out a competitor's new 
product (an old soap industry trick), 
spot radio is used extensively and ef- 
fectively. For new product introduc- 
tion campaigns, soap makers buy sat- 
uration spot radio, primarily 30's and 
60's, and in many cases make spot 
radio the primary medium until the 
product is established. Spot radio is 
an ideal medium for market-by-market 
introductions (the more popular mar- 
keting strategy in the soap industry), 
and several campaigns currently are 
underway. 

3) For special promotions, coupon 
deals, etc. Spot radio's flexibility 
means an opportunity to saturate one 
area, then move on to another. 

One advantage spot radio has over 
net radio for the soap companies is 
obvious from the age breakdown of 
daytime net radio shows in any Niel- 
sen report (and a point station reps 
sell hard) : the majority of housewives 
listening to net shows are in the higher 
age groups. The soap companies, aim- 
ing for the young housewife, find they 
often reach her better via local spot. 

Again, the strategy of the soap com- 
panies in spot radio is apparent from 
a look at RAB's report of time seg- 
ments bought in this year's second 
quarter. P&G, sticking with its pref- 
erence for minutes, bought only 60's — 
and only about 4,500 of them. Lever, 
on the other hand, bought more than 
16,000 minutes — but also bought a sub- 
stantial number of lO's, 20's and 30's. 
Colgate's spot radio buy for the sec- 
ond quarter was about 11,500 minutes 
and some 20's— but no lO's or 30's. 

In net radio — once a major medium 
for soap companies — tv hit hardest 
where it hurt most: prime evening: 
hours. I 

Even in network radio (considering! 
the comparatively small buys theyj 
make today), the strategy of the Big! 
Three varies. Lever will jump in with 
100 minutes of participating sponsor- 
ship for a two-week period, then jump 
out altogether. P&G will buy 30's and 
60's of participating time on a 13-week 
cycle. Colgate does much the same. 
but also sticks with its old favorite- 
(such as Bill Stem). ^ 



SPONSOR • 27 SEPTEMBER 195f! 



Always Remember: 
the BIG GAME 
In Radio 
Is the 
ADULT 
AUDIENCE . . 



If you want to bag the 
folks who can buy in 
the rich Rochester ter- 
ritory, keep your sales 
message on the track of 
the ADULT audience, 
the folks who tune to 
station WHEC! 



*PULSE REPORT-Rochester Metropolitan Area 
Audience Composition Data — March, 1958 




r^-^ ^ <» "\\ 




OF UIHEC 

USTEnERS ARE 

RDUITS 




BASIC CBS 

AM-TV 

ROCHESTER 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 




HOUSTON'S 

FAMILY 

STATION! 



KTRK-TV,channell3 



Top 



■ir 



PERSONAUTy 




? 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Hal James, vice president and radio/tv 
(liirctdi- of programing of DCSS, has re- 
cent 1\ l)eeii appointed national sales direc- 
tor of Independent Television Corp., it was 
announced by Walt Kingsley, president of 
the company. In announcing the appoint- 
ment, Kingsley said, "We feel that Hal 
James' experience at the agency and spon- 
sor level will enable ITC to do a better job 
of translating its program plans to agencies and advertisers who use 
network television." James has also been affiliated with Compton 
Advertising. J. Walter Thompson, Needham, Louis & Brorby. He 
has been responsible for radio and television planning of such na- 
tional advertisers as Bristol-Myers, Cities Service. Celanese Corp., 
McKesson & Bobbins and Bayuk cigars. He lives in Westport. Conn. 




19 



John Harkrader lias been made manager 
of WDBJ-TV in Boanoke, Virginia. The 
new position was created when the radio 
and tv divisions were separated. According 
to Ray P. Jordan, vice president of broad- 
casting for the Times-World Corp., the 
separation of activities was made neces- 
sary by the "rapid growth of the service 
area, and the consequent growth of the 
Times-World's broadcast facilities." Harkrader brings to his new 
position a long association with radio and television. Among his 
previous positions with WDBJ: promotion director, national sales 
manager, commercial manager and assistant manager of radio/tv. 
He resides in Roanoke, and is a graduate of Boanoke College. 



Frank E. Koehler will take over as man- 
ager of WDBJ, Roanoke, in conjunction 
with the split of radio and tv facilities. 
Koehler, whose broadcasting experience 
dates back to 1934, is a graduate of 
Tasculum College, and of the even more 
famous NBC Page Boy School. He also 
worked briefly for NBC as guest relations 
supervisor before starting a sales career 
which has included positions at WRTD (now WRNL) Richmond, 
and WSIS and WROV, Roanoke. He joined the staflF of WDBJ in 
1955 as sales manager. In his new post he'll be one of an increasing 
number of top station executives, who are devoting full time to radio. 
He is a past president of the Virginia Assn. of Broadcasters, and 
on the board of directors of the Roanoke Sales Executives Club. 




27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



To sell Indiana, 
you need both 
the 2nd and 3rd 
ranking markets. 

NOW 
ONE BUY 

delivers both — 



YOU NEED TWO GUNS 
in Indiana! 




Here, where hunting's the hobby, sharpshooting adver- 
tisers bag two traditional test markets— Fort Wayne and 
South Bend - Elkhart — with one combination buy which 
saves 10%. They thus draw a bead on 340,000 TV homes — 
a bigger target than T.A.'s 43rd market!* Over 1,688,000 
total population— more people than Arizona, Colorado or 
Nebraska! Effective Buying Income, nearly $3 Billion— 
and it's yours with just one buy! 



I your H""R man now! ^UftitStm^ 






SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



Do you know your representative? 

These are the days when station managers are congregating 
in the big advertising centers to talk over new spot business 
with agencies and representatives. And surely changes in the 
complexion of the business — even since last year — must seem 
tremendous, for example: 

• Whereas spot once was a fairly casual buy, the speed of 
today's marketing has made that avenue so important that at 
Y&R, for instance, as many as 15 specialists will get in- 
volved in a single spot campaign, 

• By that very token, the role of the representative is 
taking on a much wider scope. Today he's the glue, if you 
please, that binds together the whole complex rigamarole of 
sponsor agency requirements with station capabilities, rates, 
services, etc. In a relatively few years his function has 
changed from mere ticket-seller on the spot railroad to traffic 
manager, expediter, and consultant. 

It's a curious fact, though, that while this inevitable evolu- 
tion has taken place, the representatives nevertheless consider 
it important right now to devise a new code and polish up 
their image in general. Even if the effort superficially seems 
like an unnecessary gilding SPONSOR heartily endorses it 
for these reasons: 

1) Too many stations still don't realize the potential of 
spot. In fact, the bigger agencies and sponsors actually may 
be ahead of the stations in their spot thinking. The repre- 
sentatives know this. 

2) Similarly, some stations apparently still fail to compre- 
hend the multiple services that their representatives makes 
available. 

By all indications, this is going to be an enormous year for 
the spot medium. And we hope that as station managers get 
to Chicago, New York, Detroit, etc., they will thoroughly 
acquaint themselves with the new agency thinking. 

In short, get to know your national representative better. 
It may mean an agreeable, surprising payoff for both of you. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: A realistic analysis 
of radio values, both by networks and indivi- 
dual stations, followed by rates that are in 
proper perspective tvith such a sound appraisal. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Tender trap: John Burns, a contest- 
ant on ABC TV's Who Do You Trust? 
was trapped in the isolation booth '. 
when the door jammed. It took the I 
studio carpenters to release him. Prov- 
ing that even if contestants shouldn't 
be fixed, booth doors should. 

Jingle revisited: From WTCN, Min- 
neapolis-St. Paul, we learn that one of 
radio's oldest singing commercials is ; 
coming back on the air for Gluek 
Brewing Co. — "Be like the bottle; say, 
Gluek-Gluek-Gluek." Or, Hic-hic-hic. 
Spare: Rusty, the cairn terrier on the 
WBBM-TV, Chicago, program, Susan's 
Shoiv has a stand-in. During each per- 
formance, Rusty's double waits patient- 
ly off camera. Well, that's life for an 
understudy. 

Bird-watcher: A Madison Avenue 
adgal has a phobia about pigeons, 
will in fact cross a street to avoid 
walking close to one. The other day, 
she alighted from a Fifth Avenue bus 
in front of St. Patrick's Cathedral, only 
to find her way to the curb blocked by 
a whole flock of the birds. She spun 
about, and unmindful of the traffic, 
fairly flew across the Avenue to the 
Radio City side. As the made the curb, 
a policeman was waiting, summons 
book in hand. "There's a jay-walking 
law, Miss," said the policeman, "so 
that's going to cost you two dollars." 
"It's worth it," our adgal replied, "be- 
cause the pigeons over there wouldn't 
let me on the sidewalk." The police- 
man blinked, flipped shut his book and^ 
walked away. Our adgal distinctly 
heard him say, "Holy cow, the neurol 
ics one meets in this town!" 
Music-news: Dallas Townsend, CBS; 
Radio newscaster, checked U.S. copy-l 
right office and discovered these new I 
song titles: "Take Me to The Moon,i 
Mr. Calhoun," "Spaceship Lullaby," 
"Sputnik Love," "Beep-Beep, Beep- 
Beep," "Let Me Be Your Satellite," 
and "Santa and The Satellite." 
Report: In Las Vegas, tv show Silent 
Service is reportedly beating Twenty- 
One in the ratings. On tv maybe, but 
not in the casinos. 

Odd Facts Dept.: WFBM, Indian 
apolis, in a recent contest, proved it 
took .5,228y2 hot dogs to reach from' 
the studio to a hi fi shop four blocks 
away. Okay, and that would take how 
much mustard? 



27 SEPTEMBER 1958 



WSAZ-TV 
. . . the winner in every race! 



vx«%VCV\tuv\il\\ii\i^. .tvUiUlU I k . . I ill ill. 



• CHARLESTON ARB Share of Audience 
^ HUNTINGTON ARB Share of Audience 
y AREA ARB Share of Audience 
• NCS * 3 total counties 
^ NCS # 3 daily circulation 
v^ NCS # 3 weekly circulation 
y ARE-TOP 1 0-ln HUNTINGTON 
• ARB-TOP 10-ln CHARLESTON 
^ ARB METRO. PORTSMOUTH, OHIO 
^ ARB METRO. PARKERSBURG, W. VA. 
v^ ARB Coincidental Nighttime NEWS 



^^j^u^'unj^^^'^ ^v(!pt'' 



wmom 




CHAISNEI^ 



HUNTl/SCTON-CHARLESTON, W VA. 

AilUiaied wiih Radio Stations 
WSAZ. Hunlmglon 6 WKAZ Charlesron 
LAWRENCE H. ROGERS, PRESIDENT 

C. TOM GARTEN, V.P. & Commercial Manager 



The details are more exciting than the America's Cup Race . . . Call your "KATZ" Man! 



JUST ARRIVED! 




GET IT FIRST AND GET IT RIGHT 

TIME-CLOCKED NEWS, SPORTS, TRAFFIC REPORTS 

RADIO LOS ANGELES __^ »■■»«— ^u u^aaak ^aaa 

|ir| M Jm •570- FIRST ON YOUR DIAL 

Kl Al •NEARLY EVERYBODY IN SOUTHERN 
|%linV CALIFORNIA LISTENS TO KLAC 

One of America's Great hdependent Radio Stations 



4 OCTOBER 19S8 
20< a copy • $3 a year 



4^ 



^9 ^^ 1^ 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



spon'SOr (spon'ser) 

[L., fr. spondere, sponsum, 



n 



to engage oneself, promise. 1 1. A person, business firm or other organization 
that finances a TV program in return for advertisement of a product. 2. An adver- 
tiser who wishes to reach the GET AGE audience. See ABC Television, et seq. 
3. Commonly, one who strives to place his commercial message in the best 
competitive position with regard to program, time slot and cost. - Syn. Any 
of the following list of ABC-TV's advertisers: 

AMANA REFRIGERATION, INC. AMERICAN CHICLE CO. AMER- 
ICAN HOME PRODUCTS CORP. (WHITEHALL LABORATORIES, INC.) 
AMERICAN MACHINE & FOUNDRY CO. (PINSPOTTERS, INC.) 
BEECH-NUT LIFE SAVERS, INC. BRISTOL-MYERS CO. BROWN & 
WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORP. CAMPBELL SOUP CO. CARTER 
PRODUCTS, INC. CHRYLSER CORP. (DODGE DIV., PLYMOUTH DIV.) 
CORN PRODUCTS CO. (BEST FOODS DIV.) THE CRACKER JACK CO. 
THE DRACKETT CO. EASTCO, INC. EASTMAN KODAK CO. FIRE- 
STONE TIRE & RUBBER CO. • GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. GENERAL 
FOODS CORP. GENERAL MILLS, INC. GENERAL MOTORS CORP. 
(AC SPARK PLUG, CHEVROLET, OLDSMOBILE DIVISIONS) THE 
GILLETTE CO. (TONI CO.) GOLD SEAL CO. THE B. F. GOODRICH 
CO. (FOOTWEAR AND FLOORING DIVISIONS) HARTZ MOUNTAIN 
PRODUCTS HILLS BROS. COFFEE, INC. JOHNSON & JOHNSON 
KAISER INDUSTRIES CORP. KELLOGG CO. P. LORILLARD CO. 
LUDEN'S, INC. MANHATTAN SHIRT CO. MARS, INC. MATTEL, 
INC. THE MENNEN CO. MILES LABORATORIES, INC. MILLER 
BREWING CO. MINNESOTA MINING & MFG. CO. NATIONAL BIS- 
CUIT CO. THE NESTLE CO., INC. PROCTER & GAMBLE CO. THE 
QUAKER OATS CO. RALSTON-PURINA CO. REYNOLDS METALS 
CO. R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO. HAROLD F. RITCHIE, INC. 
SEVEN-UP CO. SHULTON, INC. SMITH BROS. SWEETS CO. OF 
AMERICA, INC. SYLVANIA ELECTRIC PRODUCTS, INC. UNION 
CARBIDE CORP. (NATIONAL CARBON CO.) VICK CHEMICAL CO. 
THE WELCH GRAPE JUICE CO., INC. WILLIAMSON-DICKIE MFG. CO. 



1^ i! 



pon^ta-ne^i-ty 



(spon^tane^Tti) n. 



1. The quality of acting from an inner energy; always implies the power of 
choice. 2. Specifically, that which characterizes the way advertisers move to 

ABC TELEVISION 



RADIO PEPS 
UP ITS NEWS 
LEADERSHIP 

The local radio station 
is becoming the nation's 
No. 1 reporter on local 
news. 'Copters, mobile 
units, speedboats build 
ratings, audience loyal- 
ty and prestige, and 
attract big buyers 

Page 29 

Radio/tv boost 
North Agency to 
top in three years I 

Page 32 | 

Trendex 
moves into 
50 new markets 

Third of a 
SPONSOR series 
Page 36 



How tv whipped 
the sales potato 
for French's 

Page 38 




Territorial Governor of Alaska, Mike Stepovich, on the 
left, shown here accepting a film of Iowa's Governor Love- 
less welcoming Alaska to the Union. Presenting the film 



is Dick Compton, KVTV newsman, who 
record personally, this history-making ( 
becoming the 49th state for KVTV view, 



WHEN THE BIG NEWS WAS ALASKA 
A KVTV NEWSMAN WAS THERE 



Dick Compton's trip to Alaska is typical 
of the traveling KVTV newsmen do to 
record and film news as it happens. A 
team covered the "Peaceful Uses of 
Atomic Energy" conference in Geneva, 
Switzerland. Daily films were rushed back 
for use on KVTV. Channel 9 viewers saw 
last minute films of the Lebanon crisis. 
KVTV was in Beirut when the news was 
made. Another team will cover South 
American news next February. 
Why this on-the-spot coverage of news? 
KVTV believes it has a responsibility to 



the people it serves. A duty to keep them 
intelligently informed on domestic and 
world affairs. This is best done by send- 
ing men to report and interpret the news 
as it happens, when it happens. 

What does all this mean to you? People 
in the Sioux City area have come to de- 
pend on KVTV as the station with the 
important things first. That's why KVTV 
is the most watched station in Sioux City 
—why KVTV is your best buy in Sioux 
City. 




Bob Billman, left, and Charles Powell, 
along with Dick Compton, pictured above, com- 
prise the KVTV news team. These arc the men 
who bring to KVTV viewers the latest reports and 
tilms of the local, national and world news 
wherever it is happening. 



flWIV 

CHANNEL 9 • SIOUX CITY, IOWA 
CBS . ABC 


.^B^ 




PEOPLES 
BROADCASTING CORPORATION 
WGAR, Cleveland, Ohio 
WRFD, Worthington, Ohio 
WTTM, Trenton, New Jersey 
WMMN. Fairmont, V^est Virginia 
WNAX, Yankton, South Dakota 
KVTV, Sioux City, Iowa 


Awmmm 


k 


Wni^ivjji- 


_jm 


iTmX 


M 


trV¥\""'i 


\ ^ 




1,^ 


m L.j.irA 1 


^1511' 



Serving 

more 

Advertisers 




/ORK. CHICAGO, LOS ANGELES. 



ISCO. BOSTOr 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



4 October 1958 



I ol. 12, Ao. 40 



^ SPONSOR 

^^^^ THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Radio news gears itself to jet age 

29 Today, the radio station lias taken over the newspaper's job of reporting 
loial news. Here's what this significant trend means to media field 

North agency builds fast with radio/tv 



32 Clhicago agency, starti 
Sll million. Marketir 



only three years ago, is already billing ov( 
research both play big role in its operatio 



The big stereo broadcast boom is here 

35 Lawrence Welk on ABC TV/AM and George Gobel on NBC TV/AM 
kick off first regular network programing in stereo sound. Here's outlook 

Trendex to add city reports 

36 ^<'^^ service will cover .50 markets on a regularly reporting for first 
time a market-by-market brand share index for 20 product categories 



Edi 

Norr 


tor and Publi 

nan R. Glenn 


sher 


S*cr«tary-Tr*asii 


r«r 


Elain 


e Couper Glenn 




VP- 


Assistant Pu 


blisher 


Bern 


and Piatt 




EDI 


TORIAL DEP 





Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

iManaging Editor 

Alvin W. Outcalt 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffa 

Senior Editor 

W. P. MIksch 

Associate Editor 

Russ Carpenter 

■Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Snnart 

Western Editor (Los Angeles) 

Pete Rankin 

Film Editor 

Beth Drexler Brod 

Assistant Editors 

Jack Lindrup 

Gloria Florowitl 



Tv makes French's the "grocery product of the year" 

38 French's broke consumer advertising for its Instant Mashed Potato last 
year exclusively on television. Results: an over-all sales gain of 250% 

How do you rate on SQ-1? 

39 Here-> a bright neu sim,ns.,U qii 



idustry abbreviations. Ever 
you identify these 30 other. 



Tea spots run one-two in radio vote 

40 2000 air media execs give first place to National Tea Council radio com- 
mercials prepared by Leo Burnett, second to Ogilvy's Tetley campaign 

Radioactive weather 

42 The wild effects of radio on weather and vice versa, as Seattle disk 
jockeys pray for rain and New York radio airs report on fake blizzard 

Karl's shoes sells minority markets with spot radio 

42 For tfie past 18 months this West Coast shoe chain has beamed its sales 



larkets 



ithin 



irkels.' Manag 



pie; 



SPONSOR ASKS: Can off-beat animated commercials 
really sell a mass market? 

44 With the increased use of animated conmiercials three experts dis- 
cus^. the question of whether the off-beat really sells a mass market 



FEATURES 

8S Film-.Scope 

22 49th and Madison 

56 Marketing Week 

60 News & Idea Wrap-lp 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

BO l*i< lure Wrap-Up 

58 .'sponsor Hears 

12 Sjwnsor Backstage 



17 Sponsor-Scope 

TO .Sponsor Speaks 

46 Spot Buys 

70 Ten-Second Spots 

8 Timebuyers at Work 

68 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

AS Tv Results 

57 Washington Week 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 



VP-Western Manager 

bdwin D. Cooper 
Soutliern Manager 
hie.b Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 
Scindra Lee Oncay. Asst. 
Administrative Staff 



Je< 



I RItter 



Promotion & Research D< 

Jane Pinkerton, mqr. 

Sara NIcoll 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
-nilv Cut- 



l-lar 



. Flel 



JTfW 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertisine Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th & Madison) Nfew York 17, N. Y. Tel«- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Offic* 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863 
Birmingham Office: Town House, Birmingham 



Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore II, 
Md. Subscriptions: U.S. $3 a year. Canada and 
foreign $4. Single copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published 
weekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered at 



5)1958 Sponsor Publications In 




ST. LOOIE, LOOIE 



AT THE 




SEMINAR 

SALES PROMOTION * AUDIENCE 
PROMOTION * MERCHANDISING * 
PUBLICITY* PUBLIC RELATIONS* 
COMPETITIVE MEDIA PROMOTION 
'TRADE PAPER ADVERTISING 

These are the top subjects to be studied in 
depth at third annual BPA Seminar, Chase 
Hotel, St. Louis, November 16 through 19. 
Mosi of the top broadcast promotion brains 
in the industry will be bustin' v 
stations big and small, in big i..a,rx^Lo ^..^ 
small towns, radio and TV. 

If you've got a stake in broadcast promotion, 
you'll want to meet us at the Chase. 

Full and partial registrations are available 



190 North State Street, Chicago, 
tion on individual sessions. 



CLIP OUT AND MAIL 





Better take to the air in Los Angeles... where KMPC, and 
)nly KMPC, puts its advertisers' messages into as much as 
J7% of all metropolitan radio homes in a single day... where 
KMPC is ahead, too, in the number of listeners reached in 
jach radio home. / KMPC's clear edge over the competition 
)wes nothing to teenage razzle dazzle. Instead, KMPC gives 
isteners such solid fare as the area's fastest, most versatile 
lews service (3 mobile units and 24-hour monitoring of over- 
seas radio stations), such sports features as the games of the 



Sources: Pulse. July-Ausrust 195H; Pulse Cumulat 



e 1958; Pulse Audi> 



'^- 



mighty Los Angeles Rams and Dodgers. / The advertis<'vhi 
wants thorough coverage of the sprawling Los Angek ' 
ket will make 50,000 watt KMPC his first choice. Give > 
AM Radio Sales, a call and we'll show you exactly why i 

KMPC 

GOLDEN WEST BROADCASTERS, LOS ANELKSI 



ition Supplement, Sum 



ike. Hooper. August 195«. 



ikmai 




h s ahead ? In San Francisco the answer is as plain as can 
SFO leads every other station-morning, afternoon and 

t'!ng...both weekdays and weekends. Besides, KSFO 

a< es more people per quarter hour in each listening home, 
facts beyond the decimal points are impressive, too. 
) gives its listeners action, not the synthetic excitement 
mmicks and give-aways but the sure impact of such 

tictions as live coverage of the games of pro-football's 
and baseball's Giants, weather reports from the sta- 
own airplanes, traffic information from dozens of estab- 



lished check points on the gi'ound. / There's more to the story 
But it all adds up to this : in the big Bay Area more and more 
people are paying attention to KSFO. If you sell something 
they should hear about, call us or AM Radio Sales. 




GOLDEN WEST BROADCASTERS, SAN FRANCISCO 



^^^^ust. 



ie Audience Compo; 



ition Supplement. 





'JAXIE" 

ROLLS OUT THE 

RED CARPET 

TO WELCOME 

Kellogg 

TO WFGA-TV's 

GROWING FAMILY OF 
PRESTIGE ADVERTISERS 

NBC— ABC 

1- Represented Nationally by 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



WFGA-TV 

Channel 12 

Jacksonville, Florida 



FLORIDA'S 
COLORFm. STATION 



^ NEWSMAKER 
^ of the week 



Last week, 250 key executives of one of the nation''s leading 
advertising agencies — Benton & Bowles — gathered for a spe- 
cial two-day '"''Account Management Conference'''' at i\. I'.'s 
Sheraton-Plaza Hotel, heard of sweeping changes being made 
in the advertising business '"''because our industry is as dy- 
namic in terms of change as the guided missile industry.^^ 



The newsmaker: Robert E. Lusk. president of Benton & 

Bowles, who called the unusual ( for the agency business ) manage- 
ment session because as he said, "we must take stock of where 
we've been, where we are, and where we're going." 

Obvious to all industry observers is that fact that B&B seems to 
be heading upward at a healthy rate. Lusk announced last week that 
the agency's billings will top $100 million in 1958, an increase of 
$8-9 million over last year. 

Even more significant in terms of change, is the emergence of tv 
as the dominant factor in the agency's operation. Today more than 
65% of B&B's billing is in air 
media, with tv getting by far the 
biggest chunk. 

"It's a fact we kept stressing 
over and over again to all of peo- 
ple," said Lusk in a special spon- 
sor interview. "Tv, and marketing 
with tv, are the two biggest factors 
in our operations, and we have to 
plan all our activities around 
them." 

Sensitivity to changing condi- 
tions in the agency business has 
marked B&B planning during the 
past decade. With billings up 350' 
first to institute an "all-media" buying setup, and the first to change 
its creative department from print and broadcasting specialists to 
a copy group team operation for all media. 

B&B also stresses air media programing facilities (a special film 
on this was shown at the management conference) and the agency 
is responsible for more tv programing for both P&G and General 
Foods than any other agency serving these giant clients. 

Among important bits of news announced by Lusk to B&B execu- 
tives last week was the purchase by the agency of a controlling in- 
terest in the London firm of Lamb and Robinson, a British agency 
with approximately $6 million in billings, including the account of 
P&G's English subsidiary, Thomas Headley and Co. The new firm 
will be known as Lamb and Robinson-Benton & Bowles. 

Main purpose of last week's conference, however, was to "show 
our people how to do a better job in servicing accounts." And, says 
Lusk, the most important things in the whole operation are know- 
how about marketing, and know-how about air media. W 

SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 




Robert E. Lusk 
since 1948 the agency was the 



NEED 
INSUR- 
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nunued P^"^^"' 
in the ("'""• 
""^ „ caTZISOER 










Timebuyers 
at work 




Doris Could, chief timebuyer, Product Services, Inc., New York, 
feels strongly about station representatives who don't send written 
confirmations to buyers before air time. Doris says, "Representatives 
lag behind with these important confirmations just when the margin 
of error is most likely to rise — when staffs are taxed with an increased 
volume of business due to heavy 
seasonal buying. The myriad trans- 
actions during fall and spring in- 
tensify the need to carefully check 
every detail of the written con- 
firmations. Only then can mistakes 
be spotted in time for correction. 
One of our clients. Continental 
Floor Wax, for example, times its 

current saturation campaign to ~l!3^^W I 

coincide with consumer demand 
for fall supplies. Every commercial 
aired reacts upon the client's sales 

curve. A commercial missed due to a slip at any level is ( 
Doris points out that written confirmations clearly identify the guilty 
party in the case of error. "No buyer or representative can plead 
innocent in the face of facts — and the buyer who crawls out on a 
limb for a rep too often had better get hep to the law of survival." 



Barbara Singer, Victor & Richards, Inc., New York, feels that "tele- 
vision, contrary to popular belief in the trade, is one of the best 
mediums for mail order accounts. ( The agency handles direct order 
accounts, not 'per inquiry.') Although it is generally believed that 
it's necessary to utilize newspaper and magazine advertising featur- 
ing coupons for a high percent- 
age of return with mail order 
accounts, we at Victor & Richards 
have discovered that the tremen- 
dous visual impact of television 
equals print advertising's advant- 
age." In mail order advertising, 
Barbara points out, it is necessary 
to presell the consumer on the 
product. So television's ability to 
demonstrate the merchandise and 
at the same time convey belie\ 
ability, produces a proportionateh 
high iev|)(.ti-e. In addition. Barbara notes, television advertising i^ 
flexible, creates prestige, and offers high product identification. 
"Since we can measure results in mail order almost immediately 
after exposure," Barbara says, "we know the value of television 
better than most agencies and i 




ertisers working in the inedium. ' 



4 OCTOBKR lOi! 




shake hands with the West 



How? With intelligent CBS network programming, 
colorful locally-originated shows, award-winning 
news and public service broadcasts. 

The stakes (and steaks) are big in more-than-a- 
million Kansas City. 

Ask anyone who's met the West on KCMO-Radio. 



Kansas City, Missouri 



Evans, Commer 



KANSAS CITY 


KCMO 


KCMO-TV The Katz Agency 


SYRACUSE 


WHEN 


WHEN-TV The Katz Agency 


PHOENIX 


KPHO 


KPHO-TV The Katz Agency 


OMAHA 


WOW 


WOW-TV John Blair & Co.— Blair-TV 


TULSA 


KRMG 


John Blair & Co. 



Represented nationally by Katz Agency 

Meredith Stations Are Affiliated with 
BETTER HOMES and GARDENS and SUC- 
CESSFUL FARMING Magazines. 



TNI 




TAia i« anofAer ih our series ahoul aucccas/u( ;;cop/e in adrerfis.nff. Petera, Griffin. Woodward. Inc. Spot Televi 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



\ MR. HAMMERHARDER 



tii 



"Hit the line hard!" says Mr. Hammerharder — and he does! Day after day 
and night after night his Spot TV announcements drive through the middle of 
the big markets and bowl over his opposition in the smaller ones. 

Then, his whole budget takes a rest between halves. 

Mr. Hammerharder's advertising scores heavily, because Spot Television enables 
him to apply it with great power — and no waste. 

Your PGW Colonel would like to send you "A Local Affair", a booklet that will 
show you how powerful Spot Television is on the local scene where your sales 
are made — or lost. Just write to PGW Spot Television, 250 Park Avenue, N. Y. C, 





^^^^ 














/% 
















^ 


// 


cy 
r 




-<^ r^ 


-^ '^.^y-^m^m^m mm 




.# 


♦* 




1 








MIDWEST 




EAST 








^ 








WHO-TV Des Moines 


13 NBC 


WBZ-TV 


Boston 


4 NBC 










WOC-TV Davenport 


6 NBC 


WGR-TV 


Buffalo 


2 NBC 






WEST 






WDSM-TV Duluth-Superior 


6 NBC-ABC 


KYW-TV 


Cleveland 


3 NBC 




~Ss 


KBOI-TV 


Boise 


2 CBS 


WDAY-TV Fargo 


6 NBC-ABC 


WWJ-TV 


Detroit 


4 NBC 




3 


KBTV 


Denver 


9 ABC 


KMBC-TV Kansas City 


9 ABC 


WJIM-TV 


Lansing 


6 CBS 




KGMB-TV 


Honolulu 


9 CBS 


WISC-TV Madison, Wis. 


3 CBS 


WPIX 


New York 


11 IND 




3 

1 


KMAU KHBC-TV Hawaii 




WCCO-TV Minneapolis-St. Paul 


4 CBS 


KDKA-TV 


Pittsburgh 


2 CBS 




KTLA 


Los Angeles 


5 IND 


WMBD-TV Peoria 


31 CBS 


WROC-TV 


Rochester 


5 NBC 




KRON-TV 


San Francisco 


4 NBC 
















KIRO-TV 


Seattle-Tacoma 


7 CBS 


SOUTHWEST 




SOUTHEAST 














KFDM-TV Beaumont 


6 CBS 


WCSC-TV 


Charleston, S 


. C. 5 


CBS 










KRIS-TV Corpus Christ! 


6 NBC 


WIS-TV 


Columbia, S 


C. 10 


NBC 


c- 








WBAP-TV Fort Worth-Dallas 


5 NBC 


WSVA-TV 


Harrisonburg 


Va. 3 


ALL 


i 








KENS-TV San Antonio 


5 CBS 


WFGA-TV 


Jacksonville 


12 


NBC 












WTVJ 


Miami 


4 


CBS 


f 












WDBJ-TV 


Roanoke 


7 


CBS 


,» 




Peters, Griffin, Woodward, mc. 
Spot Television 



Pioneer Sfafion Representatives Since 1 932 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT 



# 



ATLANTA • DALLAS 



**^^, 



"•4 ^ 



FT. WORTH • SAN FRANCISCO <^ 



4 OCTOBER 1958 



by Joe Csida 



Advertisers on KTBS, 
Shreveport, have 
dominant audience, as 
shown by both Nielsen 
and ARB* ratings, 
plus award winning 
promotion. 

Naturally, 
tkey gel 
more for tlieir 
advertising 
doJlar 

Ask the PETRY man 
for details on this 
dominant station in the 
billion dollar three-state 
market where your 
advertising dollar goes 



further. 



8 



^^K 



NBC SHREVEPORT, 

ABC LOUISIANA 

E. Newton Wray Prcs. & Gen. Mgr. 
*May 1958 ARB Metro. Shrcvcnmt Survey 



^ »ponsor 
I backstage 



£' 



A new show, a tarnished idol 

The years play rough with us. Too often they 
corrode the shoes of those we place on pedestals 
and reveal the clay content of the feet. And too 
often what was in the idol's mind is eventually 
exposed as something less inspired than we first 
believed. In my youth, there wasn't one of i 
trying to learn our way with a word who didn't 
read Ben Hecht, and about him with awe. A 
week or so ago on WABC-TV, here in New York, Hecht made his tv 
debut, and sat there barefooted, just ordinary clay. 

True enough the clay is still camouflaged in long strings of color- 
ful, picturesque, often sharp and witty phrases. But the thinking 
underlying the phrases; the knowledge, the philosophies are shallow 
and irresponsible. Hecht opens each show reading an essay, freshly 
written by him, on the evening's theme, with side excursions into 
any other area which strikes his fancy. On opening night, on the 
theme of television commercials, he inserted his opinion on Presi- 
dent Eisenhower's announcement that we would help the Chinese 
Nationalists defend Quemoy and Matsu, and would resist an armed 
aggression against Formosa. 

"The China the President says we'll fight for doesn't exist," said 
pundit Hecht. "Chiang is a Faubus and Taiwan a Little Rock." 

Talented but uninformed 

The talented Hecht is certainly entitled to his opinion, but it is 
shamefully shallow and almost childishly irresponsible for him to 
oversimplify as serious and complex a situation as we face in the 
Far East, by coy analogy. Most thinking and experienced observers 
maintain that the Red Chinese, Soviet-supported, assault on the off- 
shore isles at this point is merely an initial probing to see how far 
we will permit them to go in taking over the whole of East Asia by 
force, before we step in. 

But, as I said, Hecht merely inserted his commentary on Formosa 
in passing along the way to a bitter, though weary, denunciation of 
tv commercials. Here again he demonstrated that he would rather 
say something he considers shocking, than something he knows to 
be true. 

"Television commercials and the atom bomb," he read, "are the 
two things most disliked by the people of America today." 

He expressed fatigued amazement over the fact that sponsors con- 
tinue to present commercials on television. He proceeded to gnaw 
the hand that feeds him (he is sponsored by Schiffli Fabrics) clear 
up to the elbow, and then invited his guest, our erstwhile columning 
mate, and BBDO radio/Tv Vice President (author of "The Hot Half 
Hour," a novel about a quiz show) Bob Foreman to make rebuttal. 
Bob did fine, in so far as the boorish Hecht would permit. 

"While you have a charm coinpletely your own," he said to Hecht. 
"the manner in which the copy is read on the audio portion of these 
commercials is a little different from your reading." 

Hecht delivered each piece of commercial copy in the infinitely 



4 OCTOBER 19.5<'> 



((getting more 

out of television 



In three all -important are as ^ 

J. Walter Thompson Company is finding new ways 

to increase the value of TV as a marketing tool 



1. The message 



In a matter of seconds — so7/>eth//es as feiv as ten — the 
view er must recognize a special quality in a product 
that is iieii's to him ... a quahty that will better fill some 
need in his life. What is the news? And how can one 
be sure it is presented most effectively? 

In its unique T\^ Workshop, the J. Walter Thompson 
Company tests ways of presenting a product under 
actual telecast conditions— htioYt spending time and 
money on a finished commercial. 

The most eflFective demonstration of the 
special quality of one household product 
was selected for the finished commercial, 
only after 25 such experiments. 
Thus, theTV Workshop offers a new method of extend- 
ing the boundaries of creative imagination, then pro- 
vides the visual evidence needed for the soundest choices. 



2. The program 



What type of program will attract the audience the 
message is designed to reach? Will the background pro- 
vided by such a program be appropriate? 

_ Should it be a Western? A situation comedy? \ariety? 
Drama? Why are some programs in each of these 
categories more efficient than others? Why do some 
fail— others succeed? Do some of them have "survival 
qualities" which will assure them of continuing success? 
Every type of program has "survival qualities," to 



greater or lesser degree. J. ^^ alter Thompson Company 
is continuing to find new means of appraising and cre- 
ating such "survival qualities"— to help make television 
an increasingh' reliable marketing tool. 



3. Time period 

Convincing message. Outstanding program. But . . . 

they can be fully productive only 
in the right kind of time period. 

Selecting the right kind of time period is an art calling 
for special knowledge as well as special skills in analys- 
ing competition and in predicting the viewing patterns 
of particular shows. 

J. Walter Thompson Company has recently issued a 
confidential study of television which illustrates this 
special knowledge. It covers television from virtually 
every angle. Program types and trends, viewing habits, 
audience characteristics, network rate structures and 
procedures, and rating services are among the basic 
topics covered. 

This study has been called "searching... objective... 
authoritative." 

If you would like to explore with us the most effec- 
tive use of TX as an integrated part of your marketing 
program, wt would be happy to discuss it with you. 

There are J. Walter Thompson Company offices in: 
New York, Chicago, Detroit, San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Hollywood, \^ ashington, D. C, Miami. 



4 OCTOBER 1958 



lei You Can't Name 
he Nation's No- 1 Port 

B in Total -^^^^^pCc 
Export-Import Tonnage 




It has grown 

more than 100% since 195i! 



The answer* is Tidewater, Va. In other 
words, Norfolk and Newport News . . . 
side by side on the great harbor of 
Hampton Roads. 

If you were surprised by Tidewater's 
rank as a port, you may be surprised 
also by its rank as a market. 

Two reasons why this is likely: 1) Rapid 
growth — nearly 60,000 population gain in 
1957 alone! 2) Its true size is obscured by 
the Government list of metro county 
areas which separates Norfolk and New- 
port News, though they are less than 



four miles apart at nearest points, aill 
inseparable for all radio and televisid 
marketing purposes. 

Combine them and you find a met:|> 
county area of over ^4 million people, toj- 
ping all in the southeast except Atlan . 
and Miami. 

Tidewater, Va., is what Virginians cd 
it. TIDEWTAR is a better way to spell |: 
. . . and the best way to sell it. For WTAl- 
TV is the greatest marketing force i 
this great and growing market! 



'Source: FT Report 985, U.S. Depl. of Commerce, Bureau of Cengi 



• 4 OCTOBER 193!) 




mm 

iii; jChannel 3 • Norfolk 
5]s I'eatest Marketing Force 
i'|;in|'irginia's Greatest Market 



Sponsor backstage continued . 



tired manner in which he does the whole half hour. To this viewer 
it is the most honest phase of the show. There is little doubt that 
Hecht is indeed a tired old man. 

Bob also pointed out that a cold reading of the audio portion of 
the commercial, without the accompanying video hardly gives an 
accurate picture of the over-all intent or possible appeal or lack of 
same of the plug. However, Bob did not have very much oppor- 
tunity to answer the questions posed by Hecht. Each time he uttered 
his first, few soft-spoken, thoughtfully considered words Hecht mum- 
bled an interruption. If Bob wins no other award this year, he 
surely should walk away with the medal for "most polite, most 
patient guest of the year." He treated Hecht with the respect a 
brilliant craftsman with words, however shallow and weary today, 
deserves. 

And on the following evening Hecht proved himself far more a 
gentleman and a human being than he seemed to be on his first show. 
He opened his second stanza by making apologies to Bob for having 
cut in on him so continually, attributed his crudeness to "opening 
night devils," and promised to be more courteous to guests hence- 
forth. 

About which, a little more in a moment — but while Godfrey and 
Henry Morgan, and Alfred Hitchcock and even, on occasion, a Jack 
Paar are able to sell their sponsor's merchandise by poking fun at 
the product or its maker, it simply doesn't come off with Hecht. 
Perhaps it's a matter of pro, as opposed to amateur. The God- 
freys and Paars are old pros — and even a Hitchcock has guided 
performers through enough shoals to cut a true path himself — and, 
as a tv personality, Hecht, of course, is a rank amateur. 

With Bob Foreman he was too inconsiderate, and got almost 
nothing from his guest simply because of his constant interruptions, 
and on the following evening, after making the aforementioned apol- 
ogy, he blew the show for a total failure to hold the reins at all. His 
guest was Emil Zola Berman, the attorney who defended the tough 
Marine officer who marched those kids into death by drowning in 
a swamp. 

First anticipation, then let-down 
Hecht opened show No. 2 by reading his essay on lawyers. Again 
it was full of observations as lacking in depth as they were color- 
fully stated. Among other definitions he called lawyers, "immoral 
moralists." 

Berman waited until Hecht completed his reading, and then took 
over. He treated Hecht like a witness, whom he (Berman) had on 
the stand under cross-examination. He began comment after com- 
ment with phrases like "do you mean to sit there and . . ." and he 
read these in a most derisive and contempt-filled manner. On one 
occasion when Hecht did manage to get back into the conversation. 
Berman said: "I see that you consider to pursue the error of your 
uninformed ways . . ." 

Naturally Zola had a vast advantage over Hecht. He knew his 
subject (law) intimately and in tremendous depth, and Hecht obvi- 
ously didn't. 

I tuned in the first Hecht shows, hoping, almost expecting one of 
the best new personality-interview shows in tv, one I hoped would 
quickly go network. But, as I remarked a few hundred words back, 
the years play rough. ^ 



4 OCTOBER 1958 




Bartell Family Radio is 
an exciting package, en- 
thusiastically accepted by 
the American consumer 
market. The product has 
wide appeal, containing a 
tempting basic ingredient: 
Family Fun. This consists 
in part of copyright featur- 
ettes, companionable music, 
imaginative news reporting 
— all presented with warm, 
friendly professionalism. 
No "formula radio" here! — 
but programing continu- 
ously researched toward 
maximum response, best 
results. 

Each advertising message 
carries the prestige of more 
than a decade of radio 
leadership; reaches more 
buyers at louver cost. 




BARTELL IT . . . and SELL IT! 




AMERICA'S FIRST RADIO FAMILY SERVING 1 5 MILLION BUYERS 

Sold Nationally by ADAM YOUNG INC. 



4 OCTOBER 1958 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 




SPONSOR-SCOPE 



4 OCTOBER 1958 Tv network advertisers this fall are spending over $4.5 million per week for 

c««yri«ht I9M regularlv scheduled nighttime programing alone. 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. » ^ ,,,,,, 7., ,. ,. .. 

Here are some rules of thumb for deterrammg the relation ot tv program costs to 
tv time costs: 

NIGHTTIME NETWORK TV: If you call the time cost 100, the show cost wiU be 
70% of that figure. 

DAYTIME NETWORK TV: The cost per quarter-hour of programing is about 55% 
of the time figure. 

TV SPOT: National first-run syndication programing averages out to 35% of the 
time cost; programing for all types of spot averages out to 17% of the time cost. 

Source: McCann-Erickson and SPONSOR. 

Watch for Revlon to penetrate the proprietary drug field as part of its diversifi- 
cation plan. The expansion will be via the purchase route. 

Another direction that Revlon's diversification will likely take is modern foods — per- 
haps a low cholesterol margarine. 

Madison Avenue agencies this week were hopping with station managers. 

Rep staffs, already loaded with a mass of requests for tv availabilities, found the 
squiring around of the visitors somewhat tough. 

(The wholesale invasion also touched off rumors that some of the visitors were in town 
to shop around for new reps.) 

A major tv spot buyer has joined the ranks of film barterers : Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample, on behalf of General Mills, is offering the Lone Ranger in return for time. 

The deal: Each film will allow for 414 minutes of commercial time. The station gives 
General Mills two minutes of this and is free to sell the remaining 2^4 minutes. 

DFS stipulates 52 films a year and guarantees all handling charges. 

It's a good bet that the next big turn in media operations among agencies heavily 
loaded with tv and radio will be this: A switch from all-media buying to the old sys- 
tem of air media specialists functioning in their own orbits. 

Here's why: 

• The specialist in air media has little in common with print; in fact, he must divorce 
himself from that kind of perspective entirely. 

• The air media expert is now required to have a mastery not only over the com- 
plexities of tv and radio but over programing as well. Keeping up with the rapid 
changes in these fields is a fulltime job in itself. 

• A top air media specialist is the person who really engineers the pre-sell; if he wears 
too many hats at one time he can't do his main job full justice. 

What management men anticipate as the next step is along this line : At the top there'll 
be a chairman of all-media planning on an account ; but supervision of the buying 
will be cut right down the middle— with tv-radio in their own bailiwick and the rest of 
the media in another. 

What could stem from this revamping of functions: A surge for control over pro- 
graming by the tv media authority. (It's already loomed up in a couple of the top rank- 
ing tv agencies.) 

SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 



It looks like the keynote of the Kellogg spot tv campaign this fall will be station 
merchandising — and lots of it. 

Leo Burnett this week was recruiting roadmen whose twin task will be 1 ) to estab- 
lish good Kellogg relations with stations carrying its film strips, and 2) make sure that 
Kellogg is getting ample merchandising mileage out of the shows. 



A sizable spot radio campaign that popped up in New York was Kelvlnator 
Ranges (Geyer) ; 60-70 markets are on the list. 

Another caller for daytime minute availabilities: Jell-O (Y&R). 



The vista for new national spot tv business continues bright. 
Here are late developments in various spot centers : 

Chalk up Minneapolis as a promising source of national spot, especially tv. A 

number of companies that haven't used tv before are hopping into test markets this fall, with 
plans of expanding nation-wide. 

Among the latest of these: 

Butter Kernel Corn (Bruce Brewer), daytime I.D. saturations in five markets for a 
minimum of eight weeks. 

Anderson Window Wall (Campbell-Mithun), looking at weather, news, and syndica- 
tion for a run of 39 weeks as a test in Pittsburgh. Suggests a case of moving right into Pitts- 
burgh Plate Glass' own backyard. 

Gold Seal Glass Wax (Campbell-Mithun) starts a sturdy Christmas campaign mid- 
November with daytime spots in about 80 markets. 

Northwest Airlines (Campbell-Mithun) is mulling a chainbreak schedule, without a 
test, in all markets from which the airline draws business. 

Likely reasons for the Minneapolis spot upsurge: (1) Reps have been concentrating 
on the city's agencies with presentations, and (2) more stations appear willing to give 
merchandising cooperation, thus providing reps with a new twist in their pitches. 

Chicago's contribution to new national spot tv business the past week included 
Helene Curtis' Spray Net (McCann-Erickson) and Lever's All (NLB). 

Many of the Curtis day and night spots later will be used for Tempo in 10 markets. 
All's buy — daytime minutes and 20-seconds— is in 50 markets for eight weeks. 



Carling Brewing is trying out something new for itself in spot radio. 

It's scheduling 5-minute segments of Candid Mike at the rate of 13 to 30 playings 
a week in these four New England markets: Worcester, Mass., Waterbury, Conn., Augus- 
ta, Me., and Berlin, N. H. 

It had been using minutes and 20-second spots. Agency: Harold Cabot, of Boston. 



Here's something that research people think could spread across the country. Ex- 
isting independent radio stations being knocked out of first place in the ratings as 
more stations drop network ties and enter the independent ranks as newcomers. 

Observers say they see this as a logical mathematical sequence; for the incoming inde- 
pendents will tend to split away audiences — not from network affiliates — but from the 
other independent stations. 

An interesting angle connected with this development: As more stations go independent 
in a market and intensify the competition within that classification, the total amount of 
listening increases. 

In other words, the invader usually couples a hard-hitting promotion campaign to 
his entry, and the result of this and counter-campaigns is to stimulate listener interest. 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



Industry people making the circuit of the current NAB regional meetings re- 
port that triple-spotting is the top subject of corridor discussion. 

All of which ties in with Leo Burnett's findings— just compiled— from the survey it 
conducted on triple-spotting policy among 479 stations. 

The agency heard from 420 stations as follows : 

• In network option areas, 411 stations have spotting policies that are compatible with 
Burnett policy. 

• In station time areas, 43.1% reported they triple-spot in places where the agency 
preferred they wouldn't. 

• On the matter of network program cut-backs, 168 stations said they never snip off 
anything, while 171 admitted they cut out promotion for shows they don't carry and substi- 
tute their own promotion spots. Only 54, or 17.5%, reported they cut out the promos for 
shows they don't carry and substitute commercials. 

In making the findings available to stations, Burnett noted: "In the past we have un- 
doubtedly contributed to the (multiple spotting) problem by vigorous demands for 
high-rated spots. But the problem has assumed such magnitude that we see real evidence 
of the deterioration of the medium, and some advertisers are beginning to move away 
from spot television. We are sure you will agree that it's to our mutual advantage to clean 
house." 

The young housewife continues to be the dominant daytime tv viewer by age 
group. 

Here's a breakdown of homes using daytime tv Monday through Friday (10 a.m. to 
5 p.m.) as reported by Nielsen for March- April 1958: 

AGE % VIEWING ANY PART OF WEEK AVG. WEEKLY VIEWING 

16-34 87.2% 12 hrs., 27 mins. 

35-49 80.0 10 hrs., 29 mins. 

50 & over 77.6 10 hrs., 4 mins. 

The above represents quite an increase over the like period in 1957. At that time 
the tally for the 16-34 group was 11 hours; for the 35-49 group, 9 hours and 12 minutes; and 
for the 50-plus segment, 9 hours and 17 minutes. 

Another substantial increase is expected to result from the upcoming competi- 
tion among the three networks on the daytime programing front. 



Compared to a year ago, filmed network tv shows hold a slightly bigger numeri- 
cal edge over sponsored live programing in prime time this fall. 

The comparison in terms of numbers and percentages: 

1958 1957 

TYPE NO. PCT. NO. PCT. 

Film 65 61.3% 72 59.5% 

Live 41 38.7 49 40.5 

TOTAL 106 100.0 121 100.0 

Source: October-November 1958 and 1957 COMPARAGRAPHS in sponsor. 



ABC TV is only four quarter-hours short of the 70 quarter-hours the network 
has made available for its daytime charter plan. 

Also indicative of the boom in daytime tv (see 23 August sponsor) : ABC TV to date 
has 80 daytime quarter-hours sold, exclusive of Mickey House. All these segments 
are on a 26-week-firm basis. 

Network tv this season is not without an appreciable quota of newscomers. 
They include Clairol, Williamson & Dickie, Manhattan Shirt, Renault, and Olin 
Mathieson. 

Coming over from spot are Hills Bros, and Brylcreem. 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued. 



McCann-Eriokson this week strongly implied that the American Newspapers 
Publishers Association was engaging in a destructive kind of selling after the associ- 
ation had tried to fire up dealers against Buick's campaign (which favors tv). 

Elsewhere ANPA was accused of destroying the effectiveness of advertising as a 
whole by planting doubts with dealers about the wisdom of the factory's basic promotional 
strategy. 

Apparently ANPA's bureau triggered the attack without knowing that — even though in 
Buick's introductory phase tv was the No. 1 medium — newsprint would, on the year, get as 
much money as it did from the 1958 model. 

TvB meanwhile had commissioned an outside study on what viewers thought 
about the initial Bob Hope show for Buick and their opinion of the 1959 model. 

The findings: Of those who had seen the model in other medias, 62% had no opinion 
and 18% said they liked it. But those who saw the car on the Hope special, 16% 
offered no opinion, whereas 53% said they liked it very much. 

The three tv networks came through this August with joint gross time billings of 
$41,509,492—6.8% better than the same month in 1957. 

The breakdown, as compiled by LNA-BAR for TvB: ABC TV, $6,923,731, up 12%; 
CBS TV, $19,383,736, up 6.3%; and NBC TV, $15,202,021, up 5.0%. The tally for Janu- 
ary-August: $365,699,450, or 11.4% over 1957. 

The consistent pulling-power of news as a radio commodity is exemplified by this 
common factor to be found in the March-through-August Pulse reports for the New York met- 
ropolitan area: 

At least five news shows turned up in the top 10 programs. 

(See page 29 for roundup on how radio stations are streamlining their news opera- 
tions.) 

Being realistic merchants, syndicators have arrived at a show formula which they 
think gives their wares a big step toward success from the start. 
The formula — if you haven't become aware of it by now: 

1) The plot must revolve around a good action-adventure theme. 

2) The setting must be somewhere in the great outdoors (on the western plains, un- 
der or on top of the sea or harbor, or on a battlefield). 

3) The hero must represent the dynamic, resourceful type — the sort of figure 
that any American boy admires or would like to emulate. 

(For the latest on syndicator developments see FILM-SCOPE, page 55.) 

Note this week's No. 1 conversational theme on Madison Avenue: The tv industry will 
only be kidding itself if it fails to give sober reflection to the mounting number of 
ethical plights surrounding it. 

• Luncheon table philosophers have these news developments and trade matters in mind: 

• The quiz uproar. 

• Washington's probe of channel allocations, climaxed the past week by indictments. 

• An ad agency with an enormous stake in tv urging the networks to put their gelling on 
a strict rate-card basis before the very roots of the medium are weakened. (The networks 
addressed said they were in wholehearted agreement with the agency.) 

• The continuing pressure by certain agencies and advertisers to kill triple-spotting and 
the practice of network program cut-backs on the local level. 

Observed an official of a top-rank agency in tv: "If there's anything the medium is in 
dire need of right now, it's a quality of leadership and statesmanship that will allay the 
uneasiness of both the advertiser and the viewing public." 

For other now* coverage In this Issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 

Spot Buys, page 46; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 57; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 68; and Film-Scope, page 55. 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



Iron Ore . 



ONE OF MINNESOTA'S GIANT INDUSTRIES! 

An annual payroll of $102,000,000 goes 
to 18,000 workers . . . and they ALL LIVE 

and SPEND in KDAL— KDAL-TV land i 



O^^yJ^ S^AjCryT^ 




4 'BIO $Tim' 



fot sluii'mi out $$le$ 

in the 
RMih'Oufhm m9 




s 



TOP RATINGS: First in every ARB survey, sign-on to 
started operations — an unequalled rating record 
Durham area. Yours to use for spots or features. 



ign-of=F, since it 
n the Raleigh- 



WRAL-TV/^ 

^SUPERLATIVE EQUIPMENT: First Videotape recorder in North Carolina... 
$100,000 4-camera Mobile Unit . . . tv/o of the South's largest studios v^ith 
seven cameras, rear screen projector, three 70-circuit lighting boards. 



WRAL-TV 



X 



CAPITAL CITY LOCATION: Everybody looks to the capital for news and 
about government, economic, agricultural, even sports activities, 
and Channel 5 gives it to them, visually, verbally, effectively. 

WRAL-TV/^ 

^ POPULAR PROGRAMMING: The best of NBC, from TODAY to JACK PAAR 
...choices from ABC ... exclusive local programs that attract ond hold 
loyal audiences. 



These four — and more — will help 
you raise your sales average in 
this big and booming markel . . . 
from Greensboro to the coast, 
from Virginia to the South Carolina 
line. Get all the data, now, about 



Carolina's Colorful 
Capital Station 



FULL POWER CHANNEL 5 

WRAL-TV 

Fred Fletcher, Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



REPRESENTED BY H-R, Inc. 



I M 49th ar^ 
I^H Madisok 



Streamlined rate cards 
You're at it again in your fight for 
things that will improve the broadcast 
industry. This time I am impressed 
by the article on "Streamlined Rate 
Card," outlining the suggestion of 
Dick O'Connell. 

Having come from the newspaper 
field where, by and large, their rates are 
simple compared with those in broad- 
casting, I am convinced that our busi- 
ness would benefit from rate simplifica- 
tion. I recognize some problems in 
connection with O'Connell's suggestion, 
but am convinced that the gains would 
far outweigh the efforts that would be 
necessary to meet the problems of such 
a rate card concept. 

If the reaction from the station oper- 
ators is anywhere near as favorable as 
that you reported from timebuyers, 
perhaps you can take credit for initiat- 
ing another step ahead for our great 
industry. Keep up your good work. 

R. M. Brown 

Gen. mgr., 

KPOJ, Portland Oregon 

I cannot speak too strongly in favor of 
the one-rate card plan, discounted only 
for total unit use within a seven-day 
period. It has eliminated many prob- 
lem and has allowed us to operate on 
a realistic basis as far as billings are 
concerned. 

Attached you will find a copy of our 
current rate card which was effective 
February 1, 19.58. It was published 
about November of 1957. 

In our previous rate card (Number 
2) we experimented for the first time 
with one rate for both national and 
local advertisers, but we still followed 
the old idea of discounts between one 
and two-hundred and fifty times. Be- 
ginning with Rate Card #3, we dis- 
carded the yearly discount plan and 
adopted the discount for unit use 
within a seven-day period. 

I have long felt that the differential 
between national and local advertising 
was not only unfair but uneconomic. 
Generally speaking, local advertising 
calls for more man-power and selling 
(Please turn to page 24) 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



at work for you this fail and winter 



I Married Joan" 




5:00 PM 

Monday through Friday 

•k, this popu- 
jocked wit 
family appeal. (3:30 PM i 
the quitting time for the a 
age Detroit hourly-rated 
dustrial worker.) 



"The Life of Riley" 



ig and original program- 
ming schedules this new, high 
quality strip in prime time. 
"The Life of Riley"— hot ofF 
its long and successful NBC 
run — is the ideal family kick- 
off for an evening's television 



Again this season, WWJ-TV 
in Detroit offers high quahty 
local programming you can 
depend on for genuine viewer 
interest, for depth-impact that 
creates sales. These are shows 
that people really look for- 
ward to, really sit down to 
watch, really follow with en- 
thusiasm. Check the list— then 
call your PGW Colonel. 



Northward to Flint and beyond, 
southward to Toledo and beyond, 
Detroit's WWJ-TV covers one 
of America's largest and wealth- 
iest centers of population. 




AMFM STATION WWJ 
Mfoled by The D«lfo.l N«wj 
Repreientotives: Peters, GrifTin, Woodward, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 19.58 



4.-^!:«!TS^" i£Sw?^^*'*iS* 



WSBT-TV 



PRIMARY COVERAGE- 

752,580 TV VIEWERS IN 
PROSPEROUS MICHIANA* 



Here's How 

WSBT-TV DELIVERS 

the South Bend-Elkhart 

TV Audience 



TOP RATED 50 TV PROGRAMS IN 
SOUTH BEND-ELKHART MARKET 



WSBT-TV CARRIES . . . 

• The Top 7 programs 

• 8 of the top 10 progran 

• 17 of the top 25 progrc 

• 30 of the top 50 progrc 




ARB Ratings— Ju 



} 17-23 



No other station or combination of stations comes 
close to WSBT-TV in the number of top-rated shows 
carried. Further proof of this overwhelming viewer 
preference is the fact that WSBT-TVs 10 P.M. news 
broadcast is one of the highest-rated local or national 
newscasts in the Nation! . . . You're paying for audi- 
ence—get it with WSBT-TV. Ask your Roymer man for 
details or write to this station. 

* 15 counties in Northern Indiana and 

Southern Michigan. UHF set count, 209,050 

— 3.6 persons per family. 



TV 



SOUTH 
BEND, 
IND. 



ASK PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



49TH^&'[ MADISON 

{Cont'd from pa^e 22 I 

and servicing expense than does an I 
agency placed national schedule with I 
guaranteed credit and well producedW 
copy or transcriptions. It was primar«fil 
ily for this reason that we went to T 
the one-rate card plan. The result has I 
been most gratifying and a number I 
of stations are now doing the same | 
thing in this market. 

Robert R. Feagin I 
Pres. WPDQ, 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

In the September 6th issue I noted I 
with interest the article on Dick O'Con- I 
nell's so-called "Streamlined" rate card. I 
I noted also the great percentage of I 
favorable comment by agency time- \ 
buyers. I am wondering if the enthu- I 
siasm shown was because the job of I 
selling and buying would become so I 
simple, or because such a rate card I 
would benefit the advertiser. I seriously I 
doubt the latter. 

In elimination frequency discounts I 

Mr. O'Connell is striking a low blow I 

at the 13-, 26-, etc., week advertiser. I 

This alone could drive an advertiser I 

into other media. By instituting a flat I 

rate for all time segments Mr. O'Con- [ 

nell would probably bring about rate I 

increases. I agree that rate cards are I 

becoming too cumbersome — they ought I 

to be simplified . . . but please let's not I 

over-simplify rate cards and let's not I 

forget who pays the bills. 

Mort Yanow, 

Radio /tv dir., 

Feigenbaum & Wermen 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Negro markets issue 

Congratulations on your excellent re- 
port on the important Negro market. 
Please send 2.5 reprints immediately 
and quote prices on larger quantities. 
Leonard Walk, 
Gen. mgr., WAMO, 
Pittsburgh 

Pet milk promotion 

1 read with great interest your articlr 

on the Pet Milk Promotion. 

The only thing that was lacking was' 

the name of the winner. He was Jack 

Cecil and he received a $.500 check 

from H. A. Beasley. 

John E. North 
V.p. & gen. mgr.. 
WDXI-TV, 
Jackson. Tenn. 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBKR 19.5H 



MGM's 



IVATJ 



ON 



^ ' W Xt t V - T V ^ 

■•■•" ■"':!t!,:.::: ""-. ,„ 

tocusr 



September 5, 1^58 



ipilarious subjects never before 
.tiWn on TV... tie -up your market 
deire the sellout! ' 



^- fiichard A n. 

i^iiO Broadvay 
^«>^ York, Nev York 

•^ust thought VD i^ 
"=« month prtor ^ t. ''°° *•"• '» 

-liable. '^''^-" -ealzy ^^hes that vo 

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4 20.6 18.4 



■^ S:^oS'''-««lng 




TAKE A TIP 
FROM LEO... 
AND CALL 
MGM-TV 
TODAY! 

Write... wire or phone... 
Richard A. Harper, 
General Sales Mgr. 
1540 Broadway, 
New York 36, New York 
JUdson 2-2000 



A Service Of 
Loew's Incorporated 



^ 



REFLEXACTION 



Six months ago, Channel 4 in St. Louis became a CBS Owned statio 

it's first! In fact, KMOX-TV has the largest share of the St. Louis television audience according to 
all three audience measurement services... Nielsen, Pulse, and ARB. 

Nielsen, for example, shows that KMOX-TV is ahead of competing stations for all three periods 
of the broadcast day— morning, afternoon and night! 

For KMOX-TV, leadership was inevitable. Because CBS ownership, in St. Louis as elsewhere, 
means a full schedule of top-rated programs from the CBS Television Network, the very best 
local live programming and the finest feature films from Hollywood's major studios. 

It follows that month-in, month-out more and more advertisers are finding Mid-America's 
most sales-productive medium is KMOX-TV. You will too... naturally. 



• Represented by CBS Television Spot Sale; 



I 



ing of 312,830 fai 
weekly during daytime, this microphone creates 
the 24th largest radio market in the nation. Its 
total weekly audience is larger by 711% than 
its strongest Charlotte radio competitor. 



^SPONSOR 



Radio peps up 



its news 



leadership 




WOR, N. Y., reporter took this photo of recent Jersey Central train disaster from a 
boat chartered by the station. WOR's detailed, on-the-spot coverage consistently beat 
wire service reports. It's a good example of how radio seeks news superiority 



^ Object is to build ratings, prestige, audience loyalty 
via stepped-up showmanship; oil companies big buyers 

^ Planes, helicopters, speedboats help local stations get 
faster, more spectacular coverage; tv set to follow suit 



Vvh( 



1 hen a Jersey Central commuter 
train plunged off a bridge at Bayonne, 
N. J., last month and carried 48 pas- 
sengers to their deaths. New York ra- 
dio station WOR and its news staff 
sprang into action. Within minutes. 
WOR carried a report of the tragedy, 
and soon after was broadcasting 
the-spot accounts of the rescue opera- 
tions from both a tugboat and an air 
plane. For more than 12 hours, WOR 
reports ran well ahead of the wire serv- 
ices and the local newspapers. 

The unusual aspect of this type of 
rapid radio news coverage today is 



that it isn't unusual at all. In only two 
years, the local radio station has un- 
dergone a revolution in local news cov- 
erage, and now is competing for — and 
often winning — the reporting role once 
dominated by newspapers. 

While this basic trend is not new, 
it's apparent that it will greatly accel- 
erate in the next year, for two major 
reasons: 

1) The local radio station that pro- 
vides the fastest coverage of local news 
is finding that it not only boosts its 
over-all ratings but also gives it added 
stature and prestige in its community. 



2) Advertisers and agencies, look- 
ing for local radio shows with both 
high ratings and community accept- 
ance, are becoming more aware that 
the top station in many markets is the 
station with the most aggressive news 
organization. 

3 ) Moreover, it looks as if television 
similarly will be moving into the local 
news coverage area more extensively 
as soon as technical problems are 
eliminated. KTLA, Los Angeles, for 
one, already has launched a "flying Iv 
station" — a helicopter rig that gets to 
the spot fast. The growth of videotajie 
should be a big help to tv endeavors. 

A program specialist for one of the 
major radio station rep firms made 
this significant point to SPONSOR: 

"In many markets, radio stations 
have the same records, the same type 
of personalities, and much the same 
general programing. The area where 
one station can stand out above its 



4 OCTOBER 1958 




Mobile news patrols: Many aggn 
equipped with beeper phones for on-th 
cars which permit fast coverage of an\ 



iitions toda> hj\c iiiuljile units 
. W^AI, Cincinn'ti, has five such 
lou-. water main break to robbery 




Helicopters: Some stations, such as WPEN, Philadelphia, use helicopers to catc 
news fast and give on-the-scene reports. When the "copters aren't in use on 
stories, stations frequently employ them in relaying traffic reports and special < 



Showcases: Stations proud of their news coverage (like Pittsburgh's KQV) display 
news gathering and reporting facilities to the public. KQV's News Central head- 
(|uart<Ts are on the ground floor of the downtown Char 



mber of Commerce building 




competitors — and boost its average 
ratings at the same time — is in ag- 
gressive, on-the-spot coverage of news." 

Wells Barnett. programing strategist 
for John Blair, notes that this develop- 
ment came naturally enough. "Tele- 
\ ision removed radio's major function 

the big talent production. Radio had 
lo replace it with a service function. 
iMid that big function today is local 
pcws. This is obvious from the fact 
ihat there are virtually no newspaper 
extras today, because people have 
already gotten the hot local news from 
radio first." 

The transition to fast local news cov- 
erage was made almost overnight by 
many stations. From the old days of 
'"rip and read" — ripping a wire serv- 
ice report off the machine and reading 
it on the air — stations moved quickly 
in two areas: 

• Localizing the news. Stations 
snapped up the old journalistic trick of 
slanting the news in terms of its sig- 
nificance to their particular commu- 
nity. For example, a new farm bill 
being debated in Congress is handled 
by most local stations today not in 
terms of its meaning to the nation but 
rather in terms of its effect on the 
farmers nearby. 

• Initiative in coverage. Stations 
which once read the news from local 
newspaper columns now find that 
newspaper editors rely on their radios 
for the first news reports. Whether it's 
a water main break, a robbery or a 
strike, the local radio station has to 
get it on the air first. 

To acquire the speed and mobility 
necessary for this type of coverage, 
radio stations have demonstrated 
startling ingenuity. In addition to the 
usual remote cars or trucks and be:oer 
phones, stations are now devising 
countless means for getting on-the-spot 
coverage. These include: 

1 ) Helicopters and airplanes. ' n 
covering the Jersey Central train 
wreck, for instance, WOR's flying re- 
porter Bob Garrity kept his plane over 
the scene for several hours. Helicop- 
ters, either purchased or chartered, re- 
port on disasters, traffic tie-ups, and 
similar news of local interest. 

2) Strinp^ers. Stations have latched 
on to a standard journalistic short cut 
to get local coverage — the parttime, 
freelance observer ( or stringer I . KEX, 
Portland, Ore., is one of the most ac- 
tive stations using stringers, claims 
that more than 1.000 of them cover lo- 
( al news over a wide ar^a for KEX. 



• 4 OCTOBER 19.58 



3) Two-way radio. Many stations 
have worked out deals with local cab 
companies to get the first word on ac- 
cidents or other news events. KFSD in 
San Diego, for one, has use of the 1;> 
cal Yellow Cab transmitter, gets re- 
ports from more than 200 cab drivers 
when something newsworthy breaks. 

Local news coverage varies widely, 
from an international event with local 
repercussions to a fire. Here are just 
a few recent examples of outstanding 
news reporting by radio stations: 

During the recent Mideast crisis, 
Cleveland radio station WERE can- 
celed its regular broadcasting schedule 
and reported the U. N. hearings di- 
rectly from New York. During the 
official translations, WERE switched to 
Washington where three Cleveland-area 
Congressmen were interviewed, along 
with Ohio Senator John Bricker. 

But for WERE this was just the 
start. To give even broader coverage. 
WERE called BBC in London and 
aired interviews with two members of 
BBC's foreign news department. Then 
WERE called Paris and Moscow, and 
got interviews from those two capitals. 
Promotion - minded WERE didn't 
stop there. In addition to its regular 
broadcasting, WERE also sent its mo- 
bile units around Cleveland broadcast- 
ing the coverage over loudspeakers, 
with typed news reports pinned to bul- 
letin boards on the sides of the mobile 
trucks. And it had pretty girls carry- 
ing portable radios tuned to the WERE 
reports. Cost to WERE for the two- 
day coverage, including canceled com- 
mercial time: $3,200. 

On a strictly local basis, a good ex- 
ample of alert coverage is provided by 
WSB in Atlanta, Ga. When a report 
came in on WSB's police radio recent- 
ly that Rich's Department Store was 
afire, the station's No. 1 Radio Car was 
on the scene in five minutes and on the 
air with coverage. Radio Car No. 2 
broadcast firefighting reports from the 
other end of the block, and for nearly 
six hours WSB got every detail until 
the five-alarm fire was under control. 
And since the fire occurred late at 
night, WSB taped all of the on-the- 
scene reports and edited them for use 
the next morning on WSB's regular 
newscasts. 

Radio stations also have found that 
local news often can be combined with 
public service for an effective one-two 
punch. Last year, when Pittsburgh was 
threatened with a transit strike, KDKA 
{Please turn to page 50) 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 




Mobile studios: Completely equipped mobile studios piovi 

WXYZ, for example, uses this trailer (dubbed the "Wandering Wigloo") from which 

a nuirninji music and news show is broadcast, also service and promotional events 




Stringers: Freelance r 
on the out-of-the-way s 
Portland, Ore., here re( 



mployed by many radio stations to have a man 
IS possible. Pat Wilkens, news editor of KEX, 
itness story from one of KEX's 1,000 observers 



Airplane 

San Antd 



Small airplanes providi 
, reaches the scene in i 
dio equipment to 



another way to get to news sites fa 
5 Cessna 172, also has three mobile i 
head start on any important 



KONO. 

nd cars 
break 






North Agency's 
radio/tv emphasis 

boosts it to top 
within three years 



r". 



^ With Toni for a starter, 
newcomer now is billing 
$111^ million; marketing and 
research techniques play big 
role in its basic operations 



Iwlost advertising agencies go 
through their infancy on a diet of ink 
— i.e., their first major experience usu- 
ally is in the print media. 

But when North Advertising, Inc.. 
marks its third birthday in Chicago in 
a few weeks, it will be emerging from 
an entirely different kind of inception 
— one that is intimately tied in with the 
air media. (Perhaps two-thirds of its 
billings are in radio/tv). 

To appreciate what this air-born 
start means, consider these king-size 
facts: 

• Air business is big business. 
North was in the resi)e(table brackets 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



NORTH'S STREAMLINED GROUP SYSTEM 

Group I Group II Group III 









Creative 


Croup Head 












it 




Account 
Management.. 


Account Directors 











Group Head 






t 




Account Directors 











Group Head 






t 




Account Directors 



r 



Group Heads and Account Directors use service departments as needed. 



Marketing 
Services 



Director 



Media Dept. 
Media Research 
Market Research 
Creative Research 

Radio & Tv 
Business 

Merchandising 
Department 



Financial & 
Administrative Services 



Accounting Department 
Personnel & Administration 



^ 



Creative 




New York 




Beverly Hills 


Services 




Office 




Office 


Director 




Director 




Director 


Art 


Production 


Production 


Copy 




Traffic 




Traffic 


Production — 










Print 










Production — 










Broadcast 










Traffic Print 
Traffic 
Broadcast 




Account 
Director 







right off, billing around $10,000,000 in 
its initial year (much of it from Toni ) . 

• Air business is fast-paced. To 
cope with the speed and expenditures 
of its clients. North has to use ultra- 
streamHned internal operations (see 
chart). Basically, the agency consists 
of two manageable categories — market- 
ing and creative. There are no little 
offbeat islands of power, no leftovers 
from an outmoded past. 

• Air business requires quick think- 
ing. North's executive roster is char- 
acterized by Chicago advertising cir- 
cles as "bright brainpower." Market- 
ing techniques rank high in the human 
tool kit, plus the associated strategies 
— testing, motivational research, etc. 

-North was started in December. 
1955, by Don P. Nathanson (ex-Toni) 
and Cyrus H. Nathan (ex-Biow). Na- 
thanson, the president, sums up North's 
direction thus: 

Sure, the modern agency is expect- 



ed to contribute persuasive copy ideas, 
but far more is demanded than that. 
Its marketing stratagems should be 
novel and knowing. Its research tech- 
niques should be bold and precedent- 
shattering. Its media selections should 
be daring and productive. Its contri- 
bution to the development of new 
products should be original and fact- 
founded." 

As one of its agency core services, 
North's marketing division includes 
the media department, media research, 
market research, creative research, ra- 
dio and tv business, and the merchan- 
dising department. 

Explaining how his division oper- 
ates, Lester A. Delano, vice president 
in charge of marketing services, says: 
"As everybody knows, a media plan 
has to be based on a wide range of fac- 
tors — everything from what your mar- 
keting target is to the image you wish 
to create. The big operational prob- 



lem is how do you feed all this infor- 
mation into the media planning proc- 
ess, and at the same time make it a 
creative job, rather than just a rigid 
formal procedure? 

"We've found that the best way to 
do this is to integrate a number of de- 
partments into one group. Our market 
research department gives us our tar- 
get in terms of the usual demographic 
factors. Our creative research depart- 
ment tells us the nature of the people 
we want to shoot for. Our media re- 
search section relates all this to indi- 
vidual media characteristics. 

"Of course, this is all happening at 
once. And the real necessity is in 
having the kind of organizational 
structure that lets it happen all at 
once; that allows for feedback of 
hunches and ideas among the various 
departments, and which allows the 
various specialists to get in on all fac- 
ets of a problem, rather than just con- 



SPONSOR • 4 OCTOBER 1958 



finiii 



themseKes to a relatively 



Norths collective thinkiiij; can l)e<l 
l)e illustrateci 1)\ these recent tactics: 

When the Toni Company bought 
You Bet Your Life in January of 1957. 
one of the obvious problems was to 
jjet sponsor identification for Toni 
brands on this show after its \ears of 
asscK-iation v\ith DeSoto. This was 
helped along by using all three Marx 
Brothers in a series of integrated com- 
mercials for the show's major brand. 
After only four shows under Toni 
sponsorship, its identification regis- 
tered 8th among 52 shared programs 
surve\ed by Trendex. 

When the stamp plan promotions hit 



Chicago food chains, North's client. 
Jewel Foods, decided not to join the 
tide but continue its emphasis on qual- 
ity and service. So North prepared a 
series of documentary-type I.D.'s. fea- 
turing consumer testimonials and spe- 
cial price-leader sales. The price- 
leaders were run in a vertical satura- 
tion plan on Thursdays on two Chicago 
tv stations. In one instance Jewel sold 
out its heavily stocked pork price- 
leader before the weekend — and had to 
run ads apologizing to its customers. 
The total strategy presumably paid off, 
too. because Jewel's sales actually im- 
proved during the stamp warfare. ( The 
commercials were shot on location in 
Jewel super-marts and rushed on the 



I|||l||||;i!ll1i||l!<||1llll|||l!lll|il||li;il!l{lhlll|l||||iilhil!!:!llllllll1l1l1lllillli1lllilllli 



NORTH'S CLIENT & BILLINGS SCORE 



1955 ( 1 month) 

WON: Toni Home Permanent 

TIp-Toni Home Permanent 
Tonette Home Permanent 
Silver Curl Home Permanen 
Spin & SofStyle Curlers 
Deep Magic Facial Lotion 
(All Toni Co.) 



WON: Englander Co. 

Prom Home Pern 
Lanvin Parfums 

BILLINGS: $10,000,000 



1SS7 

WON: Jewel Food Stores 

World-Wide Automobiles 

Schieffli Lace & Embroidery Institute 

Thorexln Cough Medicine (Gillette) 

Adorn Hair Spray (Toni) 

Hush Cream Deodorant (Toni) 

Twirl Home Permanent (Toni) 

LOST: Prom Home Permanent 

BILLINGS: $1 1,000,000 



WON: Pilsener Brewing ( POC Beer) 
Pfaelier Bros, (meat packers) 
Self End-Paper Permanent (Toi 

LOST: Lanvin Parfums 

World-Wide Automobiles 



BILLINGS: $1 1,500,000 



Coll.Tlive prolilem-tacklers are Don P. Nathanson, president, and vice presi- 
dent- Wall.-i Heymann, .Jr., Oorjie H. (Inienwald, and Mrs. Alice Westbrook 




air for impact in record time I. 

Entering the hair spray market after 
two dominant leaders already had been 
established ( Revlon and Helene Cur- 
tis ) was w hat the Toni Co. Adorn w as 
up against last August. By offering 
consumers a new^ hair styling, not just 
setting, through demonstration com- 
mercials. Adorn worked to the top 
within less than a year. Each com- 
mercial demonstrates two hair-styling 
tricks, offers viewers a "how-to" book- 
let. 

"Tension — the 20th century malady" 
was the approach used by North for its 
client. The Englander Co. (bedding I. 
The commercials illustrated, in fantasy 
style, tension and its relief, backing 
this up with solid product reason-why 
demonstration. 

Tonette is Toni's children's home 
permanent. To attract attention and 
to illustrate the process advantages of 
Tonette in an entertaining manner. 
North created a Tonette child charac- 
ter (animated by UPA ) . This little 
moppet talks plain facts to mothers in 
the film commercial series, won the 
1956 Chicago Federated Advertising 
Club award. 

Personality-salesman shows are fa- 
vorites at North. Currently it has on 
its roster: Arthur Godfreys Talent 
Scouts, Art Linkletter's People Are 
Funny and House Party shows. In the 
past. North has used Jack Bailey's 
Queen for a Day, Garry Moore, Ten- 
nessee Ernie Ford, and Jack Paar. 
North believes this experience is im- 
portant to any advertiser who has a 
product susceptible to salesman-demon- 
strator delivery. 

Among other types of tv shows. 
North is producing agency for Groucho 
Marx's You Bet Your Life, Masquerade 
Party, and is using Verdict is Yours, 
Treasure Chest, and Tic Tac Dough. 

Among the radio shows North has 
used are Nora Drake, Helen Trent, Our 
Miss Brooks, One Man's Family, Road 
of Life, Young Dr. Malone, Young 
Widder Brown, Right to Happiness, 
Frank Sinatra, and Robert Q. Lewis. 

As for new- product development and 
introduction George H. Gruenwald, 
vice president and creative group head, 
says: 

"We work with our clients on prod- 
uct development from the determina- 
tion of the need. We like to take the 
initiative in surveying the market po- 
tential, consumer receptiveness, possi- 
lile voids in the range of products al- 
\ Please turn to page 52) 



4 OCTOBKR 1958 



FM Transmitter 



AM Transmitter 




First regular commercial network -terco 
is Lawrence Welk"s Wednesday night -h..vv. 
now carried weekly on ABC TV plu- Radio. 
Stereo technique (right) used i>- -imple: 
there's no extra equipment needed - ju<t 
two microphone systems, two tran>-mitt<T- 
and ordinary home sets: tv (sound i- fm ) 
and am radio, adjusted 5' to 10' apart. 
When advertiser links the two network-. 
"third dimension" of stereo is a honu- 




FM Receiver 



r-\- 


_-_—/- 


1 


' — 7 — ' 



V 



I 

1_ LISTENER AT HOME _J 



AM Receiver 



Stereo cues two-way air media buys 



^ Plymouth orders first regular network stereo for Welk, 
bringing the new sound to 85% of U. S. tv/radio homes 

^ Local stereo shows— television/radio, radio /radio— are 
spurred by hi-fi manufacturers buying music programing 



Stereo has suddenly come out of the 
hi-fi showroom to become a staggering 
growth factor in air media buying. 
After six years of local broadcasts 
appealing mostly to hi-fi manufactur- 
ers, stores and certain "class" products 
— all at once stereo broadcasting has 
become a network business with boom- 
ing implications for 1) network am 
radio, 2) local fm radio, and 3) local 
tv/radio time sales. 

The first advertiser to put a regu- 
larly scheduled network stereo show 
on'fhe air is Plymouth, which added 
the full ABC Radio network lineup to 
the Wednesday night Lawrence Welk 
show on ABC TV starting 1 October. 
The next network stereo advertiser will 
be RCA Victor, which will promote its 



own stereo equipment and color tele- 
vision lines on the George Gobel show 
of 21 October on NBC TV and Radio. 

Both Welk and Gobel ivill bring 
stereo broadcast to around 85% of all 
television / radio households in the na- 
tion — without networks or audiences 
spending a penny for extra equipment. 

Unlike am-fm stereo, which requires 
a separate fm radio system in the home, 
tv/am stereo needs only ordinary tele- 
vision and radio sets. The networks, 
which already transmit tv and am, have 
to do just this to get stereo: simulcast 
a show and set up the microphones 
specially for "two ear" perspective. 

Among prime network prospects for 
stereo, ABC is campaigning all present 
advertisers of music shows on ABC 



TV, including Firestone. Oldsmobile. 
Chevrolet, Dodge and others. 

Local stereo business is far from 
new. Los Angeles has 22 fm outlets 
and New York has 16. The New York 
Times' WQXR began commercial stereo 
service on am-fm six years ago. Last 
spring, WNTA put its weekly 90- 
minute jazz show into tv-am-fm stereo, 
and Westinghouse radio division just 
bought into the show, joining Parlia- 
ment cigarettes and others. 

While am-fm stereo coidd interest 
the 13 million fm families across the 
country, the big upsurge in business 
is seen in tv-am stereo — both network 
and local. Any live television program 
can be made stereo with a buy of ra- 
dio (am) coverage to go along with it. 
In addition to the value of radio on its 
own, stereo is delivering the kind of 
enthusiasm and excitement that some 
ad execs thought impossible to find. 

Significantly, hi-fi has boomed thir- 
teen-fold in eight years to become a 
quarter-billion dollar industry with a 
$10 million ad budget that will be 
upped 10% more next year, with stereo 
the main promotion theme. ^ 



4 OCTOBER 1958 




Co-founders: (Itor) 
exec, vice pres., confer 
Hooperites, shared sam 



ard Hynes, Trendex pres., and Bob Rogers, 
)n new Trendex expansion. Both are former 
I office there, still do in their research firm 



Numbers salesmen : Eug 

plains recent moves c 
chaos.'" New Trende: 



ector of sales 
pany have been on road away from "ratings 
ce offers more qualitative data for advertisers 



BEHIND THE RATING SYSTEMS— PART III 



Trendex moving into 50 new markets 



^ Research firm move offers advertisers new qualitative 
coverage on brand preferences for 20 product categories 

^ Latest Trendex service designed to provide greater 
perspective, more qualitative data on media effectiveness 



What Trendex surveys: Television viewing, 
nationni and local on a regularly reported 
basis. Radio, local and net. on a "to-order" 

Kinds of reports: Tv Program PopuJarity 
Report based on 20 markets, each with three 
thi stations; issued monthly on loth of each 
month; covers sets in use, rating, audience 
composition and sponsor identification. Tele- 
vi.sion Advertisers' Report (not a ratings 
report), every two months; covers qualitative 
data such as audience composition, program 
selectivity index, sponsor identification and a 
general average table of preference for show 
types. Tv City Reports to commence next 
month, a brand new service (see text) of- 
fered in two sections — one giving ratings, 
composition, sets-in-use, etc. and the other 
a brand share index covering 20 individual 
product categories. 

Times measured : Daily 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., 
EST; Sundays 12 noon to 11 p.m. 



Techniques: Telephone coincidental based 
on approximate samples of from 1,000 to 
2,000 tv homes {depending on length of pro- 
grams) in each of the 20 cities. 



Extras . 
market 



Special ( 
mdies 



both 



'ght reports; special 
radio and tv; QRI 
arch, tv commercial 
, print 



media studies. 

fi^t Trendex they'll tell you that every 
step they've taken in the past year is 
along "the road out of the ratings 
woods." The step they took this week 
goes far toward bearing out their 
claim. The new Trendex City Tv Re- 
ports for 50 markets now under way 
with the first issue slated for early 
November is a giant stride in the di- 
rection of qualitative research for ad- 
vertisers, agencies, and tv stations. 



The City Reports will be produced in 
two sections; here is what each will 

• Section I: This report will cover 
the usual "numbers" data — sets-in-use, 
ratings, audience composition for each 
market. 

• Section II: This section will con- 
tain, for each market, a brand share 
index for 20 individual product cate- 
gories. For example, it will now be 
possible for a cereal advertiser to check 
the relative position of his brand 
against competitive brands in each of 
the Trendex markets; it will furnish 
a continuing check on both his mar- 



THE RATINGS 


SERIES 


This series which began last week 
is scheduled in following issues: 


The Pulse 


20 Sept. 


ARB 


27 Sept. 


Trendex (this week) 


4 Oct. 




11 Oct. 


C E. Hooper 


18 Oct. 


A. C. Nielsen 


25 Oct. 



• 4 OCTOBKR 1958 



keling strategy and media. For the tv 
stations, the brand share index will 
no doubt become an effective sales tool 
since they now can point out to an 
advertiser a specific situation where his 
brand is a weak seller and may need 
support. 

The reports are being sold as a pair 
or separately. For stations, the per 
market cost of both Section I and Sec- 
tion II as a package is $1,000. The 
cost for either Section I or II separate- 
ly is $700. For agencies and adver- 
tisers, naturally a different price pre- 
vails since they will be buying all or, 
most of the markets as a package. 

The 50 new markets into which 
Trendex is moving to furnish city re- 
ports are by no means the 20 markets 
which they now cover on a national 
net basis. For the locals, they begin 
with metro market No. 31 (after Niel- 
sen's 30th) ; next year they will prob- 
ably be adding the top 30 markets for 
a total of 80. 

Each product category in the brand 
index will have a sampling of about 
1,000 interviews per market. Reports 
will be published by Trendex within 20 
days after field work. Within each 
market, each product category will be 
covered about twice a year. 

The whole idea for this new cover- 
age was triggered by the biggest indi- 
vidual survey that Trendex ever con- 
ducted for an individual subscriber. 
This was a study for a principal agency 
for one of the major tv advertising 
clients during the past spring. It en- 
compassed a 250,000 home survey to 
determine the activities of housewives, 
husbands and children whether viewing 
tv or not. The study, unlike most 
Trendex surveys, was